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Category: Impact of visible disability on non-disabled people

How is "John without arms" an ableist derogatory Brazilian / Portuguese idiom that directly attributes ignorance and laziness to disability and then uses it a technical amputation descriptor to denote the lazy or ignorant?

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - How is "John without arms" an ableist derogatory Brazilian / Portuguese idiom that directly attributes ignorance and laziness to disability and then uses it a technical amputation descriptor to denote the lazy or ignorant?; published June 20, 2019, 05:33; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=9683.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1571228948, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - How is "John without arms" an ableist derogatory Brazilian / Portuguese idiom that directly attributes ignorance and laziness to disability and then uses it a technical amputation descriptor to denote the lazy or ignorant?}}, month = {June},year = {2019}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=9683}}


João sem braço ("armless John") is a Brazilian or Portuguese idiom that is used as an epithet for an ignorant and lazy person.

As that in itself is hardly a positive attribute, it is relevant to understand the position of amputees in society, their individual and collective role, in order to see how this is a very ableist and thus derogatory way to formulate the attribute of ignorant or lazy.

Can you open the zipper of my pants please? - Why, do you need to go to the bathroom? - No... (from [link])
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Was ist mit Cybathlon@SCHOOL moeglicherweise problematisch?

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Was ist mit Cybathlon@SCHOOL moeglicherweise problematisch?; published March 2, 2019, 11:39; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=9404.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1571228948, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Was ist mit Cybathlon@SCHOOL moeglicherweise problematisch?}}, month = {March},year = {2019}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=9404}}


Cybathlon@SCHOOL ist ein Programm, das Behinderte, Armamputierte auch, als "Material" bezeichnet und anpreist.

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Disability and the public - prosthetic arms and more: do we appear "competent"? (review)

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Disability and the public - prosthetic arms and more: do we appear "competent"? (review); published December 7, 2018, 15:50; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=8812.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1571228948, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Disability and the public - prosthetic arms and more: do we appear "competent"? (review)}}, month = {December},year = {2018}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=8812}}


The current view of us, what the general public thinks of us, seems to be a major aspect. Of "us", yes.

The research question for this armchair analyst thus will be: are we - arm amputees in specific, and, as people with a visible physical handicap more generally, more broadly as disabled people generally, seen as competent people?

Generally, the answer seems to be a clear "NO" right from the outset.

This should not come as a shock. There are good reasons to believe that, great reasons to make that plausible, perfect reasons to justify that statement. With that, there may be exceptions to that -  people that see through society's fairytales of disability, horror and fears, but they are usually the exception.

As I had figured out quite early into my enquiries into that issue, that this aspect is of absolutely no further practical concern not because it is not disconcerting - but because I cannot change it. And that is a rapid, lean and cynical logical consequence, that I stopped caring about what other people think of me based on, say, visual impression of my prosthetic arm. I may thus safely focus on function and comfort, sustainability and cost, without worrying too much about whether other people treat me as more or less competent based on my looks. Not because it would not be cool to take influence but because it is of no matter as to the target dimension: the tendendy to disregard any mental capacity of people with physical handicap appears to be implemented in many people's thinking outside of any actual experiences. And regardless of what type of prosthesis I wear.

If anything, I might optimize my appearance by simply trying to look reasonably neat.

But to bend over backwards for what really we have to concede are actually strange people? If anything, can we hack their brains?

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DJ Hookie [interview]

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - DJ Hookie [interview]; published October 3, 2016, 00:42; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=6350.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1571228948, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - DJ Hookie [interview]}}, month = {October},year = {2016}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=6350}}


While we wait for the self-imposed media hype to accompany the current deep societal misunderstandings that allow for "Cybathlon" to happen - an unbearably useless and utter waste of money inasmuch as most of the presented prosthetic arms there are concerned, not just because these arms are expensive but technologically wrong for any real physical work, perpetuating history since the times of the Carnes arm - we can refresh our minds with the ideas and attitudes of down to earth and real, socially well integrated people. Like, me : )

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Disability as spectacle? [tracing everyday experiences to follow this proposed aspect]

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Disability as spectacle? [tracing everyday experiences to follow this proposed aspect]; published June 14, 2016, 19:37; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=6165.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1571228948, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Disability as spectacle? [tracing everyday experiences to follow this proposed aspect]}}, month = {June},year = {2016}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=6165}}


An upcoming conference seems to hit more precisely than any other contemporary "spectacle" - from body "hacking" (featuring people that quite simply wear stock item devices) over "workshops" where participants are filmed or photographed (but do not get systematic solutions to all aspects that are shown) to "bionic" limb featurettes - the subject at the very core of the current preoccupation of society with disability is not help or support but focus. Support may only be part of making things appear right.

Actual, true, and dedicated improvement or help is not rendered. It is at best shown as sugar coating, thrown in as minimal excuse, offered as pretense, but not made a didactic or technical focus. We now need to delineate real work, real support from sugar coated symbolism that has different goals and purposes.

What is *featured* here - in that conference - is the "spectacle" aspect. What is featured in some odd "bionic" arm workshop is exactly that: they call it "help" - but they invite television to show how good they are and the focus is not on actual function but on "how it looks and appears to the public". They call it "support", but its main feature is a live stream of discussions on media channels all the while the hook remains the best prosthetic ever.

disabilityasspectacle

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Missing hand, hook, and perceived risk [sociology of fables leaking into modern day perceptions]

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Missing hand, hook, and perceived risk [sociology of fables leaking into modern day perceptions]; published May 30, 2016, 22:40; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=4681.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1571228948, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Missing hand, hook, and perceived risk [sociology of fables leaking into modern day perceptions]}}, month = {May},year = {2016}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=4681}}


Fables and fairy tales carry narratives whose symbolism swaps over into apparently secular perceptions [1]. In other words, even societies that claim to be educated, enlightened and secular typically risk to follow myths - unless they take very specific care to not get trapped there.

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[1] S. White, "Severed Hands as Symbols of Humanity in Legend and Popular Narratives," , 2014.
[Bibtex]
@article{white2014severed,
  title={Severed Hands as Symbols of Humanity in Legend and Popular Narratives},
  author={White, Scott},
  year={2014}
}

Deadpool movie quote

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Deadpool movie quote; published April 29, 2016, 23:05; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=5878.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1571228948, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Deadpool movie quote}}, month = {April},year = {2016}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=5878}}


Within the riddles, toings and froings of faked disability and disfigurements in cinema, there are rare highlights.

Deadpool, best movie quote.

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Being human #voightkampff - nondisabled vs. disabled people [scenarios]

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Being human #voightkampff - nondisabled vs. disabled people [scenarios]; published March 2, 2016, 18:11; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=5743.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1571228948, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Being human #voightkampff - nondisabled vs. disabled people [scenarios]}}, month = {March},year = {2016}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=5743}}


The mutual viewing of who of us when regarding each other is more, or less, human has a potentially big impact on societal cohesion.

Prosthetic arms today - at least inasmuch as the "bionic" arms hype is concerned - are by far a more societal than practical aspect, so these aspects play a massive role. Once even technical researchers give up honest technical work in their attempt to reach for the fame and society grapes, they start to attach themselves to a dynamic that is neither obvious nor cool. I already strongly advised arm amputees to abandon that social dynamic actively as not doing that will result in actual problems (link). But it starts smooth and nicely before escalating into what one might actually call "the Voight-Kampff chambers of hell of symbolic attribution in attempting mutual acceptance as human".

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Visualizing a Broken Body - Cyborg art implications for visual and functional prosthetic design [art, cultural reflection]

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Visualizing a Broken Body - Cyborg art implications for visual and functional prosthetic design [art, cultural reflection]; published July 10, 2015, 19:30; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=4880.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1571228948, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Visualizing a Broken Body - Cyborg art implications for visual and functional prosthetic design [art, cultural reflection]}}, month = {July},year = {2015}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=4880}}


Introduction

It has been remarked by individuals that believe of themselves to be quite observant - such as - that a prosthetic hook is, culturally, referencing "Captain Hook", such as Geoffrey Ling, and although we cannot think greatly of people that spit on established, proven and functioning prosthetic devices, we can try to see where they come from. What they do is look at popular culture to shape their unreflected but acid critique.

chook

Their problem is only, that they do not keep looking at popular culture. They just go half way to name Captain Hook (if they go that far at all) in talking bad about hook devices, when really they do not consider popular culture all the way. If at all, they should do that with heart and with focus. How can I believe any researchers that talks down to me, as a hook user, by referring to terms such as "arcane" and "Captain Hook", when they are culturally unaware? Because when they are sloppy with their pop culture, what tells me they are not totally sloppy with their "technical" work? Alright, one glance at the edgy iLimb hand and torn up gloves and we know that answer. After all, if one is to look at pop culture, it is not just about extending research programs for preconceived ideas that end up without accessible devices on a small market, is it. It is not just about trying to sell "bionic" hands that may be just about as useful as a bugger in the nose (but cost more). It is about actually trying to understand what that popular culture can tell us were one to go that way, all the way.

And Captain Hook is the earliest pop culture "cyborg" in that he, in some way, integrates human body and technology under a new umbrella identity, that of "Captain Hook". As a famous tweet proposed: if he was given a prosthetic hand, he'd be "Captain Hand". Would have been quite a game changer, that.

Analysis of popular culture imagery and their significance for amputees

The way a damaged body is visualized both when in despair, when suffering damage or disintegration or loss, and when it is at ease, repaired, is present throughout our cultures.

So we can not only look at what the non-disabled public believes in when portraying damage or loss. We can also have a close look at visual elements of recovered, re-established people, and here, people that are "bound" to repair type technology.

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Blognews, Behinderung, Fairness [rant]

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Blognews, Behinderung, Fairness [rant]; published March 31, 2015, 05:58; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=4653.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1571228948, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Blognews, Behinderung, Fairness [rant]}}, month = {March},year = {2015}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=4653}}


Es gab im letzten Jahr einen wirklich kurligen Blogbeitrag zum Thema Fairness und Behinderung im Sport, und zwar den bei Frau Gehlhaar [link]:

Es ging um den Sportler Markus Rehm. Er ist Leichtathlet und unterschenkelamputiert. Mit einer angepassten Prothese nahm der Paralympic-Sieger jetzt zusammen mit nichtbehinderten Sportlern an den Nordreihn-Meisterschaften teil und konnte aktuell Gewinne für sich verbuchen. Sein sportlicher Erfolg brachte ihn ins Gespräch und in die Presse. Klingt erstmal ganz normal. Jemand gewinnt einen Wettkampf und bekommt dadurch die Aufmerksamkeit der Medien. Die Geschichte hat jedoch einen bitteren Beigeschmack. Es wurden Beschwerden laut, dass Rehm durch seine Prothese einen deutlichen Vorteil gehabt hätte und somit seinen Konkurrenten, im wahrsten Sinne des Wortes, einen Sprung voraus gewesen wäre. „Untersucht werden soll, ob die Prothese von Markus Rehm ein unerlaubtes Hilfsmittel ist, mit dem ein Vorteil bei Wettbewerben mit Nichtbehinderten erzielt werden kann“, erklärte DLV-Präsident Clemens Prokop der Nachrichtenagentur dpa. Der unterschenkelamputierte Leichtathlet Oscar Pistorius hatte sich vor zwei Jahren seine Teilnahme an den Olympischen Spielen und Weltmeisterschaften rechtlich erstritten. Der Fokus auf dem damaligen Rechtsstreit lag auf Pistorius‘ Beinprothesen und inwieweit sie ihm Vorteile, aber auch Nachteile beim Start, Absprung, etc. beschaffen könnten.

pisti

Als erster Sportler mit Behinderung durfte Pistorius schließlich an den Olympischen Sommerspielen 2012 in London teilnehmen und fand sich am Ende auf dem achten Platz wieder. Aber was wäre gewesen, hätte Pistorius, wie sein Sportkollege Rehm, ganz oben auf dem Treppchen gestanden? Wären seine Prothesen dann auch als eine Art Wettbewerbsvorteil negativ aufgefallen? Markus Rehm hat im Vergleich zu seinen nichtbehinderten Konkurrenten gute sportliche Leistungen erzielt und somit die defizitorientierte Sicht auf Behinderung widerlegt. In der Diskussion ändert sich aber der Blick auf die Prothese, die auf einmal nicht mehr die Behinderung definiert, sondern angeblich einen “Wettbewerbsvorteil” bringt. Es ist schon fast amüsant, wenn es nicht so traurig wäre, wie Rehm nur über die Prothese definiert wird.

Gut.

Markus Rehm wurde in Ulm am 26.7.2014 mit 8,24m Deutscher Meister, in einem nicht-behinderten Wettkampf, in dem er nur und ausschliesslich wegen der Prothese gewann, einem Federbein, auf dem er absprang, also, auch sein Sprungbein. Mehr an "definiert" geht gar nicht, was Weitspringen angeht. Anschliessend wurde er für die Europameisterschaft der Nichtbehinderten gesperrt:  "Messungen der Biomechaniker hatten ergeben, dass Rehm beim Anlauf kurz vor dem Absprung deutlich langsamer war als andere Männer bei vergleichbaren 8-Meter-Sprüngen und er trotzdem beim Absprung eine höhere Vertikalgeschwindigkeit erreichte als Christian Reif" (link ). Der allermerkwürdigste Satz schliesst somit direkt an Frau Gehlhaars eben zitierten Text an, er lautet so:

Ich möchte an dieser Stelle nicht diskutieren, ob und welche Vor- oder Nachteile solche Prothesen bringen können.

Nicht?

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A myoelectric prosthetic arm does have a mind on its own [just watch this - problems with postural interference, limb position(ing) effect, possible solution].

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - A myoelectric prosthetic arm does have a mind on its own [just watch this - problems with postural interference, limb position(ing) effect, possible solution].; published December 8, 2014, 18:40; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=3784.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1571228948, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - A myoelectric prosthetic arm does have a mind on its own [just watch this - problems with postural interference, limb position(ing) effect, possible solution].}}, month = {December},year = {2014}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=3784}}


armcrazy

Easily, a myoelectric arm gets out of control.

But I liked the next one even better. And mine also has such tendencies. They are inherent to the technology. These things really have a mind on their own.

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Uncanny valley and its vicious impact on researchers, media and amputees [projected vision spaces]

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Uncanny valley and its vicious impact on researchers, media and amputees [projected vision spaces]; published November 11, 2014, 18:42; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=3677.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1571228948, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Uncanny valley and its vicious impact on researchers, media and amputees [projected vision spaces]}}, month = {November},year = {2014}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=3677}}


Appearances and social effects are closely interlinked. As one example, clothes have always had a major impact on social interactions. Read a good book if this is new to you. Along the same lines, even appearances of cars, computers, gadgets et cetera are often heavily discussed. Manufacturers spend a lot of money for looks of consumer goods. If you want to buy a bicycle today, one selling point is the color being particularly robust - even though the frame cannot rust and the color is of really no practical use. So, appearances and social effects are a real thing these days. They create major ripples.

With that, re-enter the uncanny valley.

Appearances are the end-all-be-all for many aspects of prosthetic hands and arms. At first, every now and then, or whenever, you just do not want to stand out as arm amputee, and, with that, you want to look and be enabled. Appearance - looking inconspicuous, looking enabled - every now and so often are a prosthetic arm's sole raison d'etre. Also, and painfully so, that is where prosthetic hands and arms all die that sudden instantaneous all encompassing total death of utter failure. There is just no way to get this really right. Of course, no one ever made an uncompromising attempt at building a realistically appearing prosthetic hand, but then, that problem is intractable. Read a good blog entry about prosthetic arm appearance testing, if that is new to you.

As appearance requirements for prosthetic hands, wrist and arms are massive in their impact overall, it pays well to now dedicate some more attention to this aspect rather than considering the big picture [link].

Because if you cannot get the looks of your prosthetic arm right, you start out as the outcast no matter what. You may not end up there but that is a bit of the problem - negotiating back "apparent" competence. And so from that moment on, the deck of cards is dealt in a totally different way. Look at it like that: if I am already put into the awkward position to explain the ill disposition of my handicapped arm, total wreckage enabled hooks are a far better and plausible display of "enabled" than a high pitched stir of slowly animated fragile 70s B-movie appealing pansy boy hand. That is, if I am already put into that awkward position to explain that.

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Über das Design und Aussehen der Armprothese

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Über das Design und Aussehen der Armprothese; published October 6, 2014, 19:32; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=3497.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1571228948, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Über das Design und Aussehen der Armprothese}}, month = {October},year = {2014}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=3497}}


Beim Aussehen geht es um Starren, Ansehen, es geht in zweiter Linie um territoriale Ansprüche, und dann um intuitive Kompetenzeinschätzung.

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