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Category: Hosmer

Soldering cable connection and heat shrinking tube over connection (Extreme Cyborging Microworks)

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Soldering cable connection and heat shrinking tube over connection (Extreme Cyborging Microworks); published April 4, 2019, 06:59; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=9463.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1571214811, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Soldering cable connection and heat shrinking tube over connection (Extreme Cyborging Microworks)}}, month = {April},year = {2019}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=9463}}


A full understanding what amputees do or do not in their real life has so far escaped the acumen of research and development. This explains how > 85% of us still run free, without the real restriction of having to pay massive money for technology that basically makes life more difficult.

A notable exception is my body powered split hook. As we can show how academics comprehensively fail to grasp (haha) the scope and use of prosthetic arm use, even a modest achievement such as this appears quite noteworthy and definitely reportable. After all, absolutely no (0) achievement was delivered by any R&D in the domain of myoelectric arms to this day that has made it to actual everyday use and hard work delivery, both since Cybathlon 2016 (that promised it would "push" development) and generally since >40 years of "research" into myoelectric arm control. As they all have more than a lot to learn (not advancing problematically high error rates in >40 years is a catastrophe or wouldn't you say), we are called upon to focus on the basic.

Today, how to attach the cable of a power supply to a pump.

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Case-study of a user-driven prosthetic arm design: bionic hand versus customized body-powered technology in a highly demanding work environment [article out]

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Case-study of a user-driven prosthetic arm design: bionic hand versus customized body-powered technology in a highly demanding work environment [article out]; published January 4, 2018, 14:29; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=8066.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1571214811, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Case-study of a user-driven prosthetic arm design: bionic hand versus customized body-powered technology in a highly demanding work environment [article out]}}, month = {January},year = {2018}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=8066}}


 


This is a blog post of one of the rare focused and well based scientific journal articles that really explains how real work, body powered and myoelectric arms relate and go together for a unilateral right below elbow amputee in a physically demanding work environment.

The prior presentation of this paper [poster at Cybathlon symposium 2016], which had been more pragmatically worded (with me thinking people would know anyway), this was now written up as article and published. During that process, the reviewers clearly made great points of all kinds of aspects I never knew were not sky clear to everyone.

So maybe, writing a ~ 30 page case study with > 210 references does clarify stuff, at least potentially and for those that actually read it. But possibly, it still requires attention to even just read it.

Knowledge does not come easy, Highlander! (Nakano, in: Highlander III The Final Dimension)

 

If you are more interested in visionary posts, read about the gadget features of the prosthetic arm in Kingsmen: The Golden Circle [link]. And technically, myoelectric control did have it coming. That technology remained uncool for four decades [link].

Publication [link]

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Grip strengths (measured results)

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Grip strengths (measured results); published January 18, 2017, 20:09; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=7085.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1571214811, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Grip strengths (measured results)}}, month = {January},year = {2017}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=7085}}


Using a Camry EH101 electronic hand dynamometer, I went through a few prosthetic terminal devices for my arm to see just how strong they were. And I added a baseline for my (human) left hand and my (bare) stump.

This certainly provides a base for a range of discussions later. Or previous ones ; )

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Towards Extreme Cyborging (EC) microworks: very small things [grip mechanics theory, parametrization and then testing side by side - Trautman hook, Hosmer Mod 5 hook, TRS Prehensor, Touch Bionics iLimb revolution]

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Towards Extreme Cyborging (EC) microworks: very small things [grip mechanics theory, parametrization and then testing side by side - Trautman hook, Hosmer Mod 5 hook, TRS Prehensor, Touch Bionics iLimb revolution]; published December 28, 2016, 17:52; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=7010.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1571214811, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Towards Extreme Cyborging (EC) microworks: very small things [grip mechanics theory, parametrization and then testing side by side - Trautman hook, Hosmer Mod 5 hook, TRS Prehensor, Touch Bionics iLimb revolution]}}, month = {December},year = {2016}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=7010}}


Small things to be picked up, side by side demo with other prosthetic devices.

Yes, very small things.

"It is the little things that count", they said. "The little things are important", they said. They all said that. But behold, their "bionic" apparatus cannot handle little things! "Why is a hook not evil", they wondered. And a storm of little demo videos came upon them. Deep into the myriad of grip mechanics this went.

"Get a grip on grips", he said.

This totally bypasses the fact that after laying down real life consequences for what I call Extreme Cyborging, I just finished building my first own steel Trautman hook, and all just with shape information from the internet. Yeah, you read that right. I did not build yet another one of the ubiquitous funny hands that promises to change my life or what it is these 3D printed hands now do - no. I sit on the demand and I sit on the technology and what is it that I do? See? This is what should really disturb you - because given the current signs of the times, it should feel deeply wrong on many levels. To you. But then, we were likely living on different planets all along, and maybe it is time you realize that too ; ) After we knew since years in detail what the Cybathlon showed us yet again, with glory but not with any improvement, it is yet again up to us, the users, to push further into what is, what can be, and what matters. And honestly? We have seen far enough funny hand videos.

What we have not seen is the Rebirth of The Cool. The Rebirth of an absolutely insane gripper. Physically. In 3D printed steel. The Trautman hook is such a device. And I went for it just because I can.
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Casio wrist watch wrist band swap [technical, EC microworks]

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Casio wrist watch wrist band swap [technical, EC microworks]; published November 24, 2016, 19:44; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=6851.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1571214811, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Casio wrist watch wrist band swap [technical, EC microworks]}}, month = {November},year = {2016}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=6851}}


I switched the old used up Casio watch wristband against a new one. I used a prosthetic hook to do it.

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#userdrivendesign Prosthetic arm design: i-Limb Revolution versus customized body powered arm in a work environment combining bodily exertion, wide temperature ranges, wide body motion ranges, heavy workload and subtle grips [Cybathlon Symposium, Oct 6 2016, Poster A12]

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - #userdrivendesign Prosthetic arm design: i-Limb Revolution versus customized body powered arm in a work environment combining bodily exertion, wide temperature ranges, wide body motion ranges, heavy workload and subtle grips [Cybathlon Symposium, Oct 6 2016, Poster A12]; published October 2, 2016, 13:05; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=6342.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1571214811, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - #userdrivendesign Prosthetic arm design: i-Limb Revolution versus customized body powered arm in a work environment combining bodily exertion, wide temperature ranges, wide body motion ranges, heavy workload and subtle grips [Cybathlon Symposium, Oct 6 2016, Poster A12]}}, month = {October},year = {2016}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=6342}}


PDF of poster presentation @ Cybathlon Symposium Oct 06 2016 @ Kloten.

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Stabilizing rod-like item with a prosthetic hook [two ways]

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Stabilizing rod-like item with a prosthetic hook [two ways]; published June 23, 2016, 16:36; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=6205.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1571214811, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Stabilizing rod-like item with a prosthetic hook [two ways]}}, month = {June},year = {2016}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=6205}}


There are basically two ways to stabilize a rod-like item (fork, knife, rod, etc) with a prosthetic hook.

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Prosthetic options and Yenga - intricate grip differentiation details [up close grip mechanics]

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Prosthetic options and Yenga - intricate grip differentiation details [up close grip mechanics]; published June 14, 2016, 19:30; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=6144.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1571214811, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Prosthetic options and Yenga - intricate grip differentiation details [up close grip mechanics]}}, month = {June},year = {2016}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=6144}}


Playing Yenga at a prosthetic arm workshop was interesting.

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Hosmer Model 6 Work Hook [tweak / improvement / backlock feature]

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Hosmer Model 6 Work Hook [tweak / improvement / backlock feature]; published June 2, 2016, 11:47; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=6102.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1571214811, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Hosmer Model 6 Work Hook [tweak / improvement / backlock feature]}}, month = {June},year = {2016}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=6102}}


The Hosmer Model 6 Work Hook is by far the most robust, powerful and useful commercially available terminal device for real work, besides the Toughware PRX V2P Prehensor and the Toughware PRX Retro. This Hosmer device is particularly useful due to the backlock feature that allows the user to reliably hold also relatively heavy machines for an extended period of time (such as hedge cutters).

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How to cut 3D origami using a prosthetic arm [1:1]

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - How to cut 3D origami using a prosthetic arm [1:1]; published October 24, 2015, 21:40; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=5553.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1571214811, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - How to cut 3D origami using a prosthetic arm [1:1]}}, month = {October},year = {2015}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=5553}}


So the cold time of the year approaches here.

Obviously there is this book called "Horrorgami". Obviously I had to get it.

Paper Dandy's Horrorgami: 20 Gruesome Scenes to Cut and Fold

And of all patterns contained in it, I had to start making the "Werewolf" pattern.

alaindelonsmokes

Go figure.

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Trimming hedges with Hosmer 6 work hook and 2,7 kg cutter in 37 deg C sunny summer [achievement / benchmark report]

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Trimming hedges with Hosmer 6 work hook and 2,7 kg cutter in 37 deg C sunny summer [achievement / benchmark report]; published July 4, 2015, 23:33; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=5013.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1571214811, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Trimming hedges with Hosmer 6 work hook and 2,7 kg cutter in 37 deg C sunny summer [achievement / benchmark report]}}, month = {July},year = {2015}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=5013}}


Bimanual activities that require a prosthetic arm (one with industrial qualities) often times evade the prosthetist, the societal arm chair citizen, the academic researchers, the media makers that "use" amputees as stereotypes, in many aspects - one risks to overlook the simple glory, the sunshine that goes with doing it, the hardness of it, the pride. And the fact that it requires putting one's mind to something that is not just as self understood as it may appear.

What seems to be never considered is the fact that I really need a prosthetic arm for actual bimanual activities. It is for these situations where there is a need to work two-handedly, where a prosthetic arm attains a deeper relevance and importance. And it is not just me, that as a need there, actually. That is the type of stuff one generally needs a prosthetic arm for. Those activities are the ones where insurances usually tend to agree to pay for a prosthetic arm - a prosthetic arm that works through these tasks, mind you: hard work, repetitive work, two hands required, very hot, very cold, dangerous. Leaving the amputee totally intact, by the way.

Operating a hedge cutter is just not possible, safe, or easy with just one hand. In other words, we talk about real work. And no, you cannot "just put your mind to it". Sure with a small tiny clipper you can approximate the sound and feel - but with 2-3 kg and overhead work with a long powerful cutter, one-handed is a big risk, and operating the switch together with directing the blade is very hard.

That, as opposed to drinking coffee, reading news paper, just going for lunch with a food tray, cutting pizza or meat, shopping with bags or baskets, tying shoe laces, talk past a Bialetti when making remarks about "making coffee", opening a fridge, wearing correctly sized trousers, walking a dog, drinking alcohol, or such  - all of these work with a Becker hand, with a passive arm, with a hook or without prosthesis quite well, too.

Not, like, hedge cutting. This requires, like, a real prosthetic arm. It cannot be done without prosthetic arm, with a passive arm, with the "bionic" stuff (their control paradigm is just not safe for that type of work), certainly not with "3d printed" gadgetry that risks to scratch up your stump in no time. I talk about reliability, comfort, overuse, asymmetry, grip function, the stuff that hopefully, my real sustainable living future is made of.

To show what is required, or done, with a prosthetic arm in 2015, I cut the outer and inner perimeter of my hedges in the early afternoon of what turned out to be the hottest day in July in Switzerland since a long time, at over 37 deg C, using a Bosch AHS 55-16 (2,7kg) 450W electric cutter and a super tweaked body powered prosthetic arm with a Hosmer model 6 (back lock containing) work hook. The work contains overhead as well as low down feet height cutting.

 

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