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Category: Support

How to actually pick, choose, decide for a particular type and make of a prosthetic arm [mental flow chart]

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - How to actually pick, choose, decide for a particular type and make of a prosthetic arm [mental flow chart]; published March 6, 2015, 00:40; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=4509.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1571445337, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - How to actually pick, choose, decide for a particular type and make of a prosthetic arm [mental flow chart]}}, month = {March},year = {2015}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=4509}}


So you consider a prosthetic arm. But, what do get?

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New visibility for very old symbols? Viktoria Modesta, Prototype, Channel 4, "spike dance" [media review]

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - New visibility for very old symbols? Viktoria Modesta, Prototype, Channel 4, "spike dance" [media review]; published December 15, 2014, 20:46; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=3883.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1571445337, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - New visibility for very old symbols? Viktoria Modesta, Prototype, Channel 4, "spike dance" [media review]}}, month = {December},year = {2014}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=3883}}


From [link]:

According to Viktoria Modesta, [link], the new video has given her the chance to express some of her more extreme ideas and continue in her fight against being categorized. Along with the video's director, Saam Farahmand, Modesta achieved these aims with the help of Sophie de Oliveira Barata at The Alternative Limb Project – a fascinating venture which creates bespoke, often highly artistic, prosthetic limbs for clients. In the 'making of' film, de Oliveira Barata explains how she created two bespoke limbs for Modesta – one that lights up and has an exposed mechanism (see above), and another that is essentially an elegant spike which Modesta equates to a kind of power dressing. The latter design appears towards the end of the Prototype film in a sequence that brilliantly combines dance, colour and sound design to dramatic effect. "For a long time, pop culture closed its doors on me as an amputee and alternative artist," Modesta explains. "I think people have always found it hard to know what to think or feel about an amputee who wasn't trying to be an Olympian."

Essentially, she is still in the process of counter-reacting to feeling as a victim of society and poor ability, leg wise. The spike does transform her into "something" else. It gives her "special powers". Also, there needed to be a deliberate collision between that "reality" and the one with the surgically cut off leg, as the director says in the "Making Of". Viktoria Modesta says that she tries to "bring some equality" into "the equation". Later the director admits that what she really is trying to do "is the big question". Apparently, she is publicly exploring "the fullest, richest version of herself". Modesta says that she is not considered to have a body that "is healthy in any terms". The director states that the video "is naughty" "because" Victoria "is a naughty person".

 

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Stretchable ​silicon nanoribbon electronics for skin prosthesis [science

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Stretchable ​silicon nanoribbon electronics for skin prosthesis [science
BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1571445337, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Stretchable ​silicon nanoribbon electronics for skin prosthesis [science

New technology now allows for artifical skin that is sensitive to mechanical deformation, temperature and wetness  [1]. From the article:

Sensory receptors in human skin transmit a wealth of tactile and thermal signals from external environments to the brain. Despite advances in our understanding of mechano- and thermosensation, replication of these unique sensory characteristics in artificial skin and prosthetics remains challenging. Recent efforts to develop smart prosthetics, which exploit rigid and/or semi-flexible pressure, strain and temperature sensors, provide promising routes for sensor-laden bionic systems, but with limited stretchability, detection range and spatio-temporal resolution. Here we demonstrate smart prosthetic skin instrumented with ultrathin, single crystalline ​silicon nanoribbon strain, pressure and temperature sensor arrays as well as associated humidity sensors, electroresistive heaters and stretchable multi-electrode arrays for nerve stimulation. This collection of stretchable sensors and actuators facilitate highly localized mechanical and thermal skin-like perception in response to external stimuli, thus providing unique opportunities for emerging classes of prostheses and peripheral nervous system interface technologies.

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[1] J. Kim, M. Lee, H. J. Shim, R. Ghaffari, H. R. Cho, D. Son, Y. H. Jung, M. Soh, C. Choi, S. Jung, K. Chu, D. Jeon, S. Lee, J. H. Kim, S. H. Choi, T. Hyeon, and D. Kim, "Stretchable silicon nanoribbon electronics for skin prosthesis," Nature Communications, vol. 5, 2014/12/09/online.
[Bibtex]
@Article{jaemin2014,
  author = {Jaemin Kim and Mincheol Lee and Hyung Joon Shim and
     Roozbeh Ghaffari and Hye Rim Cho and Donghee Son and Yei
     Hwan Jung and Min Soh and Changsoon Choi and Sungmook Jung
     and Kon Chu and Daejong Jeon and Soon-Tae Lee and Ji Hoon Kim and Seung 
  Hong Choi and Taeghwan Hyeon and Dae-Hyeong Kim},
  title = {Stretchable silicon nanoribbon electronics for skin
     prosthesis},
  journal = {Nature Communications},
  volume = {5},
  pages = {},
  year = {2014/12/09/online},
  entrydate = {2014/12/10},
  abstract = {Sensory receptors in human skin transmit a wealth of
     tactile and thermal signals from external environments to the
     brain. Despite advances in our understanding of mechano- and
     thermosensation, replication of these unique sensory
     characteristics in artificial skin and prosthetics remains
     challenging. Recent efforts to develop smart prosthetics, which
     exploit rigid and/or semi-flexible pressure, strain and
     temperature sensors, provide promising routes for sensor-laden
     bionic systems, but with limited stretchability, detection range
     and spatio-temporal resolution. Here we demonstrate smart
     prosthetic skin instrumented with ultrathin, single crystalline
     silicon nanoribbon strain, pressure and temperature sensor arrays
     as well as associated humidity sensors, electroresistive heaters
     and stretchable multi-electrode arrays for nerve stimulation. This
     collection of stretchable sensors and actuators facilitate highly
     localized mechanical and thermal skin-like perception in response
     to external stimuli, thus providing unique opportunities for
     emerging classes of prostheses and peripheral nervous system
     interface technologies.},
}

Asymmetry due to below elbow amputation and consequences [analysis]

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Asymmetry due to below elbow amputation and consequences [analysis]; published December 10, 2014, 20:10; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=3789.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1571445337, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Asymmetry due to below elbow amputation and consequences [analysis]}}, month = {December},year = {2014}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=3789}}


Asymmetry causes long term problems. Not wearing a prosthetic (at least over a longer time) is not an option. Overuse [link] and back problems are a serious issue. While overuse of the other / remaining / "intact" arm and hand is one aspect, asymmetry is the other aspect.

Both aspects require prosthetic arms to be comfortable to wear, and to be - grip wise, push wise, hold item wise - functional in an everyday sense. Any other type of prosthetic arm will be discarded or not worn in the long run, and thus not offer sufficient function to take load off the other overused extremity.

Both asymmetry and overuse as serious long term problems are usually neglected in current prosthetic arm design.

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Uncanny valley and its vicious impact on researchers, media and amputees [projected vision spaces]

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Uncanny valley and its vicious impact on researchers, media and amputees [projected vision spaces]; published November 11, 2014, 18:42; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=3677.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1571445337, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Uncanny valley and its vicious impact on researchers, media and amputees [projected vision spaces]}}, month = {November},year = {2014}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=3677}}


Appearances and social effects are closely interlinked. As one example, clothes have always had a major impact on social interactions. Read a good book if this is new to you. Along the same lines, even appearances of cars, computers, gadgets et cetera are often heavily discussed. Manufacturers spend a lot of money for looks of consumer goods. If you want to buy a bicycle today, one selling point is the color being particularly robust - even though the frame cannot rust and the color is of really no practical use. So, appearances and social effects are a real thing these days. They create major ripples.

With that, re-enter the uncanny valley.

Appearances are the end-all-be-all for many aspects of prosthetic hands and arms. At first, every now and then, or whenever, you just do not want to stand out as arm amputee, and, with that, you want to look and be enabled. Appearance - looking inconspicuous, looking enabled - every now and so often are a prosthetic arm's sole raison d'etre. Also, and painfully so, that is where prosthetic hands and arms all die that sudden instantaneous all encompassing total death of utter failure. There is just no way to get this really right. Of course, no one ever made an uncompromising attempt at building a realistically appearing prosthetic hand, but then, that problem is intractable. Read a good blog entry about prosthetic arm appearance testing, if that is new to you.

As appearance requirements for prosthetic hands, wrist and arms are massive in their impact overall, it pays well to now dedicate some more attention to this aspect rather than considering the big picture [link].

Because if you cannot get the looks of your prosthetic arm right, you start out as the outcast no matter what. You may not end up there but that is a bit of the problem - negotiating back "apparent" competence. And so from that moment on, the deck of cards is dealt in a totally different way. Look at it like that: if I am already put into the awkward position to explain the ill disposition of my handicapped arm, total wreckage enabled hooks are a far better and plausible display of "enabled" than a high pitched stir of slowly animated fragile 70s B-movie appealing pansy boy hand. That is, if I am already put into that awkward position to explain that.

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Feeling with a prosthetic “bionic” hand [research review] II

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Feeling with a prosthetic “bionic” hand [research review] II; published August 26, 2014, 12:42; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=3350.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1571445337, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Feeling with a prosthetic “bionic” hand [research review] II}}, month = {August},year = {2014}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=3350}}


I had participated in an experimental sensory feedback trial [1-s2.0-S0028393213004144-main]  [1] primarily conducted by two of the authors, a while back. In autumn 2009, to be exact.

Incidentally, I now found the publication on-line, in 2014, to be exact. The researcher, despite me writing several mails (like, in 2010, or, 2011), did not find it necessary to inform me of the publication. The author list contains Francesco Marini, Chiara F. Tagliabue, Ambra V. Sposito, Alejandro Hernandez-Arieta, Peter Brugger, Natalia Estévez and Angelo Maravita.

I guess in research with arm amputee test rabbits such as me, not everyone owes the other one respect. This is living proof why signing up for trials may be total nonsense! Respect may be low, return may be zero, and all we are left with are cryptic riddles and writings beyond reality. Not universally, no, there are really laudable exceptions.

So here, as research test rabbit, further information went lacking. So then, I might just reciprocate this attitude and level of respect. What about a bit of a review about this bit of writing.

I mean, after all, they do complain about amputees not signing up for trials. Do we not wonder why!

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[1] [doi] F. Marini, C. F. Tagliabue, A. V. Sposito, A. Hernandez-Arieta, P. Brugger, N. Estévez, and A. Maravita, "Crossmodal representation of a functional robotic hand arises after extensive training in healthy participants ," Neuropsychologia , vol. 53, pp. 178-186, 2014.
[Bibtex]
@article{marini2014,
title = "Crossmodal representation of a functional robotic hand arises after extensive training in healthy participants ",
journal = "Neuropsychologia ",
volume = "53",
number = "0",
pages = "178 - 186",
year = "2014",
note = "",
issn = "0028-3932",
doi = "10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2013.11.017",
url = "http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0028393213004144",
author = "Francesco Marini and Chiara F. Tagliabue and Ambra V. Sposito and Alejandro Hernandez-Arieta and Peter Brugger and Natalia Estévez and Angelo Maravita",
keywords = "Crossmodal interactions",
keywords = "Visuo-tactile interference",
keywords = "Peripersonal space",
keywords = "Prosthesis",
keywords = "Visuomotor control",
keywords = "Plasticity ",
abstract = "Abstract The way in which humans represent their own bodies is critical in guiding their interactions with the environment. To achieve successful body–space interactions, the body representation is strictly connected with that of the space immediately surrounding it through efficient visuo-tactile crossmodal integration. Such a body–space integrated representation is not fixed, but can be dynamically modulated by the use of external tools. Our study aims to explore the effect of using a complex tool, namely a functional prosthesis, on crossmodal visuo-tactile spatial interactions in healthy participants. By using the crossmodal visuo-tactile congruency paradigm, we found that prolonged training with a mechanical hand capable of distal hand movements and providing sensory feedback induces a pattern of interference, which is not observed after a brief training, between visual stimuli close to the prosthesis and touches on the body. These results suggest that after extensive, but not short, training the functional prosthesis acquires a visuo-tactile crossmodal representation akin to real limbs. This finding adds to previous evidence for the embodiment of functional prostheses in amputees, and shows that their use may also improve the crossmodal combination of somatosensory feedback delivered by the prosthesis with visual stimuli in the space around it, thus effectively augmenting the patients' visuomotor abilities. "
}

Pilot's prosthetic arm comes lose resulting in rough landing [tech analysis, wild guess]

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Pilot's prosthetic arm comes lose resulting in rough landing [tech analysis, wild guess]; published August 20, 2014, 12:37; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=3376.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1571445337, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Pilot's prosthetic arm comes lose resulting in rough landing [tech analysis, wild guess]}}, month = {August},year = {2014}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=3376}}


We all learned that a pilot's prosthetic arm had come lose resulting in a rough landing. From [link]:
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Categories: Support

Photography as right below elbow amputee [technical tips]

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Photography as right below elbow amputee [technical tips]; published May 30, 2014, 20:51; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=1075.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1571445337, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Photography as right below elbow amputee [technical tips]}}, month = {May},year = {2014}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=1075}}


I was surprised to see that (according to a recent news article [link]) an Otto Bock Michelangelo hand was required to reclaim one's role as photographer:

"This Michelangelo is quantum leaps ahead of anything I have ever been able to do before," Wigington said.

The hope is, with training, Wigington can reclaim his position as the family photographer.

(quoted from http://www.wthr.com/story/20111441/indianapolis-minister-first-to-get-revolutionary-prosthetic on Dec 13th 2012). 

It appears that in over some 20 years of being a right below elbow amputee, Dave Wigington has not been able to figure out how to use a camera well, swift, fast and proficiently.

It appears that in over some 20 years, one now requires a particular "bionic" hand to be a family photographer.

This is extraordinary.

See, it took me exactly a day or two after the amputation to figure out that my camera still worked the exact same way. That was before "bionic" prostheses came along.

So there is a big difference between my own experience and between Dave Wigington's experience.

Seeing that there are obvious differences in what people think they can or can not do, I tried to see where the problem might be.

From there, I will illustrate some ways of taking photos singlehandedly, with the left hand, and / or with my prosthetic arm. If Dave has problems, other people may find this instructive. Who knows.  Read More

UNYQ company offering ready-to-order design customization for leg prostheses [new products out]

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - UNYQ company offering ready-to-order design customization for leg prostheses [new products out]; published May 11, 2014, 21:36; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=3019.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1571445337, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - UNYQ company offering ready-to-order design customization for leg prostheses [new products out]}}, month = {May},year = {2014}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=3019}}


The Californian charge towards anything a 3D printer can print now caused UNYQ to open. Weird thing, nothing about this on the website of Fastcompany - usually early to publish what "really" is going on.

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Friction rash [allergy? sweat? skin disease? poor hygiene? no - just using arm up by simple friction]

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Friction rash [allergy? sweat? skin disease? poor hygiene? no - just using arm up by simple friction]; published February 1, 2014, 13:16; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=2727.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1571445337, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Friction rash [allergy? sweat? skin disease? poor hygiene? no - just using arm up by simple friction]}}, month = {February},year = {2014}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=2727}}


1 Comment

I did not realize how important friction - the consequence of objects rubbing against my skin - was until last autumn. Already earlier, I successfully identified a type of eczema as caused by mechanical properties of the prosthetic arm (then, congestion eczema resulted from ill fitting Ossur liners). So maybe the mechanics of prosthetic suspension remains a main source of contemplation for the near future.

Mostly, I would get occasional rashes under the liner, and that was then attributed to poor hygiene, sweat, allergy against the material of the liner, some obscure skin disease maybe or whatnot. A dermatologist prescribed me various types of steroid or non-steroid type anti-eczema creme, and after a while the rash would subside. With treating a rash, one will also keep the stump still, or be generally more subdued, one will by and large avoid dumb maneuvers with the prosthetic arm on, such as moving a room of furniture or so, and delay all these activities to a later point in time when the stump has recovered. So maybe after all, the cremes never were that much help as just staying out of trouble.

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Categories: Skin Stump care Support

Fold shirt [pinch method, under 2 seconds]

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Fold shirt [pinch method, under 2 seconds]; published December 20, 2013, 19:21; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=2665.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1571445337, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Fold shirt [pinch method, under 2 seconds]}}, month = {December},year = {2013}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=2665}}


There are a few instructional videos on how to fold a shirt in a very proficient way [marthastewart][pdf].

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Performance rating of prosthetic options [rational approach / numbers]

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Performance rating of prosthetic options [rational approach / numbers]; published November 23, 2013, 04:08; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=2360.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1571445337, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Performance rating of prosthetic options [rational approach / numbers]}}, month = {November},year = {2013}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=2360}}


We all know that a wrongly built or wrongly chosen prosthetic arm can be more of a handicap than none at all.

Also, we know that pretty stuff may be pretty but at the end of the day, the pain of overuse is what remains.

So how does it all add up?

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ArmWear: Cool Prosthetics - Graduation Report, September 2010, by Marijn Geurts [art / research review]

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - ArmWear: Cool Prosthetics - Graduation Report, September 2010, by Marijn Geurts [art / research review]; published October 29, 2013, 06:04; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=463.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1571445337, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - ArmWear: Cool Prosthetics - Graduation Report, September 2010, by Marijn Geurts [art / research review]}}, month = {October},year = {2013}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=463}}


I was kindly offered to reference, PDF and option to (re-)publish the oeuvre 'ArmWear: Cool Prosthetics - Graduation Report, September 14th 2010' by Marijn Geurts who graduated at the TU Delft with this subject, by way of Dick Plettenburg.

As I pursue a range of art interests in the domain of my own prosthetic arms, I was intrigued to see this piece of work and to see what was made of some of my approaches as the research included some of my 'Red Hand' project (without previously or, ever, consulting me).

I was also surprised to see some of my own photographs and text re-published (rather clearly not taking into account the very non-ambiguous guidelines on my website on how to go about my material).

This, obviously, deserves a closer look and some comments.

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