expletive-ethereal
expletive-ethereal
expletive-ethereal
expletive-ethereal

Category: Science fiction

Prosthetic split-hooks are by far the MORE MODERN concept than prosthetic hands and they did not take long to get vilified [what you all got wrong about history]

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Prosthetic split-hooks are by far the MORE MODERN concept than prosthetic hands and they did not take long to get vilified [what you all got wrong about history]; published March 3, 2019, 23:01; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=9423.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1571742461, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Prosthetic split-hooks are by far the MORE MODERN concept than prosthetic hands and they did not take long to get vilified [what you all got wrong about history]}}, month = {March},year = {2019}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=9423}}


We are told by prosthetic R&D aficionados, by film makers, fiction authors, popular culture and whatnot, that a prosthetic hook (i.e., split-hook) is "old", and a prosthetic hand is "new". Also, we get told that myoelectric arms are very modern in terms of control technology, whereas some recent media and prosthetic manufacturers even called myoelectric control "brain control".

None of that is true, quite obviously, while we realize that reality is rather different. Rather strikingly different, in fact.

Read More

Kingsman: The Golden Circle [movie review]

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Kingsman: The Golden Circle [movie review]; published January 4, 2018, 14:28; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=7967.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1571742461, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Kingsman: The Golden Circle [movie review]}}, month = {January},year = {2018}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=7967}}


The 2017 movie Kingsman: Golden Circle gets it wrong again, and yet, it has so many critical new features we need to review these.

This movie has the capacity to inspire massive innovations, so it would be quite realistic to expect Disney / 20th Century Fox to also finance prosthetic arm development of their vision of what could be.

This then would not be new. Prosthetic industries seem to run after science-fiction role models, with the following examples:

  • Luke Arm [link]
  • Deus Ex Machina arm [link]

Now, this Kingsman: The Golden Circle movie features an amputee, just as the first Kingsman: The Secret Service movie did. There, a leg amputee was featured whereas here, we have an arm amputee with us.

Stereotypically, the arm amputee, again, is the villain.

Stereotypically, the arm amputee lacks assertion, self assertion or expression of relevant emotions, and ever so stereotypically, the arm amputee villain is killed in due process of the storyline.

Stereotypically as well, the actor himself is not an amputee - which, from view point of directing or producing and surely watching this movie, is definitely wrong. A movie industry that cannot rely on amputee actors for amputee roles clearly defies its purpose on more than one level.

However, one cannot say that lack of authenticity with respect to the amputee character is a valid point of critique in this Kingsman film. This is almost pure visual fairytale telling.

And despite all attempts to be ridiculous and detached from a real world, and despite the usual stereotypical placement of an arm amputee in this movie, Kingsman: The Golden Circle has cool gadget features, that some day we want to see on real prosthetic arms.

So the movie deserves a close look from viewpoint of arm amputee prosthetics despite the usual concerns.

Read More

Prosthetic Envy (discussion panel roundup)

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Prosthetic Envy (discussion panel roundup); published June 1, 2016, 12:47; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=6090.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1571742461, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Prosthetic Envy (discussion panel roundup)}}, month = {June},year = {2016}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=6090}}


On Tuesday May 31st, a discussion with the subject "prosthetic envy" took place organized by "Virtual Futures" in London (UK), allowing protagonists of our time to express their views.

Read More

Meta skin for invisibility cloak [sci fi]

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Meta skin for invisibility cloak [sci fi]; published March 9, 2016, 23:04; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=5799.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1571742461, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Meta skin for invisibility cloak [sci fi]}}, month = {March},year = {2016}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=5799}}


In a weird twist of fate we could have new technologies combined for results that are NOT anticipated.

Meta skin for invisibility cloaks is out now. Grab some before it disappears - bwahaha.

Read More

Artificial fingertip senses textures and sends signal to arm amputee [wow]

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Artificial fingertip senses textures and sends signal to arm amputee [wow]; published March 8, 2016, 21:26; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=5791.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1571742461, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Artificial fingertip senses textures and sends signal to arm amputee [wow]}}, month = {March},year = {2016}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=5791}}


Artificial fingertip senses textures and sends signal to arm amputee who has neural interface implanted.

Wow!

Read More

What to do once your arm has mindboggling amounts of DOF but your stump can only address 2-3 ? [tech scifi stuff]

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - What to do once your arm has mindboggling amounts of DOF but your stump can only address 2-3 ? [tech scifi stuff]; published March 8, 2016, 19:08; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=5779.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1571742461, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - What to do once your arm has mindboggling amounts of DOF but your stump can only address 2-3 ? [tech scifi stuff]}}, month = {March},year = {2016}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=5779}}


Currently, media are swamped with the display of what they call "phantom limb project" (really not the first time that someone uses "phantom" for a prosthetic arm; read about my Becker Phantom hand from 3 years ago right here). So apparently, some prosthetic technician spent major amounts of time trying to construct this computer game look-a-like arm to a degree where its user apparently considers that he is a cyborg with an additional "cyborg mother", as if prosthetic parts have parents, too. Yeah, and my website also has a "cyborg father". If you listen for him, you might hear him breathe, "...khhhhh-ccccchhhhhhhhh-khhhhhhh-czzzzzh...".

dvader

Where is Amber Case, when we need her.

Now, while that Metal Gear inspired prosthetic arm design worn by James Young certainly does not look like it is going to wreck major brick walls any time soon, they might explore entirely different aspects of such equipment.

Read More

Graphene-based neural interfaces are a first promising method to interfacing directly with our nerves [science]

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Graphene-based neural interfaces are a first promising method to interfacing directly with our nerves [science]; published February 26, 2016, 15:41; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=5712.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1571742461, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Graphene-based neural interfaces are a first promising method to interfacing directly with our nerves [science]}}, month = {February},year = {2016}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=5712}}


From [1]:

Connecting technical conductive materials - as in: wires - to nerve cells - as in: spine, brain, peripheral nerves - is important to develop prosthetic devices where interfacing surfaces should only minimally disturb the nerve cells and surrounding tissues.

starwarshand

Current materials are tungsten microwire electrodes or silicone based electrode arrays that represent a long-term trauma and that elicit a long-term inflammation. Typical long-term issues are the formation of an insulating tissue layer around the implanted electrodes, the so-called "glial scar". Not only is the glial scar with concomitant long term inflammation a health issue per se, also the SNR (signal-to-noise ratio) deteriorates until the electrode entirely fails.

Read More

[1] A. Fabbro, D. Scaini, V. Leon, E. Vázquez, G. Cellot, G. Privitera, L. Lombardi, F. Torrisi, F. Tomarchio, F. Bonaccorso, and others, "Graphene-Based Interfaces do not Alter Target Nerve Cells," ACS nano, 2015.
[Bibtex]
@article{fabbro2015graphene,
  title={Graphene-Based Interfaces do not Alter Target Nerve Cells},
  author={Fabbro, Alessandra and Scaini, Denis and Leon, Veronica and V{\'a}zquez, Ester and Cellot, Giada and Privitera, Giulia and Lombardi, Lucia and Torrisi, Felice and Tomarchio, Flavia and Bonaccorso, Francesco and others},
  journal={ACS nano},
  year={2015},
  publisher={ACS Publications}
}

Stretchable ​silicon nanoribbon electronics for skin prosthesis [science

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Stretchable ​silicon nanoribbon electronics for skin prosthesis [science
BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1571742461, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Stretchable ​silicon nanoribbon electronics for skin prosthesis [science

New technology now allows for artifical skin that is sensitive to mechanical deformation, temperature and wetness  [1]. From the article:

Sensory receptors in human skin transmit a wealth of tactile and thermal signals from external environments to the brain. Despite advances in our understanding of mechano- and thermosensation, replication of these unique sensory characteristics in artificial skin and prosthetics remains challenging. Recent efforts to develop smart prosthetics, which exploit rigid and/or semi-flexible pressure, strain and temperature sensors, provide promising routes for sensor-laden bionic systems, but with limited stretchability, detection range and spatio-temporal resolution. Here we demonstrate smart prosthetic skin instrumented with ultrathin, single crystalline ​silicon nanoribbon strain, pressure and temperature sensor arrays as well as associated humidity sensors, electroresistive heaters and stretchable multi-electrode arrays for nerve stimulation. This collection of stretchable sensors and actuators facilitate highly localized mechanical and thermal skin-like perception in response to external stimuli, thus providing unique opportunities for emerging classes of prostheses and peripheral nervous system interface technologies.

Read More

[1] J. Kim, M. Lee, H. J. Shim, R. Ghaffari, H. R. Cho, D. Son, Y. H. Jung, M. Soh, C. Choi, S. Jung, K. Chu, D. Jeon, S. Lee, J. H. Kim, S. H. Choi, T. Hyeon, and D. Kim, "Stretchable silicon nanoribbon electronics for skin prosthesis," Nature Communications, vol. 5, 2014/12/09/online.
[Bibtex]
@Article{jaemin2014,
  author = {Jaemin Kim and Mincheol Lee and Hyung Joon Shim and
     Roozbeh Ghaffari and Hye Rim Cho and Donghee Son and Yei
     Hwan Jung and Min Soh and Changsoon Choi and Sungmook Jung
     and Kon Chu and Daejong Jeon and Soon-Tae Lee and Ji Hoon Kim and Seung 
  Hong Choi and Taeghwan Hyeon and Dae-Hyeong Kim},
  title = {Stretchable silicon nanoribbon electronics for skin
     prosthesis},
  journal = {Nature Communications},
  volume = {5},
  pages = {},
  year = {2014/12/09/online},
  entrydate = {2014/12/10},
  abstract = {Sensory receptors in human skin transmit a wealth of
     tactile and thermal signals from external environments to the
     brain. Despite advances in our understanding of mechano- and
     thermosensation, replication of these unique sensory
     characteristics in artificial skin and prosthetics remains
     challenging. Recent efforts to develop smart prosthetics, which
     exploit rigid and/or semi-flexible pressure, strain and
     temperature sensors, provide promising routes for sensor-laden
     bionic systems, but with limited stretchability, detection range
     and spatio-temporal resolution. Here we demonstrate smart
     prosthetic skin instrumented with ultrathin, single crystalline
     silicon nanoribbon strain, pressure and temperature sensor arrays
     as well as associated humidity sensors, electroresistive heaters
     and stretchable multi-electrode arrays for nerve stimulation. This
     collection of stretchable sensors and actuators facilitate highly
     localized mechanical and thermal skin-like perception in response
     to external stimuli, thus providing unique opportunities for
     emerging classes of prostheses and peripheral nervous system
     interface technologies.},
}

Update on fuel cells [dreaming of electric sheep]

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Update on fuel cells [dreaming of electric sheep]; published November 12, 2014, 12:59; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=3689.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1571742461, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Update on fuel cells [dreaming of electric sheep]}}, month = {November},year = {2014}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=3689}}


You can only expect people to really extend their bodies and minds with technologies once these are both affordable and reliable. Wolf Schweitzer, early 2000.

Lack of really useful long lasting mobile energy provisions are a serious restriction not just for prosthetic arms and hands - that lack cripples the whole shebang comprising all electronic prostheses that make our current society [cf. AMBER CASE].

After fuel cells were discussed between 2009 and 2011 as it seems [TOSHIBA], the subject now risks to become forgotten.That is not adequate, as industry kept at it, and currently, devices are actually offered that seem to be both economical and - compared to batteries containing heavy metals - environmentally somewhat friendly. One particular product is offered by BEUPP. Another is called POWER TREKK.

On Extreme Tech [link] we read: "For over a decade, portable fuel cells makers have been promising that they were about to become economical for mobile and remote applications. California-based Jadoo pioneered in the field, with a solution aimed at on-site TV crews and medical applications, but its products never achieved broad success. More recently, smaller units like the MyFC PowerTrekk have entered the market, catering to eco-sensitive consumers willing to splurge on expensive, but low-impact, fuel pucks rather than loading up on less expensive extra batteries. Now, British-company Intelligent Energy is about to take another crack at the market with the hydrogen-powered Upp fuel cell. The Upp is a $200 2-piece device that comprises one half that turns the fuel into energy, aka the “engine,” and the other half that serves as a hydrogen “fuel tank.” Refilling can be done either by snapping off and replacing the tank, or by refilling it."

 

 

UPP

With that in mind, it does not surprise that Apple [news July 2014] - currently drying out on our extended arms, with their new iPhone 6 barely matching hardware specs of my last year's Nokia Lumia 1520 - are more than under pressure to really innovate. To not deliver long lasting mobile power is to deny mobile power.

shelleyminteer

A ground breaking new technology has been developed by Shelley Minteer [link]: "University of Utah engineers developed the first room-temperature fuel cell that uses enzymes to help jet fuel produce electricity without needing to ignite the fuel. These new fuel cells can be used to power portable electronics, off-grid power and sensors."

And even more, the human body might be exploited for electricity [link]: Provided that the funding required can be secured, Iqbal estimated the technology is five years away from commercialization, excluding FDA approvals. “The product could initially be commercialized as a patch, a plastic bandage similar to a motion sickness patch”, he explained. “It will take small amounts of glucose from the wearer’s blood but no oxygen which can be obtained from the outside.” The patch, which would be in the centimeter or even millimeter scale, could be used by first responders or the military to power on-body sensors or GPS devices.

Way to go.

Handiii / exiii myoelectric hand crowd funding [new project]

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Handiii / exiii myoelectric hand crowd funding [new project]; published October 28, 2014, 23:24; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=3652.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1571742461, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Handiii / exiii myoelectric hand crowd funding [new project]}}, month = {October},year = {2014}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=3652}}


The new project "handiii", developed by a team called "exiii", is a myoelectric hand prosthesis which is advertised to be dramatically accessible for people in need. This is a crowd funding project [Japanese link].

Though conventional hands cost more than 10,000 USD, the material costs of handiii are kept within 300 USD by using 3D-printer/smartphone and minimizing the number of motors. Moreover, handiii will extend options for the users. With the aid of 3D-printer, users will be able to choose from various designs based on user's preference or occasion just like shoes and watches nowadays [link].

Read More

Feeling with a prosthetic "bionic" hand [research review] I

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Feeling with a prosthetic "bionic" hand [research review] I; published February 17, 2014, 05:42; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=2800.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1571742461, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Feeling with a prosthetic "bionic" hand [research review] I}}, month = {February},year = {2014}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=2800}}


Interesting new study.

From http://actu.epfl.ch/news/amputee-feels-in-real-time-with-bionic-hand/:

 

Nine years after an accident caused the loss of his left hand, Dennis Aabo Sørensen from Denmark became the first amputee in the world to feel – in real-time – with a sensory-enhanced prosthetic hand that was surgically wired to nerves in his upper arm. Silvestro Micera and his team at EPFL Center for Neuroprosthetics and SSSA (Italy) developed the revolutionary sensory feedback that allowed Sørensen to feel again while handling objects. A prototype of this bionic technology was tested in February 2013 during a clinical trial in Rome under the supervision of Paolo Maria Rossini at Gemelli Hospital (Italy). The study is published in the February 5, 2014 edition of Science Translational Medicine, and represents a collaboration called Lifehand 2 between several European universities and hospitals. (..) The sense of touch was achieved by sending the digitally refined signal through wires into four electrodes that were surgically implanted into what remains of Sørensen’s upper arm nerves. (..) The electrodes were removed from Sørensen’s arm after one month due to safety restrictions imposed on clinical trials, although the scientists are optimistic that they could remain implanted and functional without damage to the nervous system for many years. (..) Just after the amputation, Sørensen recounts what the doctor told him. “There are two ways you can view this. You can sit in the corner and feel sorry for yourself. Or, you can get up and feel grateful for what you have. I believe you’ll adopt the second view.” - “He was right,” says Sørensen.

Read More

University of Washington 2010 - students design prosthetic arms [review / what to do with a 3D printer]

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - University of Washington 2010 - students design prosthetic arms [review / what to do with a 3D printer]; published August 10, 2013, 14:44; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=1976.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1571742461, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - University of Washington 2010 - students design prosthetic arms [review / what to do with a 3D printer]}}, month = {August},year = {2013}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=1976}}


Under the auspices of Joanne Tilley, an arm amputee and artist, and Magnus Feil, professor at the University of Washington, students designed prosthetic arms in the autumn quarter of 2009 with new and definitely interesting results.

As we still ponder new prosthetic arm designs and while 3D printing becomes ubiquitous and when toying around ideas in general, let us re-consider these results.

Read More

Prosthetic culture #3

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Prosthetic culture #3; published August 6, 2013, 06:30; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=1682.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1571742461, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Prosthetic culture #3}}, month = {August},year = {2013}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=1682}}


New things that rock the perceptions of our humanity now are Google Glass - what will it do to us? And Angelina Jolie did get her real breast content swapped for supplemental content to reduce risk of breast cancer. What is the actual value of data that is systematically altered, changed, biased or tweaked, and that really gives us a different basis to judge on? What is the actual value of life given our human bodies are constantly altered on their insides and on their outsides? Where are the lines not to cross in order to avoid becoming social outcasts?

Read More

Do NOT follow this link or you will be banned from the site!
HTML Snippets Powered By : XYZScripts.com
I footnotes
x2