expletive-ethereal
expletive-ethereal
expletive-ethereal
expletive-ethereal

Category: Daily training

Wie baue ich ein Fahrrad / Velo um für das Fahren mit einseitiger Armamputation? [Erfahrungsberichte / Vorschläge / Anleitung]

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Wie baue ich ein Fahrrad / Velo um für das Fahren mit einseitiger Armamputation? [Erfahrungsberichte / Vorschläge / Anleitung]; published August 29, 2019, 16:36; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=10034.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1574228517, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Wie baue ich ein Fahrrad / Velo um für das Fahren mit einseitiger Armamputation? [Erfahrungsberichte / Vorschläge / Anleitung]}}, month = {August},year = {2019}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=10034}}


Für das Fahrradfahren mit Armamputation (bei mir: Unterarmamputation rechts) habe ich inzwischen einige praktische Erfahrungen gesammelt. Diese sind hier zusammengestellt.

Read More

ADL learning and body powered prosthesis control [paper review]

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - ADL learning and body powered prosthesis control [paper review]; published October 9, 2016, 11:42; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=6484.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1574228517, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - ADL learning and body powered prosthesis control [paper review]}}, month = {October},year = {2016}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=6484}}


Learning to use a body-powered prosthesis: changes in functionality and kinematics. Laura H. B. Huinink, Hanneke Bouwsema, Dick H. Plettenburg, Corry K. van der Sluis and Raoul M. Bongers. Journal of NeuroEngineering and Rehabilitation 2016 13:90.

Abstract [1]

Background: Little is known about action-perception learning processes underlying prosthetic skills in body-powered prosthesis users. Body-powered prostheses are controlled through a harness connected by a cable that might provide for limited proprioceptive feedback. This study aims to test transfer of training basic tasks to functional tasks and to describe the changes over time in kinematics of basic tasks of novice body-powered prosthesis users. Methods: Thirty able-bodied participants and 17 controls participated in the study, using a body-powered prosthetic simulator. Participants in the training group were divided over four groups and practiced during a 2-week-period either direct grasping, indirect grasping, fixation, or a combination of these tasks. Deformable objects with different compliances had to be manipulated while kinematic variables and grip force control were assessed. Functional performance was measured with the Southampton Hand Assessment Procedure (SHAP) prior to and after the training sessions, and after 2 weeks and 3 months retention. The control group only performed the SHAP tests. Results: All four training groups and the control group improved on the SHAP, also after a period of non-use. Type of training had a small but significant influence on the improvements of the SHAP score. On a kinematic level movement times decreased and hook closing velocities increased over time. The indirect grasping group showed significantly shorter plateau times than the other training groups. Grip force control only improved a little over training. Conclusions: Training action-perception couplings of body-powered prosthesis in basic tasks transferred to functional tasks and this lasted after a period of non-use. During training movement times decreased and the indirect grasping group showed advantages. It is advisable to start body-powered training with indirect grasping tasks but also to practice hook-object orientations. Keywords: Upper-limb prosthesis, Body-powered prosthetic

Read More

[1] [doi] L. H. B. Huinink, H. Bouwsema, D. H. Plettenburg, C. K. van der Sluis, and R. M. Bongers, "Learning to use a body-powered prosthesis: changes in functionality and kinematics," Journal of NeuroEngineering and Rehabilitation, vol. 13, iss. 1, pp. 1-12, 2016.
[Bibtex]
@Article{Huinink2016,
author="Huinink, Laura H. B.
and Bouwsema, Hanneke
and Plettenburg, Dick H.
and van der Sluis, Corry K.
and Bongers, Raoul M.",
title="Learning to use a body-powered prosthesis: changes in functionality and kinematics",
journal="Journal of NeuroEngineering and Rehabilitation",
year="2016",
volume="13",
number="1",
pages="1--12",
abstract="Little is known about action-perception learning processes underlying prosthetic skills in body-powered prosthesis users. Body-powered prostheses are controlled through a harness connected by a cable that might provide for limited proprioceptive feedback. This study aims to test transfer of training basic tasks to functional tasks and to describe the changes over time in kinematics of basic tasks of novice body-powered prosthesis users.",
issn="1743-0003",
doi="10.1186/s12984-016-0197-7",
url="http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12984-016-0197-7"
}

The Cybathlon as iconic Trash Culture modern day Circus show: arm amputees, arms race and technical considerations regarding specific applicants [proper research domain assignment, pre-race evaluation of critical check points, detailed in-race grip analysis, cultural domain considerations, gonzo race report]

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - The Cybathlon as iconic Trash Culture modern day Circus show: arm amputees, arms race and technical considerations regarding specific applicants [proper research domain assignment, pre-race evaluation of critical check points, detailed in-race grip analysis, cultural domain considerations, gonzo race report]; published October 7, 2016, 17:28; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=6378.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1574228517, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - The Cybathlon as iconic Trash Culture modern day Circus show: arm amputees, arms race and technical considerations regarding specific applicants [proper research domain assignment, pre-race evaluation of critical check points, detailed in-race grip analysis, cultural domain considerations, gonzo race report]}}, month = {October},year = {2016}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=6378}}


Executive summary

  • Arm amputation is more a social (and complex) than just a manual handicap in many daily situations. Therefore many approaches to dealing with it are social and socially motivated, including hand color. You did land on a right below elbow amputation website, like, apparently, so that is the angle from which this comes. Also we made sure this is the title of this website. Different aspects may apply to higher level and bilateral arm amputation, but that is not the target of this website.
  • Conversely, most actually manual problems are not major. What heavily impacts many unilateral arm amputees after 5-8 years or maybe after 10 -20 years, is the impact of overuse of the intact arm and asymmetry related problems. A rational approach to prevent that is to use prosthetic arms that excel particularly at the heavy to extreme range of physical exposure. Those are typically modern body powered arms. These use well established control principles, but can be made from very modern materials. They suffer from medial representations that are largely negative ("Captain Hook"). Myoelectric arms are termed "high tech" simply because they may contain a battery and motors, but they suffer from a battery of intractable or constrained problem combinations.
  • For that, the ETH has so far not been necessary to add to the field of prosthetic arms, but trash culture approaches have a lot going for them regardless of that. My own practical and pragmatic research (see also below) contains such elements and now, the ETH also is proud organizer of a Circus freak show (which in essence is an event that lacks academic approaches and reduces intellectual participation to staring).
  • Neither the ETH nor the NCCR Robotics ever managed to acknowledge that or develop even the tiniest solution to solve just about anything in that matter (remember the title of this page?). That is perfectly OK as quite possibly, myoelectric arms are uninteresting from an actual researcher point of view once one understands the full scope of problems, and body powered arms are uninteresting because their problems are a combination of mechanics, material science, and context dependent issues that usually require deep insights which is currently performed by a small relatively close knit international community of amputees, developers and researchers.
  • Given their academic background claims, ETH or NCCR based approaches could and should have focused on studying intricate differences and aspects of prosthetic arm success and failure during the Cybathlon competition in all situations, pre-race and in-race. I mean: if you claim you want to do, or push, research, better sit down and work on a really detailed introductory explanation to show that we all see how much you understand what detailed features we are all looking for. I am most definitely all for that, but I do not shy away from weird staring contest evaluations either. These define an amputee's daily reality more than you might like.
  • But to no surprise, the technical research representatives neither prepared, nor carried out, such, so any technical analysis of the race that then was presented to the public to actually increase some real understanding for the effectively present research problems and real world issues so it will never be possible in sufficient detail or write any great scientific paper about it. Or, not from how it looks now.
  • Thus, academically (not industrially, not as bystander, person that loves to stare at arm amputees or spectator), the event of the Cybathlon prosthetic arm race was a thoroughly missed opportunity if not a failure.
  • This does not mean that the Cybathlon as such was meaningless; it just showed that body powered technology (TRS, TRS prehensor) as very calmly and perfectly performed and carried out by a 67 year old man (Bob Radocy) that did not visibly hurry but chewed gum for the whole event left all "robotic" competition behind - while I had warned the organizers from a one-dimensional overly simplistic evaluation two years ago. I had always told them exactly what Claudia Breidbach said in her statement after the finals race: you cannot compare, across various different arm amputation with adapted different devices, what a good performance is. They knew as they had been extensively informed beforehand. The search for what prosthetic arms should be able to actually do well remains ongoing though, the odyssey apparently continues with a Cybathlon 2020.
  • And while any evidence based rational mind would now more than ever (a) want a body powered prosthesis and (b) further research on that type of prosthesis, it was the very clear aim by the organizers to not include these arms in the race at all, until I had imposed myself onto the organizers, had a very serious word with them and convinced them to admit also body powered arms which they did.
  • The Swiss National Foundation (SNF) is strongly advised to look into the intricate aspects of all failures of (a) research opportunities missed and (b) strategic solutions actually needed in prosthetic arm and hand field, (c) appoint very competent coordinators and advisors there and (d) not finance silly "competitions" such as this that do not further science at all or (e) finance more myoelectric nonsense.
  • All the same, the Cybathlon was a great experience in how ETH hype, tech media hype and gadget hand industry hype take a royal tanking against real life based real men, and, if you need a short but intensive read on the reasons why the myoelectric arms missed out today, check my Cybathlon Symposium scientific contribution, you will find there more relevant text than in many other places.
  • I do not hate myoelectric arms. Personally I must have invested more finances into my own myoelectric gadgets than into my body powered components. However, that does not make me blind, dumb or gadget happy. I still test, look, think and analyze. I still work on finding better ways, solutions, parts or usage tricks for both systems. But then, coming from an engineering perspective (funny you come here to read that) - finding the exact problem, identifying the exact issue, has been placed before being ablt to solving it. And the simple beauty of engineering is, that whatever your attempt at covering up your tricks, at the end of the day, the contraption either works, or it does not.
  • While Professor Riener verbally once (1) at the Cybathlon race itself mentioned the fact that cable powered technology won (we were there, see Gonzo report below), they made sure none of that leaked to the Swiss television, or BBC, or newspapers, or IEEE, or other press. They simply buried the fact that they were left eating dust by some very athletic older gentleman wearing a body powered prosthetic arm. Because that is like having someone in sandals and swim trunks run up on Mount Everest. They do not report that as it is seen as putting the other efforts to shame rather than being seen as someone, something, a situation to finally learn from. And that puts massive question marks to the news writers, tech representatives and researchers: is what you do something we have to believe, because quite clearly, facts are not consistent with it? Do you represent a type of religion or belief system?
  • Not all are like that. The Scientific American, a journal that I am a subscriber and reader of since many, many years, reports extremely well, and explains the actual technical aspects of the winning device.
  • The Cybathlon was announced as competition that allows visitors to "understand the issues surrounding disability in a practical way". When not even the organizers understand these issues, and not even in a theoretical way, how on earth can they assume an ability to instruct visitors so they understand disability issues?

Trash Culture, the Cybathlon prosthetic arms race show Circus, and other prosthetic limb Trash Culture approaches

"Mommy, do I have to repeat every mistake others made before me myself?" - "Yes, one can learn so much from mistakes".

Don't get me wrong here.

Trash Culture is a great contemporary experience. If anything, this is what gets people talking. But it is not research or academic. This is not at all a critique, but an attempt to better localize this strange event in context of prosthetic arms, amputation and society.

It is just a Circus.

To unmake it a Circus and Make It a Technical Contest, a bit more attention to detail would have be needed. A lot more attention to detail would have made it a great event. That all was missed.

Now, I will supplement you with the required extra details below to make it a research observation despite the organizers successful attempts to keep it simple, hip, sexy and trashy .... but let that not spoil the fun for you.

boot

Read More

Bimanual activities beyond comfort zone - bike tour over Stelvio Pass [yoo hoo]

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Bimanual activities beyond comfort zone - bike tour over Stelvio Pass [yoo hoo]; published July 5, 2015, 10:27; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=5030.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1574228517, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Bimanual activities beyond comfort zone - bike tour over Stelvio Pass [yoo hoo]}}, month = {July},year = {2015}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=5030}}


Usually, the simple and bare if not almost violent beauty of hard work gets forgotten. This is, when one focuses only on "bionic" arms which seems to be a current societal and academic obsession.

Prosthetic arms are only really needed, however, and that is if one does a truly bimanual activity. That is something one can not really do that well with one arm. Given that other bikers bike one armed, my aging body does a lot better with posture correction on the bike (link) and a more rather than less symmetric posture. With that I use a Mert arm (link) to ride my bike(s) (link) which I do entirely recreationally (link). Recreationally does not mean this is easy, or easy to accomplish, or, mild, or boring, or in any other way accessible for the average pansy boy equipped with the average myo arm. Just so we got that out of the way.

So, last week, I biked up, from Prad (South Tyrolia / Alto Adige, Italy), to the Stelvio Pass (from Wikipedia: the Stelvio Pass (Italian: Passo dello Stelvio; German: Stilfser Joch) is a mountain pass in northern Italy, at an elevation of 2,757 m (9,045 ft) above sea level. It is the highest paved mountain pass in the Eastern Alps, and the second highest in the Alps, just 13 m (43 ft) below France's Col de l'Iseran (2,770 m (9,088 ft)), over the Umbrail Pass, via Santa Maria, Mustair and Glurns back to Prad, where we then attended the swimming pool.

Read More

Mountain bike riding [why not, why, where]

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Mountain bike riding [why not, why, where]; published November 23, 2014, 23:28; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=3728.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1574228517, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Mountain bike riding [why not, why, where]}}, month = {November},year = {2014}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=3728}}


As it appears, I do consider what they call modern prosthetic arms - and I do wonder: what do these manufacturers consider "a life", what do they consider liveable, important, what are goals for them, how do they go about activities? Do they believe I, as the arm amputee they seem to see me as, am but a doll to them? Is becoming a doll what all research tries to achieve these days?

Hans Georg Näder, CEO of Otto Bock - one of the really big prosthetic component manufacturers and one of the biggest companies to technically (as well as in terms of customer service) discouraging people to wear body powered arms - himself is not into motored powered ships. He is not so much into electronic gadgets as in computerized solar powered vehicles or anything like that. He is not into remote controlled helicopters. He is not into new cell phones. Nothing similarly unnerving as the gadgets he tries to promote for us. No. Far from that. Get that: he is into yachts. The manual craft of sailing. That is probably also as close as body powered gets for a person like him, with a somewhat increased body mass index. Now, why would I regard things any differently? Why would Otto Bock not embrace that I see things just as their CEO?

Because one thing is for sure - no one with an osseointegrated or myoelectric bionic hand  is fit for that type of thing. Criss-crossing the country side. Full pull, full push, full vibration, full sweat, all temperatures, full bangs.

Note: you will not get the juicy bits on camera here. Either I hold the camera while riding. Or I really ride the bike also using brakes and all. But for fast riding and downhill rides, I cannot at the same time record the events.

Read More

Summer holidays [fly swimming, jellyfish chasing]

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Summer holidays [fly swimming, jellyfish chasing]; published August 21, 2013, 13:14; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=2017.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1574228517, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Summer holidays [fly swimming, jellyfish chasing]}}, month = {August},year = {2013}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=2017}}


Swimming fly in the Mediterranean. Chasing jellyfish.

Read More

Bedingtes Badeverbot fuer Behindertengruppen [Schweiz, Sperrbezirk Ost]

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Bedingtes Badeverbot fuer Behindertengruppen [Schweiz, Sperrbezirk Ost]; published March 26, 2012, 03:05; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=540.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1574228517, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Bedingtes Badeverbot fuer Behindertengruppen [Schweiz, Sperrbezirk Ost]}}, month = {March},year = {2012}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=540}}


eg·gen·ber·ger(n), v.t.: aufgrund stoerender visueller Anreize sich selbst oder sichtbar Behinderte oertlich/zeitlich trennen. - Nach Heinrich Eggenberger, Schweiz, Erfinder des Bedingten Badeverbots fuer Behindertengruppen.

Read More

Requirements for prosthetic arms in context of chronic overuse and strain symptoms and carpal tunnel syndrome [analysis]

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Requirements for prosthetic arms in context of chronic overuse and strain symptoms and carpal tunnel syndrome [analysis]; published November 10, 2011, 00:50; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=507.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1574228517, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Requirements for prosthetic arms in context of chronic overuse and strain symptoms and carpal tunnel syndrome [analysis]}}, month = {November},year = {2011}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=507}}


2 Comments

Prostheses in the context of limb loss are usually prescribed by medical doctors. Prosthetic arms and hands are prostheses and thus - stay with me here - prescription items.

Of course you can just buy parts for prosthetic arms yourself and after a doctor or prosthetic technician have made some provisions I see no limitations in where you buy rubbers or cables, batteries or gloves.

But some basic decisions - for example, what type of prosthesis, or what specific problems a patient may have and that the prosthetist must know about - are always medical. And it can make sense to treat prostheses as medical specialties for two specific reasons:

  • Two professions - doctors and prosthetic technicians - as well as retailers tagging along seem to look as the art of making and the business of selling prosthetic arms as somewhat unique to their professions. They somehow seem to assume they are the only ones that can do it. With that assumption, however, comes responsibility. It may be a wise idea to remind professionals of these responsibilities. Conversely, if some doctor or prosthetic technician's work causes permanent damage to your remaining arm due to intentionally deceitful counseling, they make themselves liable to all kinds of charges - criminal or civil.
  • Medical education provides rules and decision strategies. If one is to accept a professional basis also for prosthetic arms, then these rules and decision strategies will hold firmly. The first and foremost rule of medical treatment is "PRIMUM NIL NOCERE". That is Latin and it means, that you should most importantly not damage your patient, whatever you do. A second far more pragmatic aspect of medical education is that nowadays, education is a compulsory part of certified professions. In other words, no doctor or prosthetic technician can go there and claim they did not know. In a reverse twist, anyone who prescribes or builds prostheses that do not conform to a pain saving and overuse preventing lifestyle is - by definition - obviously not to be seen as a medical professional.

The ramifications are intriguing.

For many arm amputees, chronic overuse, carpal tunnel syndrome and a painful numb overused remaining hand are relevant, serious, often irreversible and somewhat determining conditions after a few years. The reason, almost exclusively, is that prosthetic arms and usage of these is not taught, administered and checked correctly.

Instead, fatal mistakes are made. Prosthetic technicians then recommend myoelectric arms usually because these are by far the most profitable for them. Also, users tend to be less active with these prostheses and instead continue to overuse their remaining arm, and so they do not damage or even wreck them that much.

However, overuse of the remaining limb is not at all treated with myoelectric arms. Myoelectric or "bionic"arms do not allow for the amount and extent of load balancing of the type of activities that cause chronic overuse in the first place (read below, really).

This is obvious, to start off with. You need a special customized body powered arm to really live life and allow your overused remaining hand to survive. You want to stay away from regular strap type harnesses and ill fitted sockets [such as prize-winning Jonathan Naber's IPT - designed to compress and damage nerves, designed to damage stumps, something that has you better off not wearing a prosthesis at all - - at best to be worn for short amount of time if at all]. And you really want to definitely stay away from heavy anchor type dead weights such as myoelectric arms, as that technology has nowadays taken on a dynamics on its own that is everything else but healthy for the user [link: vicious cycle]. That much, to be frank, is painfully obvious. If that is not obvious to you already now, it may make sense to check my previously visualized usage examples [links: hedge cutting, vacuum cleaner, toilet cleaning, some more ADL activities of daily living, and a lot of other ADL activities of daily living]. None of these can be successfully carried out with a myoelectric arm. The fact of myoelectric arms being useless for real life also was illustrated, last but not the least, at a recent Otto Bock Michelangelo hand demonstration in Zuerich that had the Otto Bock artist chew on cables using his mouth (sic!) rather than using his Michelangelo arm prosthetic when setting up his demonstration computer [link]. Also, my body powered arm weighs 1/3 to 1/2 of a myo arm. That makes a big difference.

Chronic overuse requires true professional doctors and prosthetic technicians - to manage, to prevent and to babysit. And whatever activities a prosthetic arm has to deliver to avoid chronic overuse in your remaining hand (nerve compression and carpal tunnel problems) will necessarily have an impact on what a prosthetic arm will have to look like.

Read More

Shift in activities *versus* Back to previous activities [rant]

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Shift in activities *versus* Back to previous activities [rant]; published October 28, 2011, 23:57; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=498.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1574228517, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Shift in activities *versus* Back to previous activities [rant]}}, month = {October},year = {2011}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=498}}


People measure success of an amputee. They do. According to their own standard, as high or low as these just may be.

So they go and ask, "So, you are back to normal?" "Are you over it?" or "Have you overcome the disability?".

It is like their Golden Standard centers around the age of 24 to 30, and around the stuff one does when one is 24 to 30. I don't think it's a disability thing. It's a question of staying rooted in the Golden Standard Golden Age assumption. It is a late failure to evolve, in a way.

So I do get asked, "So, you'se back to normel?" (as they do ask using slang language).

Read More

Body core strength - LUNOCET 015 - peaceful Lake of Zurich freestyle LUNOCET swimming [summer break]

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Body core strength - LUNOCET 015 - peaceful Lake of Zurich freestyle LUNOCET swimming [summer break]; published August 11, 2011, 13:29; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=468.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1574228517, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Body core strength - LUNOCET 015 - peaceful Lake of Zurich freestyle LUNOCET swimming [summer break]}}, month = {August},year = {2011}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=468}}


1 Comment

I bought myself a LUNOCET 015 monofin [manufacturer] [SciAm article]. Certainly one of the more wicked pieces of equipment for people with too much energies to burn off. It basically is an extremely well designed fin that enhances your body waves and leg kicks that you can then do with a full blast to speed ahead.

People that read this blog know that I find some 30'000 USD or more for a piece of prosthetic arm gadgetry too much. Some people fail to understand why. Buying a contraption is one thing - but seeing what it does to you emotionally and mentally (once you have it) is quite another. Too much focus on ill-guided gadgetry with the wrong gadgets - and you will end up with a serious depression. Maybe it is because there are so many *other* things to do that really fill my heart.

This here is just a small snow flake, on a tip of an iceberg of what there is to do to fill one's heart with the sheer joy of motion. And so one of the things I can do instead of buying an iLimb, Michelangelo hand or BeBionic, is to park my ~ 30'000 USD or howevermuch money in the right spot, and simply use the interest rate to ride off into the sunset, to buy a Lunocet, and / or to go on holidays somewhere outlandish or do some other stuff that's really good for me.

There are folks that - missing a limb - look for replacement for that missing limb to do anything - to go swimming, for other stuff they do. It is not hard to understand that approach but it is not the only approach there is. One other approach that I started to work on is to manualize the rest of the world instead - including other body parts, immediate surroundings and even by including other people for certain moment of assistance for example. One can then pull apart certain aspects of this - posture, tasks, appearance, balance in motion, to find more creative and even more powerful solutions. In fact, the research head of a robot lab highlighted this to me when - upon visiting their lab - he admitted that robotics (or prosthetics) never would solve the task of replacing a human hand, and that already me adopting other people - for company, for sports, you name it - to solve my own amputation based problems - social, practical, et cetera - was the far better solution in many ways than society spending millions on trying to find the perfect robot hand. But the public doesn't know about this, so let us keep it a secret. In a way this confirms my rather simple minded attempts to assemble a really robust body powered prosthetic arm as a simple tool that holds up to daily requirements - a feasible and realistic task, one where there is light at the end of the tunnel. Real joy and fun is found elsewhere - it is, what you do with (or without) these tools.

This is me, doing some peaceful LUNOCET 015 cruises in the Lake of Zurich. Yes, without added push, I am that fast. I already loved butterfly swimming but this really pushes it. This, by far, surpasses the amount of calm joy that can be gotten out of a number of other activities, including purchase of a myoelectric hand. And if someone offers me one gadget, I'd be a fool not evaluate some other gadgets, wouldn't I. Water sports was always something I liked but I never stopped missing my right hand so much than when going full speed with my Lunocet, and that is maybe why this blog entry belongs here, rather than just on some general water fun webpage.

Read More

Occupational therapy for prosthetic hook [LEGO / stop motion]

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Occupational therapy for prosthetic hook [LEGO / stop motion]; published June 15, 2011, 22:59; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=441.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1574228517, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Occupational therapy for prosthetic hook [LEGO / stop motion]}}, month = {June},year = {2011}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=441}}


While this is an animated LEGO stop motion movie (brickfilm) it shows some relevant aspects for occupational therapy for a prosthetic hook.

Read More

Ultimate in Prosthetic Performance Scoring: The EODF End Of Day Feeling

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Ultimate in Prosthetic Performance Scoring: The EODF End Of Day Feeling; published January 11, 2010, 00:06; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=256.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1574228517, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Ultimate in Prosthetic Performance Scoring: The EODF End Of Day Feeling}}, month = {January},year = {2010}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=256}}


Don't worry about any detailed analysis or technical feature, about concise specifications or spring angles. Whatever it is you are wearing or not wearing in terms of prosthetic arms, what ultimately counts is your EODF (End Of Day Feeling).

Read More

Rotator cuff exercises

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Rotator cuff exercises; published May 5, 2009, 00:50; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=172.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1574228517, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Rotator cuff exercises}}, month = {May},year = {2009}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=172}}


1 Comment

Rotator cuff, impingement, shoulder pain, shoulder problems are an issue for many people but particularly for arm amputees. One has to be careful to not overdo it with either both shoulders (800m butterfly style swimming was what gave both of my shoulders the last kick) or with the dominant arm's shoulder (lifting weights, lifting groceries, lifting furniture, etc).

I got into some trouble in December 2008 so I got some physiotherapy. After my physiotherapist started me with some exercises, things got back to normal. Don't forget. One MUST exercise!

Read More

Categories: Daily training Health

Do NOT follow this link or you will be banned from the site!
HTML Snippets Powered By : XYZScripts.com
I footnotes
x2