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Category: Toughware Equilux

Adapting mountain bike (CUBE ACID 29", 2019) for left handed use [photos]

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Adapting mountain bike (CUBE ACID 29", 2019) for left handed use [photos]; published August 10, 2019, 10:17; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=9900.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1569187005, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Adapting mountain bike (CUBE ACID 29", 2019) for left handed use [photos]}}, month = {August},year = {2019}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=9900}}


"Last year, South Africa's Greg Minnaar (Santa Cruz Syndicate), a three-time UCI World Champion, won a record extending 20th Downhill World Cup in Fort William, Scotland. What made these wins unique was that they were the first World Cup events to be won on a bike with 29" wheels. (..) So does this mean the debate is over, and 29" wheels have replaced 27.5" ones? Not so fast!"-- Thinking about wheels? Michal Cerveny [UCI news]

As my trusted old Cube bike died due to age (profuse hydraulic leaks, spare parts > 1 month away, while on bike holidays) it was clear I had to replace it. So I bought the useful (but not overly expensive) CUBE ACID, with 29" wheels, model year 2019, for something over 900 Euros. The dealer gave me a lower price than the indicated / recommended one.

More history is here [link] with my coolest bike mod so far being the Colnago road bike with switched Ultegra levers [link].

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Understanding and informing design issues of a prosthetic arm for below elbow amputation by way of "taxonomy" [literature review, reality check]

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Understanding and informing design issues of a prosthetic arm for below elbow amputation by way of "taxonomy" [literature review, reality check]; published July 26, 2018, 21:18; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=7651.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1569187005, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Understanding and informing design issues of a prosthetic arm for below elbow amputation by way of "taxonomy" [literature review, reality check]}}, month = {July},year = {2018}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=7651}}


The academic and industrial attempts to approach prosthetic arms so far have been met with less success than the providers must have hoped for. Far less, in fact so little that we wonder what is going on.

Possibly, design issues are the key to this as however vaguely put, some analytic approach needs to inform better design - but how to really inform better design from issues based on analysis? What is a suitable analysis? If we cannot see any better designs anywhere in practice, real life, then what is the analysis worth? Can we analyze analyses to get a better understanding of what might be going on there?

We might best start with what we know to be true.

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3D-print molded Protosil RTV 245 (durometer shore 40A) silicone covers for Toughware Equilux [proof of concept, demo of "bionic" grip]

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - 3D-print molded Protosil RTV 245 (durometer shore 40A) silicone covers for Toughware Equilux [proof of concept, demo of "bionic" grip]; published February 4, 2018, 11:50; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=8248.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1569187005, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - 3D-print molded Protosil RTV 245 (durometer shore 40A) silicone covers for Toughware Equilux [proof of concept, demo of "bionic" grip]}}, month = {February},year = {2018}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=8248}}


It is sometimes more fun to present the technical results before or even instead of explaining exactly why.  So in short, I 3d-designed and then printed molds to make grip covers for really serious grip performance of a Toughware Equilux device.

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Case-study of a user-driven prosthetic arm design: bionic hand versus customized body-powered technology in a highly demanding work environment [article out]

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Case-study of a user-driven prosthetic arm design: bionic hand versus customized body-powered technology in a highly demanding work environment [article out]; published January 4, 2018, 14:29; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=8066.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1569187005, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Case-study of a user-driven prosthetic arm design: bionic hand versus customized body-powered technology in a highly demanding work environment [article out]}}, month = {January},year = {2018}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=8066}}


 


This is a blog post of one of the rare focused and well based scientific journal articles that really explains how real work, body powered and myoelectric arms relate and go together for a unilateral right below elbow amputee in a physically demanding work environment.

The prior presentation of this paper [poster at Cybathlon symposium 2016], which had been more pragmatically worded (with me thinking people would know anyway), this was now written up as article and published. During that process, the reviewers clearly made great points of all kinds of aspects I never knew were not sky clear to everyone.

So maybe, writing a ~ 30 page case study with > 210 references does clarify stuff, at least potentially and for those that actually read it. But possibly, it still requires attention to even just read it.

Knowledge does not come easy, Highlander! (Nakano, in: Highlander III The Final Dimension)

 

If you are more interested in visionary posts, read about the gadget features of the prosthetic arm in Kingsmen: The Golden Circle [link]. And technically, myoelectric control did have it coming. That technology remained uncool for four decades [link].

Publication [link]

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Toughware Equilux - new VO (voluntary opening) / VC (voluntary closing) body powered device - industrial grip pads [concept, beta]

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Toughware Equilux - new VO (voluntary opening) / VC (voluntary closing) body powered device - industrial grip pads [concept, beta]; published August 17, 2017, 20:15; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=7569.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1569187005, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Toughware Equilux - new VO (voluntary opening) / VC (voluntary closing) body powered device - industrial grip pads [concept, beta]}}, month = {August},year = {2017}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=7569}}


Read about the Toughware Equilux here. All prosthetic hooks, prehensors or grippers lack the option of using industrial grip pads. Pads that are readily available, cheap, durable and that the user can easily switch.

And grip pads and grip gloves are a real issue. As posted before, grip pads must be soft,  possible to clean, easy and cheap to replace and convenient. These requirements are in part mutually exclusive. With the knife holding issue of the Equilux, what easier than to mount some standard bike rim brake pads and take it from there.

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Toughware Equilux - new VO (voluntary opening) / VC (voluntary closing) body powered device - first usage report [NEW PRODUCT]

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Toughware Equilux - new VO (voluntary opening) / VC (voluntary closing) body powered device - first usage report [NEW PRODUCT]; published August 13, 2017, 20:06; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=7462.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1569187005, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Toughware Equilux - new VO (voluntary opening) / VC (voluntary closing) body powered device - first usage report [NEW PRODUCT]}}, month = {August},year = {2017}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=7462}}


I was offered the privilege to provide a first usage test and report for a new body powered device. This device allows an "on the fly" switch between VC (voluntary closing) and VO (voluntary opening) control mode.

If you use a prosthetic arm recreationally, for fun, for "the little things that count", such as opening the odd envelope, holding the odd water bottle while filling it with tap water, or pushing the odd knob on your coffee machine, then it probably does not matter what device you wear, or how it would hold up. But if you usually demand performances of your prosthesis that are in the domain of the "unreal", the difficult to cover for existing devices, then having a terminal device that allows on the fly switching between these two control modes really is a big thing. It means that I can switch between the most popular passive grasp mode (VO) - used to carry or hold on to items without thinking - and the most powerful dynamic and forceful grasp mode that ever exists for prosthetic arms (VC).

The device is called "Equilux" and it is (or will be) manufactured by Toughware PRX.

Toughware PRX
2514 West 104th Circle
Westminster, Colorado 80234-3508
Telephone:303-635-1619
FAX:303-635-1621
E-mail: info@toughwareprx.com

An outstanding feature is that the device also provides for the fact that normally, VO works better with slightly longer control cables, whereas the VC system requires mildly shorter ones. This device's flip / switch design does away with this by way of clever design. So with one good control cable length, you are set.

As a further feature, it contains an interface for exchangeable grip pads. As we will see, this is a relevant aspect, that will have to be followed up in the future.

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