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Category: Tricks and techniques

Schraube verschrauben [1-haendige Technik]

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Schraube verschrauben [1-haendige Technik]; published February 5, 2012, 17:44; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=532.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1571792667, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Schraube verschrauben [1-haendige Technik]}}, month = {February},year = {2012}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=532}}


1 Comment

[English version]

Es gibt beliebig verschiedene Varianten, wie man 1-haendig Schrauben verschraubt. Magnetische Schraubenzieher. Ein Tropfen Klebstoff. Mit dem Zeigefinger den Schraubenkopf fixieren.

Hier wird die Technik mit Klebestreifen vorgestellt.

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One handed computer and mouse usage [shift or control click]

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - One handed computer and mouse usage [shift or control click]; published January 21, 2012, 23:01; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=527.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1571792667, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - One handed computer and mouse usage [shift or control click]}}, month = {January},year = {2012}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=527}}


I show how I control-click through a list of file with one hand. Shift-click works the same.

- The thumb operates the control key.
- The hand pushes the mouse.
- The ring finger clicks the left (regular button 1) mouse button.

The motions are relatively subtle and relatively precise.

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Disability humor and public ridicule [delineation]

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Disability humor and public ridicule [delineation]; published December 25, 2011, 19:35; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=514.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1571792667, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Disability humor and public ridicule [delineation]}}, month = {December},year = {2011}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=514}}


It is one thing to attract attention, but quite another to generate genuine laughs.

Disability humor just as ethnic or racial humor can be a powerful way to defuse stress and anger and yet, because disability is a permanent problem that marginalizes people in society, telling such jokes - many if not all of them very bitter - is reserved to people with disabilities.

Similarly, racial or ethnic jokes may be told by a member of the group that is made fun of in such a joke - but good etiquette forbids other people to assume such attempts at defusing or relaxing bitter humor and have a go themselves.

It is obvious that there are people that do that all the same. There is obviously something thoroughly wrong with them. Let's try to illuminate the subject.

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Fixing / sewing up boot latch [tech]

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Fixing / sewing up boot latch [tech]; published November 21, 2011, 04:42; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=510.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1571792667, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Fixing / sewing up boot latch [tech]}}, month = {November},year = {2011}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=510}}


I am able to tie shoe laces but since over ten years and for reasons of comfort and style, for economic reasons as well (these last rather long) I prefer boots over other shoes for everyday wear and tear.

A new pair that I got myself recently to replace a pair of boots that was worn out to the point of falling apart quite literally instantly got me into trouble - the latch on the back of the new right boot tore off. The fabric of the latch itself was fine - it appeared to be a problem of the seam that had come loose.

I had taken that boot to the local shoemaker for repair but it turned out that the cheap glue that dude was applying didn't do the trick after all. So between shipping the boot to the manufacturer for any inadequate amount of money and considering a discussion about glue with the shoemaker I decided to give a direct in-house repair some closer consideration.

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Manualization of the body and time and effort spent to implement it [options for people missing an upper extremity part]

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Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Manualization of the body and time and effort spent to implement it [options for people missing an upper extremity part]; published September 11, 2011, 20:37; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=469.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1571792667, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Manualization of the body and time and effort spent to implement it [options for people missing an upper extremity part]}}, month = {September},year = {2011}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=469}}


If a part (or more parts) of upper extremities are missing, absent function can be replaced to a small degree.

Replacing at least some basic aspects of a hand's function with the rest of the body and immediate environment is what upper extremity amputees including myself do every day.

There are a few questions along the road, but other than that, "manualization of the rest of the body" as well as manualization of surrounding environment is what is going on. There are simply no other options and interestingly, problems are similarly in nature regardless of the type of solution one chooses.

When evaluating a prosthetic hand, when doing evaluation of a prosthetic arm or hook, when evaluating myoelectric or ""bionic"" prostheses such as iLimb, BeBionic or Michelangelo by Otto Bock, then this should be considered thoroughly.

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ADL activities of daily living - arm stump only [ANPPN Activites of No Particular Prosthetic Need]

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - ADL activities of daily living - arm stump only [ANPPN Activites of No Particular Prosthetic Need]; published August 26, 2011, 00:10; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=477.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1571792667, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - ADL activities of daily living - arm stump only [ANPPN Activites of No Particular Prosthetic Need]}}, month = {August},year = {2011}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=477}}


1 Comment

Of course one can spend all day theoretically analyzing grip options and comparing different options or, just do it.

It is intriguing to see recent surges of apparent ADL (activity of daily living) demonstrated with so-called "bionic hands" (including Otto Bock Michelangelo hand, iLimb by TouchBionics and BeBionic by RSL Steeper). For the most part, these are not a demonstration of a need to wear any of these hands.

There are people that realize that not all advertising really means the offered solution works. Hand transplants - as useful or useless as some of the new 'bionic' hand gadgets - are known to fail and some people take a while before they verbally and publicly admit that body powered hooks are not as bad after all. As Jeff Kepner said in a video interview - with a hook you know what to expect. The difference still is that 'bionic' hands can be put aside - whereas hand transplants cannot.

Stories like that makes you consider however just how much can be done without ANY prosthetic or transplanted hand. Just to get a feel for the functionality and to fully feel with the extremity.

Videos are at least somewhat non-negotiable, and therein lies their beauty. Conversely you will hate me for the simplicity of (at least some of) these. So below is a demo of actual ADL using the arm stump only. Any of these may be also carried out with a prosthetic arm, but in many instances they work a lot better with 'just' the stump. Old orthopedic surgeons used to say "the best prosthetic arm is the stump itself" and it seems that the extra time my surgeon spent on my arm to fix it up proper and neat was time well spent. I find that the stump he left we with is in fact useful - long enough and sensitive.

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Typing and posture [simple functional anatomy]

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Typing and posture [simple functional anatomy]; published August 25, 2011, 17:26; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=476.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1571792667, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Typing and posture [simple functional anatomy]}}, month = {August},year = {2011}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=476}}


It has been alleged that typing is best done using a "bionic" prosthesis using an "extended finger". So I repost this observation [see post dating back to December 2009].

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Ironing - one handed, or with prosthetic hook or hand [choice of iron]

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Ironing - one handed, or with prosthetic hook or hand [choice of iron]; published July 23, 2011, 13:34; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=459.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1571792667, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Ironing - one handed, or with prosthetic hook or hand [choice of iron]}}, month = {July},year = {2011}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=459}}


A while back, I was asked to come up with footage to document how my prosthetic hook would work (or not work) when handling an iron and when ironing shirts [link].

It was then a question whether re-design of an iron would help people with prosthetic hooks. I have no idea why they restricted the research for industrial design to hooks. After all, there are far more people that live with one functioning hand after, say, strokes or paralysis than there are amputees.

Since then I started to trouble shoot the situation myself and found that with my steaming iron (regular plastic body steam iron), (a) the grip that was made of hard plastic also slipped out of my (non-disabled) hand, particularly when I was not paying attention, mostly because using the left hand for me is still awkward, (b) the iron was heavy no matter what hand or hook I was lifting it with, (c) its plastic housing broke when it fell because it was not built to last.

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Empowering amputees by helping them to be less dependent on others [attention!]

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Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Empowering amputees by helping them to be less dependent on others [attention!]; published June 18, 2011, 14:33; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=442.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1571792667, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Empowering amputees by helping them to be less dependent on others [attention!]}}, month = {June},year = {2011}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=442}}


Empowering amputees by helping them to be less dependent on others - after Haiti, after several US military deployments - apparently has become a big issue of sorts.

Some folks are of the firm opinion that amputees really need prostheses in order to be less dependent on other people. For single below elbow amputees that does not sound true at all.

Fitting, maintaining and repairing prostheses requires time, know-how, tools, materials and money - and as prostheses are special equipment, they are time consuming and expensive. So fitting someone with a prosthesis is, first and foremost, making that person dependent on people (specialists) and money (private, insurance, fund, etc.) as well as training. As these issues are problematic in themselves, fighting (for orthopedic technicians to do an at least halfways acceptable job), fighting (for insurance to pay) and fighting (to get the damages repaired or to repair them yourself) are an integral part of this. Furthermore, conventionally fitted prostheses also have the capacity to damage your health (skin, shoulder) - in some ways considerably - so on top of the aforementioned additional dependencies comes the problem of looking out for, catching and then avoiding damages. All in all, prostheses are an art form, prosthetic parts can be regarded as part of our cultural etiquette, they may help to balance back and shoulders, they may look cool (but not necessarily so), they may convey a sense of technology integration and may show that you can manage with a prop, they may display a certain propensity to expensive living and as that they are part of a luxury lifestyle in themselves that we may take as granted but that is technically a luxury nevertheless - but in no way are they simple solutions to make amputees depend less on others. That, in my experience, is really a wrong concept.

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Occupational therapy for prosthetic hook [LEGO / stop motion]

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Occupational therapy for prosthetic hook [LEGO / stop motion]; published June 15, 2011, 22:59; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=441.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1571792667, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Occupational therapy for prosthetic hook [LEGO / stop motion]}}, month = {June},year = {2011}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=441}}


While this is an animated LEGO stop motion movie (brickfilm) it shows some relevant aspects for occupational therapy for a prosthetic hook.

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Pulling electric cable using stump [tricks]

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Pulling electric cable using stump [tricks]; published June 2, 2011, 18:00; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=426.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1571792667, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Pulling electric cable using stump [tricks]}}, month = {June},year = {2011}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=426}}


When I use my stick blender, I want to rinse it off after using it then clean it. For that I need to unplug it. Of course I could always make sure I wear the prosthetic arm each and every time I mix something up - but then it turns out that just wrapping the cable around the stump twice allows me to nudge the plug out at once.

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Cutting meat using prosthetic body powered arm with hook or hand [ADL]

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Cutting meat using prosthetic body powered arm with hook or hand [ADL]; published March 21, 2011, 01:03; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=387.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1571792667, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Cutting meat using prosthetic body powered arm with hook or hand [ADL]}}, month = {March},year = {2011}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=387}}


It is sometimes asked how this is done. There are many ways, including getting the waiter to get the cook to prepare it pre-sliced (my favorite lazy night out option). But no problem to get it done with the prosthesis.

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Opening a vacuum sealed marmalade jar

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Opening a vacuum sealed marmalade jar; published August 24, 2010, 12:35; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=351.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1571792667, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Opening a vacuum sealed marmalade jar}}, month = {August},year = {2010}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=351}}


Glorious moments in a bloke's life: Opening a vacuum sealed marmalade jar can be a real bitch. I do work out, and I have all the gadgets. I use knives to lift the lid. I use rubber mats to hold the glass between arm and chest. I use heat to expand the gas / air inside the jar. But not all jars give in. There are a few jars that stay put.

You know how to then get rid of excess frustration? Focus your frustrated thoughts around an imaginary candle. Got it? Are the thoughts floating around that candle? Good! Now blow the candle, blow hard. You see where your frustration has gone? See? Pffft, gone.

With that concept in mind I figured the best way to get rid of excess vacuum was to drill a hole into the lid. Pffft, gone.

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