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Category: TRS prehensor

Disability and the public - prosthetic arms and more: do we appear "competent"? (review)

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Disability and the public - prosthetic arms and more: do we appear "competent"? (review); published December 7, 2018, 15:50; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=8812.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1569164356, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Disability and the public - prosthetic arms and more: do we appear "competent"? (review)}}, month = {December},year = {2018}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=8812}}


The current view of us, what the general public thinks of us, seems to be a major aspect. Of "us", yes.

The research question for this armchair analyst thus will be: are we - arm amputees in specific, and, as people with a visible physical handicap more generally, more broadly as disabled people generally, seen as competent people?

Generally, the answer seems to be a clear "NO" right from the outset.

This should not come as a shock. There are good reasons to believe that, great reasons to make that plausible, perfect reasons to justify that statement. With that, there may be exceptions to that -  people that see through society's fairytales of disability, horror and fears, but they are usually the exception.

As I had figured out quite early into my enquiries into that issue, that this aspect is of absolutely no further practical concern not because it is not disconcerting - but because I cannot change it. And that is a rapid, lean and cynical logical consequence, that I stopped caring about what other people think of me based on, say, visual impression of my prosthetic arm. I may thus safely focus on function and comfort, sustainability and cost, without worrying too much about whether other people treat me as more or less competent based on my looks. Not because it would not be cool to take influence but because it is of no matter as to the target dimension: the tendendy to disregard any mental capacity of people with physical handicap appears to be implemented in many people's thinking outside of any actual experiences. And regardless of what type of prosthesis I wear.

If anything, I might optimize my appearance by simply trying to look reasonably neat.

But to bend over backwards for what really we have to concede are actually strange people? If anything, can we hack their brains?

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Understanding and informing design issues of a prosthetic arm for below elbow amputation by way of "taxonomy" [literature review, reality check]

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Understanding and informing design issues of a prosthetic arm for below elbow amputation by way of "taxonomy" [literature review, reality check]; published July 26, 2018, 21:18; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=7651.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1569164356, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Understanding and informing design issues of a prosthetic arm for below elbow amputation by way of "taxonomy" [literature review, reality check]}}, month = {July},year = {2018}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=7651}}


The academic and industrial attempts to approach prosthetic arms so far have been met with less success than the providers must have hoped for. Far less, in fact so little that we wonder what is going on.

Possibly, design issues are the key to this as however vaguely put, some analytic approach needs to inform better design - but how to really inform better design from issues based on analysis? What is a suitable analysis? If we cannot see any better designs anywhere in practice, real life, then what is the analysis worth? Can we analyze analyses to get a better understanding of what might be going on there?

We might best start with what we know to be true.

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Modifying Shimano Ultegra road bike setup on a Colnago C40 for left handed use - second approach [technical right below elbow amputee core focus work / bike adaptation]

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Modifying Shimano Ultegra road bike setup on a Colnago C40 for left handed use - second approach [technical right below elbow amputee core focus work / bike adaptation]; published January 27, 2018, 15:30; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=8196.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1569164356, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Modifying Shimano Ultegra road bike setup on a Colnago C40 for left handed use - second approach [technical right below elbow amputee core focus work / bike adaptation]}}, month = {January},year = {2018}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=8196}}


After a first approach, where also the history and idea where it came from is detailed [link], I now set up and tested a second approach to modifying my Colnago C40 carbon bike with a triple chainring Shimano Ultegra chainset.

The extensive testing of my first approach that I had performed there lead to a range of concise detailed issues and problems. There were now addressed, all, and thus a second (and significantly better) approach resulted.

As stated before, no disability sports advocate specializing in road bikes and no bicycle mechanic specializing in individualization and custom solutions over the years ever thought this was possible in this way. They all said it could not be done. And I had asked a few of them, since it had bugged me a lot. And as I had sold my Cannondale road bike after the amputation, thinking there was no way, I now got myself a road bike back and decided to go down my own path to really use it the way it is meant to be used.

Generally and as part of riding a road bike, I wanted fast and comfortable gear switching, fast and accessible and comfortable braking, and I wanted to be able to enjoy various and if possible equally comfortable sitting positions or body positions. A great road bike trip may be a lot longer than a fast mountain bike trip into the forest. Last but not the least, as amputee my stump usually would suffer from vibration induced pain after 20 minutes  particularly with hard connectors such as the Mert or Freelock adapters, so padding definitely was an issue.

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Case-study of a user-driven prosthetic arm design: bionic hand versus customized body-powered technology in a highly demanding work environment [article out]

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Case-study of a user-driven prosthetic arm design: bionic hand versus customized body-powered technology in a highly demanding work environment [article out]; published January 4, 2018, 14:29; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=8066.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1569164356, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Case-study of a user-driven prosthetic arm design: bionic hand versus customized body-powered technology in a highly demanding work environment [article out]}}, month = {January},year = {2018}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=8066}}


 


This is a blog post of one of the rare focused and well based scientific journal articles that really explains how real work, body powered and myoelectric arms relate and go together for a unilateral right below elbow amputee in a physically demanding work environment.

The prior presentation of this paper [poster at Cybathlon symposium 2016], which had been more pragmatically worded (with me thinking people would know anyway), this was now written up as article and published. During that process, the reviewers clearly made great points of all kinds of aspects I never knew were not sky clear to everyone.

So maybe, writing a ~ 30 page case study with > 210 references does clarify stuff, at least potentially and for those that actually read it. But possibly, it still requires attention to even just read it.

Knowledge does not come easy, Highlander! (Nakano, in: Highlander III The Final Dimension)

 

If you are more interested in visionary posts, read about the gadget features of the prosthetic arm in Kingsmen: The Golden Circle [link]. And technically, myoelectric control did have it coming. That technology remained uncool for four decades [link].

Publication [link]

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Modifying Shimano Ultegra road bike setup on a Colnago C40 for left handed use - first approach [technical right below elbow amputee core focus work / bike adaptation]

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Modifying Shimano Ultegra road bike setup on a Colnago C40 for left handed use - first approach [technical right below elbow amputee core focus work / bike adaptation]; published December 3, 2017, 15:11; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=7816.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1569164356, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Modifying Shimano Ultegra road bike setup on a Colnago C40 for left handed use - first approach [technical right below elbow amputee core focus work / bike adaptation]}}, month = {December},year = {2017}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=7816}}


I got myself a Colgnago C40 carbon road bike / race bike / Rennrad for leisure amateur purposes. That is, for the colloquial ride. With that, I am not a professional or competitive racer. Modifying my Shimano Ultegra road bike setup for left handed use therefore aims towards leisure purposes.

How to go about riding a road bike as arm amputee. This is the first approach and test. If you are after the improved set-up, head over to the page with the second approach [link] because that really worked a lot better.

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Fotoserie - Herstellung und Aufbereitung einer Serie von Passteilen für PMCTA-Sets [photos]

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Fotoserie - Herstellung und Aufbereitung einer Serie von Passteilen für PMCTA-Sets [photos]; published April 4, 2017, 15:55; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=7322.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1569164356, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Fotoserie - Herstellung und Aufbereitung einer Serie von Passteilen für PMCTA-Sets [photos]}}, month = {April},year = {2017}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=7322}}


Herstellung von 3D gedrucktem PMCTA Equipment. Alle Teile wurden von mir selbst entworfen und gedruckt. TRS Prehensor im Einsatz.

Fotoserie für die Einreichung zum bgw-Wettbewerb.

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Grip 5 Evolution Prehensor TRS - Cybathlon winning device - first bike ride test [video / 1:1]

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Grip 5 Evolution Prehensor TRS - Cybathlon winning device - first bike ride test [video / 1:1]; published January 21, 2017, 18:01; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=7119.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1569164356, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Grip 5 Evolution Prehensor TRS - Cybathlon winning device - first bike ride test [video / 1:1]}}, month = {January},year = {2017}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=7119}}


2 Comments

I use the voluntary closing (VC) Grip 5 Evolution Prehensor by TRS on my body powered prosthetic arm - the terminal device that Bob Radocy used when winning both heat and final of the Cybathlon prosthetic arm race - for a first bike ride. No modifications of bicycle, handlebar or prosthetic arm necessary whatsoever.

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Grip strengths (measured results)

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Grip strengths (measured results); published January 18, 2017, 20:09; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=7085.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1569164356, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Grip strengths (measured results)}}, month = {January},year = {2017}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=7085}}


Using a Camry EH101 electronic hand dynamometer, I went through a few prosthetic terminal devices for my arm to see just how strong they were. And I added a baseline for my (human) left hand and my (bare) stump.

This certainly provides a base for a range of discussions later. Or previous ones ; )

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Towards Extreme Cyborging (EC) microworks: very small things [grip mechanics theory, parametrization and then testing side by side - Trautman hook, Hosmer Mod 5 hook, TRS Prehensor, Touch Bionics iLimb revolution]

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Towards Extreme Cyborging (EC) microworks: very small things [grip mechanics theory, parametrization and then testing side by side - Trautman hook, Hosmer Mod 5 hook, TRS Prehensor, Touch Bionics iLimb revolution]; published December 28, 2016, 17:52; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=7010.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1569164356, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Towards Extreme Cyborging (EC) microworks: very small things [grip mechanics theory, parametrization and then testing side by side - Trautman hook, Hosmer Mod 5 hook, TRS Prehensor, Touch Bionics iLimb revolution]}}, month = {December},year = {2016}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=7010}}


Small things to be picked up, side by side demo with other prosthetic devices.

Yes, very small things.

"It is the little things that count", they said. "The little things are important", they said. They all said that. But behold, their "bionic" apparatus cannot handle little things! "Why is a hook not evil", they wondered. And a storm of little demo videos came upon them. Deep into the myriad of grip mechanics this went.

"Get a grip on grips", he said.

This totally bypasses the fact that after laying down real life consequences for what I call Extreme Cyborging, I just finished building my first own steel Trautman hook, and all just with shape information from the internet. Yeah, you read that right. I did not build yet another one of the ubiquitous funny hands that promises to change my life or what it is these 3D printed hands now do - no. I sit on the demand and I sit on the technology and what is it that I do? See? This is what should really disturb you - because given the current signs of the times, it should feel deeply wrong on many levels. To you. But then, we were likely living on different planets all along, and maybe it is time you realize that too ; ) After we knew since years in detail what the Cybathlon showed us yet again, with glory but not with any improvement, it is yet again up to us, the users, to push further into what is, what can be, and what matters. And honestly? We have seen far enough funny hand videos.

What we have not seen is the Rebirth of The Cool. The Rebirth of an absolutely insane gripper. Physically. In 3D printed steel. The Trautman hook is such a device. And I went for it just because I can.
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Grip planning and carrying out [TRS Prehensor vs. iLimb Ultra Revolution - theory and practice]

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Grip planning and carrying out [TRS Prehensor vs. iLimb Ultra Revolution - theory and practice]; published October 17, 2016, 17:49; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=6764.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1569164356, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Grip planning and carrying out [TRS Prehensor vs. iLimb Ultra Revolution - theory and practice]}}, month = {October},year = {2016}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=6764}}


To reliably plan and successfully carry out a grip using a prosthetic hand or gripper, it helps having a few requirements met.

This is obviously not clear at this moment, as recent experiences at the Cybathlon show. All the same, others and myself have addressed various related grip aspects previously so this is something we can come back to.

So let us start by watching the iLimb hand trying to grasp a clothespin.

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TRS Prehensor [grip surface tweaking]

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - TRS Prehensor [grip surface tweaking]; published October 16, 2016, 10:58; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=6722.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1569164356, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - TRS Prehensor [grip surface tweaking]}}, month = {October},year = {2016}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=6722}}


The TRS Prehensor [manufacturer> TRS] is a great gripper, and recently smoked all myoelectric competition (at a prosthetic arm side by side race at the "Cybathlon", a public Circus event that the NCCR Robotics held for reasons that so far are not entirely understood at least from a prosthetic hand/arm user view).

A week has gone by since then, and still no public statement of the NCCR robotics organizers as to why body powered arm technology performed so much better than they anticipated, and worse, still no cogent clever research program drafted to successfully address prosthetic arm issues. Not a single tweet by Professor Riener and his team containing #cybathlon and #trsprehensor - so, in all sports and fairness, we are probably done with assuming this was all about sports. It wasn't, and the communications very clearly show that.

The biggest issue at this moment for robotic researchers now may probably be: why is this possible? What happened? Can we lay down the reasons for that? Because keeping on missing out on any deeper understanding there will likely cause similar problems in the future - and we do not want that again, do we. There are deeply intriguing answers to these pressing questions. It is just that who has time to wait for these people! What takes them so long!

"I waited for 30 years for robot engineers to build me a prosthetic arm so I could finally clean up my house. It became a real mess during all these years. Three decades is a long time, you know." - Anonymous

No peace for the wicked.

And so to clean up the house today, I used the TRS Prehensor. I massively intensified using it for many tasks since then. Now, I always like to use these opportunities to troubleshoot grips and see where I go with the result.

Wowoweewa!

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Der Cybathlon 2016 wurde bei den Armprothesen von einem Mann mit "Hook" gewonnen [#research #surprise #bodypowered]

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Der Cybathlon 2016 wurde bei den Armprothesen von einem Mann mit "Hook" gewonnen [#research #surprise #bodypowered]; published October 11, 2016, 18:34; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=6670.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1569164356, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Der Cybathlon 2016 wurde bei den Armprothesen von einem Mann mit "Hook" gewonnen [#research #surprise #bodypowered]}}, month = {October},year = {2016}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=6670}}


2 Comments

Ich weiss jetzt nicht, ob Sie das mitbekommen haben. Und ob Sie begreifen was da passiert ist.

Aber am Cybathlon 2016 (Cybathlon, ETH, NCCR Robotics), einer Art Behindertenschaulaufen ohne besonderen  wissenschaftlichen aber dafuer sehr publikumswirksamen Hintergrund [wieso/was:link] mit mehrheitlich durch das Patronat der ETH suggerierten "High-Tech-Hintergrund" gewann ein Mann das Armprothesenrennen, der einen "Hook" trug [siehe detaillierte Griffanalyse, link]. Arschcool, mit 67 ein Senior, dort auch klar der älteste.

Fehlerfrei und schnell.

bodypoweredclothespins

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ADL learning and body powered prosthesis control [paper review]

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - ADL learning and body powered prosthesis control [paper review]; published October 9, 2016, 11:42; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=6484.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1569164356, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - ADL learning and body powered prosthesis control [paper review]}}, month = {October},year = {2016}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=6484}}


Learning to use a body-powered prosthesis: changes in functionality and kinematics. Laura H. B. Huinink, Hanneke Bouwsema, Dick H. Plettenburg, Corry K. van der Sluis and Raoul M. Bongers. Journal of NeuroEngineering and Rehabilitation 2016 13:90.

Abstract [1]

Background: Little is known about action-perception learning processes underlying prosthetic skills in body-powered prosthesis users. Body-powered prostheses are controlled through a harness connected by a cable that might provide for limited proprioceptive feedback. This study aims to test transfer of training basic tasks to functional tasks and to describe the changes over time in kinematics of basic tasks of novice body-powered prosthesis users. Methods: Thirty able-bodied participants and 17 controls participated in the study, using a body-powered prosthetic simulator. Participants in the training group were divided over four groups and practiced during a 2-week-period either direct grasping, indirect grasping, fixation, or a combination of these tasks. Deformable objects with different compliances had to be manipulated while kinematic variables and grip force control were assessed. Functional performance was measured with the Southampton Hand Assessment Procedure (SHAP) prior to and after the training sessions, and after 2 weeks and 3 months retention. The control group only performed the SHAP tests. Results: All four training groups and the control group improved on the SHAP, also after a period of non-use. Type of training had a small but significant influence on the improvements of the SHAP score. On a kinematic level movement times decreased and hook closing velocities increased over time. The indirect grasping group showed significantly shorter plateau times than the other training groups. Grip force control only improved a little over training. Conclusions: Training action-perception couplings of body-powered prosthesis in basic tasks transferred to functional tasks and this lasted after a period of non-use. During training movement times decreased and the indirect grasping group showed advantages. It is advisable to start body-powered training with indirect grasping tasks but also to practice hook-object orientations. Keywords: Upper-limb prosthesis, Body-powered prosthetic

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[1] [doi] L. H. B. Huinink, H. Bouwsema, D. H. Plettenburg, C. K. van der Sluis, and R. M. Bongers, "Learning to use a body-powered prosthesis: changes in functionality and kinematics," Journal of NeuroEngineering and Rehabilitation, vol. 13, iss. 1, pp. 1-12, 2016.
[Bibtex]
@Article{Huinink2016,
author="Huinink, Laura H. B.
and Bouwsema, Hanneke
and Plettenburg, Dick H.
and van der Sluis, Corry K.
and Bongers, Raoul M.",
title="Learning to use a body-powered prosthesis: changes in functionality and kinematics",
journal="Journal of NeuroEngineering and Rehabilitation",
year="2016",
volume="13",
number="1",
pages="1--12",
abstract="Little is known about action-perception learning processes underlying prosthetic skills in body-powered prosthesis users. Body-powered prostheses are controlled through a harness connected by a cable that might provide for limited proprioceptive feedback. This study aims to test transfer of training basic tasks to functional tasks and to describe the changes over time in kinematics of basic tasks of novice body-powered prosthesis users.",
issn="1743-0003",
doi="10.1186/s12984-016-0197-7",
url="http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12984-016-0197-7"
}
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