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Category: Prototype development

Carnes arm getting re-engineered by an Australian [news]

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Carnes arm getting re-engineered by an Australian [news]; published June 19, 2011, 19:27; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=444.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1574275266, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Carnes arm getting re-engineered by an Australian [news]}}, month = {June},year = {2011}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=444}}


The Carnes arm here has some previous entries, check them out.

Now, Mark actually visited the man that sold him the Carnes arm 'over Internet connection and friends' (Mark: anytime again : ) Turns out things are now really going in the right direction.

Particularly for transhumeral amputees, I believe the Carnes arm has a lot going for it, but it definitely needs a tune up both in terms of materials and ease of clockwork. With osseointegration, you want light weight and as much integrated function as ever possible. Combining elbow flexion and supination is one really good example of a possibly sensible integration over several joints.

As far as I am aware, even combined hand and wrist motion, leave alone hand - wrist - elbow combinations, are really nothing our current commercial consumer product designers do consider in their current "all things are called now 'bionic'" rage. So as every now and so often, amputees have to look out for themselves.

It really appears that the Carnes arm re-engineering now is underway as I read this hot off the press news. Great stuff.

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Jonathan Naber 2010 $30000 Lemelson MIT Illinois Student Prize winner 2010 [context]

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Jonathan Naber 2010 $30000 Lemelson MIT Illinois Student Prize winner 2010 [context]; published May 29, 2011, 23:34; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=424.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1574275266, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Jonathan Naber 2010 $30000 Lemelson MIT Illinois Student Prize winner 2010 [context]}}, month = {May},year = {2011}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=424}}


1 Comment

Jonathan Naber developed a prosthetic arm that can be built from plastic parts, has no socket but bars and straps and is cheap to build. He also founded IPT - the Illini Prosthetic Team.

Now, I watched his presentation [below] that and went .... hm. Hasn't that been done before? Haven't we heard these third world cheap prosthetic limbs would actually be so uncomfortable to not be worn at all in the developing regions that actually were (un)lucky enough to get them? Best to really start field testing soon.

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Request For Information [prosthetic wrist]

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Request For Information [prosthetic wrist]; published May 28, 2011, 07:28; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=415.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1574275266, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Request For Information [prosthetic wrist]}}, month = {May},year = {2011}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=415}}


Check out this.

I submitted our (non-powered) prosthetic wrist so they can check it out. What I don't get is the externally powered 3 DOF idea for body powered arms - a feature I would never have figured anyone would ever need. But, hey : ) It really seems like no one - no one - today is able to create a research project that avoids batteries and gadgetry. Obviously, the amputee of 2011 in their eyes necessarily must create motor sounds, and go "uaa uaa" at the slightest notion of moving their parts.

Well, if it makes these people happy, be it : )

https://www.fbo.gov/index?s=opportunity&mode=form&id=91ad23b87c9e1b9a1184180f27610b7b&tab=core&_cview=0

:
W81XWH-PRORP-RFI
:
Special Notice
:
Added: May 18, 2011 1:34 pm

This is a Request for Information (RFI) Only!

Issued for: The Peer Reviewed Orthopaedic Research Program (PRORP), Congressionally Directed Medical Research Programs, United States Army Medical Research and Materiel Command

Background: The Peer Reviewed Orthopaedic Research Program was established within the Defense Health Program of the Department of Defense to support research focused on optimizing recovery and restoration of function for military personnel with orthopaedic injuries sustained in combat or combat-related duties. The PRORP is considering offering program announcements to solicit for mature translational and clinical trial research projects, and is issuing this RFI to survey available and/or emerging biomedical technologies that have the potential to address the following focus areas of interest:

A. Prevention and treatment of post traumatic osteoarthritis: Post traumatic osteoarthritis is the most common chronic, debilitating condition of combat-injured Warriors. Most incidences of post traumatic osteoarthritis are caused by fractures involving the joints. The PRORP is interested in mature translational and clinical research aimed at preventing or treating this condition. Preventive measures must consider the battlefield environment constraints (to include but not limited to multiple serious injuries, anticoagulation effects of medication, and limited imaging capabilities for the first 72 hours). Regenerative approaches must be able to repair large cartilage defects that current therapies (such as microfracture and osteochondral transplantation) do not address.

B. Improved outcomes of severe limb injuries: The majority of combat-injured Warriors have at least one extremity injury, most of which are open wounds caused by explosion or gunshot. These injuries are generally more severe than civilian injuries, with infection and nonunion as common complications. Nonfunctional nerves and loss of muscle function are frequent outcomes. Clinical studies on approaches to reduce or treat infection, therapies that heal large motor nerve injury, and novel rehabilitation interventions or orthoses that improve the functional outcomes of individuals with severely injured limbs are needed.

C. Improved outcomes of multi-limb trauma patients: Combat casualties facing multiple major limb amputations or severe limb-threatening injuries requiring salvage techniques represent a small but very important subset of patients. Clinical studies to examine surgical, rehabilitative and psychosocial aspects of coping with and returning to life afterwards; as well as treatment strategies to improve outcomes in these specific patients will be considered.

D. Upper Extremity Prosthetic: Combat-injured Warriors that have lost one or both arms have limited options in reliable prosthetics that are lightweight, easy to control, and flexible. The PRORP is interested in advanced technology that could be used to develop and test a modular, interoperable, three-degrees-of-freedom (DOF), powered prosthetic wrist and one DOF terminal device with accompanying control strategies. Of highest interest is technology that solves unmet clinical needs, with priority given to function, weight, reliability, and durability, rather than cosmetic appearance. Interest is in candidate solutions and prototype systems at the stage of refinement and initial feasibility testing or beyond.

Information Requested: To respond to this RFI, please address the following questions. It is requested that each response address a single focus area. If you would like to comment on multiple focus areas, you are encouraged to submit multiple responses.

1) What novel approaches that meet the above focus areas are sufficiently developed for clinical trial research? Please describe any relevant research of which you are aware, with brief details about each therapeutic or preventive intervention, and the stage of clinical development in progress. If relevant, include information on Investigational New Drug or Investigational Device Exemption status.

2) What novel approaches that meet the above focus areas are not yet ready for clinical trial, but are considered to be at a mature translational research stage? Briefly describe each relevant approach, including status of any animal or observational/clinical validation, technology development, and manufacturing progress. Estimate time needed for additional research and development before clinical trial readiness.

3) With regard to upper limb powered prosthetic solutions, please describe current capabilities to assemble a modular three DOF wrist, specifying the size and weight footprints of each possible configuration in order to evaluate the limitations for fitting based on residual limb length. Briefly describe design of the terminal device and accompanying powering technology. Describe any approaches that capitalize on and augment the features of existing body-powered devices to create an evolutionary externally powered product. Discuss the modularity of the system both in terms of physical assembly and control capability. Responses should include information on the extent to which each technological component of the system has been proven, as well as compatibility across other prosthetic systems and manufacturers.

Response and Process: To facilitate review of responses, please clearly mark which of the above focus areas is relevant to the response. Please respond no later than June 8, 2011. Responses should be limited to 500 words or less, and can be submitted to cdmrp.prorp@amedd.army.mil. No telephone calls please.

NOTE: This RFI is issued solely for information and planning purposes and does not constitute a solicitation or issuance thereof. All information received in response to this RFI that is marked proprietary will be handled accordingly. Responses to this RFI will not be returned. Responses to this RFI are not offers and cannot be accepted by the Government to form a binding contract or award. Responders are solely responsible for all expenses associated with responding to this RFI.

:
US Army Medical Research Acquisition Activity, ATTN: MCMR-AAA, 820 Chandler Street, Frederick, MD 21702-5014
:
Susan Dellinger, 301-619-2090

US Army Medical Research Acquisition Activity

Otto Bock Michelangelo hand DEMO [Gonzo report]

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Otto Bock Michelangelo hand DEMO [Gonzo report]; published May 27, 2011, 12:01; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=416.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1574275266, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Otto Bock Michelangelo hand DEMO [Gonzo report]}}, month = {May},year = {2011}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=416}}


3 Comments

[Find all articles about the Otto Bock Michelangelo hand]

Zurich, May 27th 2011.

Dipl.-Ing. Martin Wehrle presented the Otto Bock Michelangelo hand starting at 9:00 AM in a presentation at our local technical orthopedic service, Balgrist Tec. To that purpose he was wearing one on his right arm. This is my Gonzo report about the event.

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What makes a good grip - gadget for non-disabled people [product]

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - What makes a good grip - gadget for non-disabled people [product]; published April 10, 2011, 14:28; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=394.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1574275266, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - What makes a good grip - gadget for non-disabled people [product]}}, month = {April},year = {2011}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=394}}


Disability is a relative term, as it appears.

One may turn out to be disabled facing a certain task, and non-disabled facing another.

As it appears, seemingly non-disabled people cannot handle all of today's medical containers or connectors too well manually.

So, grip prosthetics enter the world of non-disabled people.

Matthew Ostroff developed Medegrip.

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Physical constrains for prosthetic grip mechanisms [theory and practice]

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Physical constrains for prosthetic grip mechanisms [theory and practice]; published January 3, 2011, 00:18; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=380.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1574275266, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Physical constrains for prosthetic grip mechanisms [theory and practice]}}, month = {January},year = {2011}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=380}}


Obviously, prosthetic grips are a real and - for amputees, not so much for industrial robots - moderately to unsatisfyingly solved problem. From my current view point, this is understandable: there are physical constraints, and working with them requires clear understanding of them.
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V2P Prehensor - general reflection on grip strength and test of multi layered customized claw covers

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - V2P Prehensor - general reflection on grip strength and test of multi layered customized claw covers; published July 26, 2010, 01:29; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=342.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1574275266, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - V2P Prehensor - general reflection on grip strength and test of multi layered customized claw covers}}, month = {July},year = {2010}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=342}}


After reading a scientific article about grip strength, after reflecting about my current experience, I figured it was time for an update on grip strength.

Based on a very nice article of Markenscoff et al. (1990), it becomes clear that to securely grip an object in three-dimensional space one requires a rather large number of fingers if there is no friction at all.

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Mechanically intelligent prosthetic design - microprocessor-controlled artificial foot [U MICH]

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Mechanically intelligent prosthetic design - microprocessor-controlled artificial foot [U MICH]; published February 19, 2010, 19:24; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=287.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1574275266, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Mechanically intelligent prosthetic design - microprocessor-controlled artificial foot [U MICH]}}, month = {February},year = {2010}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=287}}


This artificial foot uses a small battery to fuel a microprocessor controller - but the main energy is stored and then released by walking. This shows that despite all gadgetry being twiddled with in academic research, great mechanically intelligent prosthetic design still can be found.

Links:

  • Collins, Steven H. AND Kuo, Arthur D., Recycling Energy to Restore Impaired Ankle Function during Human Walking, in: PLoS ONE, volume 5, number 2, pages e9307, 2010 [research paper]
  • University of Michigan News Service

(C) Copyright University of Michigan

For prosthetic hands this could indicate that

  • taking advantage of best controls of both body powered and electronically coordinated designs may be better than just using either / or,
  • and there are engineers that are up for it after all.

Learning from industry and industrial design for prosthetic design

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Learning from industry and industrial design for prosthetic design; published February 13, 2010, 15:43; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=285.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1574275266, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Learning from industry and industrial design for prosthetic design}}, month = {February},year = {2010}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=285}}


I have been saying and living (!) all along that a detailed functional analysis necessarily precedes successful prosthetic design.

It also precedes successful design anywhere else. Apple recently revealed the iPad. But listen to how Steve Jobs explains what they did: they analysed what was wrong with existing solutions and then designed and built their new device to specifically fill that niche. And so those of you that kept trucking by extending the old prosthetic design metaphor (build it from cheap crap, make it look neat and sell it for millions to non-disabled company or insurance representatives): go and study and do a detailed functional analysis first. The deeper and more detailed, the more extensive and unforgiving, the better.

But now let us see what Steve Jobs can teach us about that:

Obviously Steve gets it wrong soon with his iPad evangelizing - my netbook is absolutely great, slow, light, cheap and has a very long battery life, it runs PC software which in fact is great - so it does exactly what I want it to do. No way an iPad would be of help. Besides, Steve and his friends at Apple still violate  Telecommunications Act Section 255 so they should have plenty to do until they fixed that mess. But Steve's means to arrive at that conclusion - by seeing what is not good about existing parts - is the way to do it. That is where I think he completely nailed it.

How do we apply that to prosthetic arms that allow for gripping and holding items, most notably the ones operated by myoelectric switches or cable control?

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MSM wrist [legal aspects - file download area]

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - MSM wrist [legal aspects - file download area]; published April 8, 2009, 15:01; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=159.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1574275266, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - MSM wrist [legal aspects - file download area]}}, month = {April},year = {2009}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=159}}


2 Comments

Always, developments with new ideas cause people to get interested in the legal and constructional aspects. The MSM wrist information is posted here.

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MSM wrist [road map]

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - MSM wrist [road map]; published April 8, 2009, 14:57; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=158.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1574275266, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - MSM wrist [road map]}}, month = {April},year = {2009}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=158}}


8 Comments

We started to develop a wrist joint - or a mechanical wrist joint - for my cable controlled arm prosthesis (or body powered arm prosthesis). The wrist joint should contain a quick release mechanism to allow fast switching of hook, hooks, hands, terminal devices, experimental tools or anything of that nature.

If you are interested in the time line of previous and future developments of our MSM wrist, here's the right place to check.

Contact me for further details (email address ~ wuff *@@@* swisswuff.ch).

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MSM wrist 0.1-revision [open prosthetics]

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - MSM wrist 0.1-revision [open prosthetics]; published April 8, 2009, 14:51; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=157.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1574275266, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - MSM wrist 0.1-revision [open prosthetics]}}, month = {April},year = {2009}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=157}}


4 Comments

After an initial prototype was built and after I used it for a while, two major inconveniences (1: inbus screw issue; 2: cable pull direction has to match sprocket design issue) became apparent.

Since our roadmap currently does not provide for a new major MSM wrist release in the near future and since Otto Bock has not announced a comparably sturdy design, we decided to move towards fixing the MSM wrist 0.1 prototype's initial issues.

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MSM wrist 0.1 [prototype, open prosthetics]

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - MSM wrist 0.1 [prototype, open prosthetics]; published March 4, 2009, 15:38; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=113.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1574275266, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - MSM wrist 0.1 [prototype, open prosthetics]}}, month = {March},year = {2009}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=113}}


5 Comments

After my problems with rather small bolts and a cylindrical spring-based squeeze-hold mechanism for wrist/connector unit (Otto Bock part 10V9/10V10, cost 429.95 CHF) and after I did not detect any subsequent technical innovation being mentioned in the answers I obtained from the manufacturer (Otto Bock), we decided to move on to build our own setup.

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