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Category: EC lumberjack and hauling

BLUE LIGHT SPECIAL - Hammer use to hammer nails, with "bionic" prosthetic hand, poses tricky Catch-22 for Cybathlon 2020 [review]

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - BLUE LIGHT SPECIAL - Hammer use to hammer nails, with "bionic" prosthetic hand, poses tricky Catch-22 for Cybathlon 2020 [review]; published April 20, 2019, 10:28; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=9594.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1569195706, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - BLUE LIGHT SPECIAL - Hammer use to hammer nails, with "bionic" prosthetic hand, poses tricky Catch-22 for Cybathlon 2020 [review]}}, month = {April},year = {2019}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=9594}}


The Cybathlon 2020 race rules confront us with two interesting Catch-22 aspects:

-hammering (if not other dangerous) activity that is not endorsed by "bionic" hand manufacturers

-use of damaged / perforated covers, not endorsed by Ossur [link]

A hammer, particularly a cheap or small one, even more so than a heavy dangerous "real" hammer, is an unlikely tool to use with an ~80 000 USD myoelectric "bionic" device that is specifically built to sustain only the lightest of work. And the subject of hammering, technically, as arm amputee with a prosthetic arm, has become relevant since the Cybathlon 2020 directors [link] have taken it upon themselves to make it a "discipline".

STOP - HAMMER TIME?

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How to apply wood screws in series - demonstration, difficulties [bench work]

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - How to apply wood screws in series - demonstration, difficulties [bench work]; published October 26, 2018, 14:52; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=8717.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1569195706, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - How to apply wood screws in series - demonstration, difficulties [bench work]}}, month = {October},year = {2018}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=8717}}


I happily cut and mounted two wooden boards into a pre-existing shelf frame. For that, a series of wood screws were put into place.

If you are interested in mount, assembly, and screws, read these earlier posts, too:

Dismantling, loading, transporting, unloading and reassembling shelf [bimanual, activity] {illustration, a peek into the life of a person with a handicap}

 

Drill a screw [1-handed way]

The ultimate bimanual task - the IKEA Pax wardrobe system with gliding doors [tricks,tips and yeehaw]

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Case-study of a user-driven prosthetic arm design: bionic hand versus customized body-powered technology in a highly demanding work environment [article out]

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Case-study of a user-driven prosthetic arm design: bionic hand versus customized body-powered technology in a highly demanding work environment [article out]; published January 4, 2018, 14:29; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=8066.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1569195706, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Case-study of a user-driven prosthetic arm design: bionic hand versus customized body-powered technology in a highly demanding work environment [article out]}}, month = {January},year = {2018}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=8066}}


 


This is a blog post of one of the rare focused and well based scientific journal articles that really explains how real work, body powered and myoelectric arms relate and go together for a unilateral right below elbow amputee in a physically demanding work environment.

The prior presentation of this paper [poster at Cybathlon symposium 2016], which had been more pragmatically worded (with me thinking people would know anyway), this was now written up as article and published. During that process, the reviewers clearly made great points of all kinds of aspects I never knew were not sky clear to everyone.

So maybe, writing a ~ 30 page case study with > 210 references does clarify stuff, at least potentially and for those that actually read it. But possibly, it still requires attention to even just read it.

Knowledge does not come easy, Highlander! (Nakano, in: Highlander III The Final Dimension)

 

If you are more interested in visionary posts, read about the gadget features of the prosthetic arm in Kingsmen: The Golden Circle [link]. And technically, myoelectric control did have it coming. That technology remained uncool for four decades [link].

Publication [link]

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Trimming hedges with Hosmer 6 work hook and 2,7 kg cutter in 37 deg C sunny summer [achievement / benchmark report]

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Trimming hedges with Hosmer 6 work hook and 2,7 kg cutter in 37 deg C sunny summer [achievement / benchmark report]; published July 4, 2015, 23:33; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=5013.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1569195706, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Trimming hedges with Hosmer 6 work hook and 2,7 kg cutter in 37 deg C sunny summer [achievement / benchmark report]}}, month = {July},year = {2015}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=5013}}


Bimanual activities that require a prosthetic arm (one with industrial qualities) often times evade the prosthetist, the societal arm chair citizen, the academic researchers, the media makers that "use" amputees as stereotypes, in many aspects - one risks to overlook the simple glory, the sunshine that goes with doing it, the hardness of it, the pride. And the fact that it requires putting one's mind to something that is not just as self understood as it may appear.

What seems to be never considered is the fact that I really need a prosthetic arm for actual bimanual activities. It is for these situations where there is a need to work two-handedly, where a prosthetic arm attains a deeper relevance and importance. And it is not just me, that as a need there, actually. That is the type of stuff one generally needs a prosthetic arm for. Those activities are the ones where insurances usually tend to agree to pay for a prosthetic arm - a prosthetic arm that works through these tasks, mind you: hard work, repetitive work, two hands required, very hot, very cold, dangerous. Leaving the amputee totally intact, by the way.

Operating a hedge cutter is just not possible, safe, or easy with just one hand. In other words, we talk about real work. And no, you cannot "just put your mind to it". Sure with a small tiny clipper you can approximate the sound and feel - but with 2-3 kg and overhead work with a long powerful cutter, one-handed is a big risk, and operating the switch together with directing the blade is very hard.

That, as opposed to drinking coffee, reading news paper, just going for lunch with a food tray, cutting pizza or meat, shopping with bags or baskets, tying shoe laces, talk past a Bialetti when making remarks about "making coffee", opening a fridge, wearing correctly sized trousers, walking a dog, drinking alcohol, or such  - all of these work with a Becker hand, with a passive arm, with a hook or without prosthesis quite well, too.

Not, like, hedge cutting. This requires, like, a real prosthetic arm. It cannot be done without prosthetic arm, with a passive arm, with the "bionic" stuff (their control paradigm is just not safe for that type of work), certainly not with "3d printed" gadgetry that risks to scratch up your stump in no time. I talk about reliability, comfort, overuse, asymmetry, grip function, the stuff that hopefully, my real sustainable living future is made of.

To show what is required, or done, with a prosthetic arm in 2015, I cut the outer and inner perimeter of my hedges in the early afternoon of what turned out to be the hottest day in July in Switzerland since a long time, at over 37 deg C, using a Bosch AHS 55-16 (2,7kg) 450W electric cutter and a super tweaked body powered prosthetic arm with a Hosmer model 6 (back lock containing) work hook. The work contains overhead as well as low down feet height cutting.

 

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Hot Summer - trimming the hedge [V2P / Puppchen wrist real life test: passed]

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Hot Summer - trimming the hedge [V2P / Puppchen wrist real life test: passed]; published July 16, 2010, 12:13; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=333.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1569195706, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Hot Summer - trimming the hedge [V2P / Puppchen wrist real life test: passed]}}, month = {July},year = {2010}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=333}}


1 Comment

With around 35 degrees C and sunshine, I figured it was time to trim my hedges. It's a pride and show performance thing to do that myself. So I did.

I applied ample antiperspirant spray on my stump first. That would be to limit sweating underneath the silicone liner. I was not in the mood to go back and forth cleaning the stump from profuse sweating.

Then I taped the safety latch of my machine into the "pressed" position to allow for left-handed only operation (don't try this at home, kids).

After that I went for it, using a V2P Prehensor (this time a model made from very sturdy plastic) and one of our new PUPP+CH+EN wrist units.

The work contained two hours of full height trimming (ground to overhead level) in full summer sun / heat.

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