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Category: EC microworks

Subaru dashboard modifications [how it is that we ("we") are?]

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Subaru dashboard modifications [how it is that we ("we") are?]; published October 3, 2019, 17:23; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=10198.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1571793914, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Subaru dashboard modifications [how it is that we ("we") are?]}}, month = {October},year = {2019}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=10198}}


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Sometimes, being an arm amputee is just not what other people think it is.  Fucking isn't, really, anyway, but this is such a shining example. A long time ago, I started having a large roll of red sheet rubber at home, an industry size thing. And double sided sticky tape. And stuff like that. Like, an arm amputee whould need that type of stuff. How come "we" - "the" arm amputees - have materials such as that at home? If they do excavations in, say, 50 years, they may find thes things and go "WTF did that guy do with that".

And it remains a valid question for scholars that study us ("us"): you may read all the works of any official apointee about what one has to consider in terms of prostheses - but you will never find any word about sheet rubber and sticky tape as stuff to keep, alongside WD40.

To the best of my knowledge, therefore, you read that here first, too.

So here we go: Subaru dashboard modifications for the benefit of an arm amputee.

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Subaru Weathertech floormat mount [what it is that we ("we") do]

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Subaru Weathertech floormat mount [what it is that we ("we") do]; published October 3, 2019, 16:44; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=10207.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1571793914, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Subaru Weathertech floormat mount [what it is that we ("we") do]}}, month = {October},year = {2019}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=10207}}


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This is a bit of Extreme Cyborging microworks: how to make a car floor mat stay in place with sturdy, cheap materials?

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Wie baue ich ein Fahrrad / Velo um für das Fahren mit einseitiger Armamputation? [Erfahrungsberichte / Vorschläge / Anleitung]

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Wie baue ich ein Fahrrad / Velo um für das Fahren mit einseitiger Armamputation? [Erfahrungsberichte / Vorschläge / Anleitung]; published August 29, 2019, 16:36; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=10034.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1571793914, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Wie baue ich ein Fahrrad / Velo um für das Fahren mit einseitiger Armamputation? [Erfahrungsberichte / Vorschläge / Anleitung]}}, month = {August},year = {2019}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=10034}}


Für das Fahrradfahren mit Armamputation (bei mir: Unterarmamputation rechts) habe ich inzwischen einige praktische Erfahrungen gesammelt. Diese sind hier zusammengestellt.

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Fixing espresso machine: swap pump of Rancilio Silvia [Extreme Cyborging]

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Fixing espresso machine: swap pump of Rancilio Silvia [Extreme Cyborging]; published August 24, 2019, 08:57; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=10055.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1571793914, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Fixing espresso machine: swap pump of Rancilio Silvia [Extreme Cyborging]}}, month = {August},year = {2019}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=10055}}


While our contemporary circus directors keep fighting with true elephants (Catch-22s: should one hammer with an iLimb? [link] - should one exhibit defect iLimb gloves under use in public? [link]), I used true and established technology [TRS Jaws - link] and fixed my coffee machine by replacing its pump.

While a new coffee machine (the same model but new) would cost me around 800 USD and while a repair by a company or specialist would cost me maybe around 400 USD, the replacement pump that I got via eBay from Bulgaria was 34,90 USD, with shipping 13 USD. Furthermore, the new pump was better - a more solid build, quieter. In addition, I did not have to suffer absence of the machine for more than about half an hour.

So while I do understand why people prefer to chose their prosthetic hand devices for their suitability for posing with them [link], I would propose to anyone that there might be a possibly more meaningful life beyond that.

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Soldering cable connection and heat shrinking tube over connection (Extreme Cyborging Microworks)

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Soldering cable connection and heat shrinking tube over connection (Extreme Cyborging Microworks); published April 4, 2019, 06:59; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=9463.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1571793914, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Soldering cable connection and heat shrinking tube over connection (Extreme Cyborging Microworks)}}, month = {April},year = {2019}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=9463}}


A full understanding what amputees do or do not in their real life has so far escaped the acumen of research and development. This explains how > 85% of us still run free, without the real restriction of having to pay massive money for technology that basically makes life more difficult.

A notable exception is my body powered split hook. As we can show how academics comprehensively fail to grasp (haha) the scope and use of prosthetic arm use, even a modest achievement such as this appears quite noteworthy and definitely reportable. After all, absolutely no (0) achievement was delivered by any R&D in the domain of myoelectric arms to this day that has made it to actual everyday use and hard work delivery, both since Cybathlon 2016 (that promised it would "push" development) and generally since >40 years of "research" into myoelectric arm control. As they all have more than a lot to learn (not advancing problematically high error rates in >40 years is a catastrophe or wouldn't you say), we are called upon to focus on the basic.

Today, how to attach the cable of a power supply to a pump.

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3D-print molded Protosil RTV 245 (durometer shore 40A) silicone covers for Toughware Equilux [proof of concept, demo of "bionic" grip]

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - 3D-print molded Protosil RTV 245 (durometer shore 40A) silicone covers for Toughware Equilux [proof of concept, demo of "bionic" grip]; published February 4, 2018, 11:50; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=8248.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1571793914, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - 3D-print molded Protosil RTV 245 (durometer shore 40A) silicone covers for Toughware Equilux [proof of concept, demo of "bionic" grip]}}, month = {February},year = {2018}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=8248}}


It is sometimes more fun to present the technical results before or even instead of explaining exactly why.  So in short, I 3d-designed and then printed molds to make grip covers for really serious grip performance of a Toughware Equilux device.

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Case-study of a user-driven prosthetic arm design: bionic hand versus customized body-powered technology in a highly demanding work environment [article out]

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Case-study of a user-driven prosthetic arm design: bionic hand versus customized body-powered technology in a highly demanding work environment [article out]; published January 4, 2018, 14:29; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=8066.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1571793914, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Case-study of a user-driven prosthetic arm design: bionic hand versus customized body-powered technology in a highly demanding work environment [article out]}}, month = {January},year = {2018}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=8066}}


 


This is a blog post of one of the rare focused and well based scientific journal articles that really explains how real work, body powered and myoelectric arms relate and go together for a unilateral right below elbow amputee in a physically demanding work environment.

The prior presentation of this paper [poster at Cybathlon symposium 2016], which had been more pragmatically worded (with me thinking people would know anyway), this was now written up as article and published. During that process, the reviewers clearly made great points of all kinds of aspects I never knew were not sky clear to everyone.

So maybe, writing a ~ 30 page case study with > 210 references does clarify stuff, at least potentially and for those that actually read it. But possibly, it still requires attention to even just read it.

Knowledge does not come easy, Highlander! (Nakano, in: Highlander III The Final Dimension)

 

If you are more interested in visionary posts, read about the gadget features of the prosthetic arm in Kingsmen: The Golden Circle [link]. And technically, myoelectric control did have it coming. That technology remained uncool for four decades [link].

Publication [link]

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Towards Extreme Cyborging (EC) microworks: very small things [grip mechanics theory, parametrization and then testing side by side - Trautman hook, Hosmer Mod 5 hook, TRS Prehensor, Touch Bionics iLimb revolution]

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Towards Extreme Cyborging (EC) microworks: very small things [grip mechanics theory, parametrization and then testing side by side - Trautman hook, Hosmer Mod 5 hook, TRS Prehensor, Touch Bionics iLimb revolution]; published December 28, 2016, 17:52; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=7010.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1571793914, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Towards Extreme Cyborging (EC) microworks: very small things [grip mechanics theory, parametrization and then testing side by side - Trautman hook, Hosmer Mod 5 hook, TRS Prehensor, Touch Bionics iLimb revolution]}}, month = {December},year = {2016}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=7010}}


Small things to be picked up, side by side demo with other prosthetic devices.

Yes, very small things.

"It is the little things that count", they said. "The little things are important", they said. They all said that. But behold, their "bionic" apparatus cannot handle little things! "Why is a hook not evil", they wondered. And a storm of little demo videos came upon them. Deep into the myriad of grip mechanics this went.

"Get a grip on grips", he said.

This totally bypasses the fact that after laying down real life consequences for what I call Extreme Cyborging, I just finished building my first own steel Trautman hook, and all just with shape information from the internet. Yeah, you read that right. I did not build yet another one of the ubiquitous funny hands that promises to change my life or what it is these 3D printed hands now do - no. I sit on the demand and I sit on the technology and what is it that I do? See? This is what should really disturb you - because given the current signs of the times, it should feel deeply wrong on many levels. To you. But then, we were likely living on different planets all along, and maybe it is time you realize that too ; ) After we knew since years in detail what the Cybathlon showed us yet again, with glory but not with any improvement, it is yet again up to us, the users, to push further into what is, what can be, and what matters. And honestly? We have seen far enough funny hand videos.

What we have not seen is the Rebirth of The Cool. The Rebirth of an absolutely insane gripper. Physically. In 3D printed steel. The Trautman hook is such a device. And I went for it just because I can.
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Fixing infinity on Russian Wide Lens Industar 69 M39 [EC microworks]

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Fixing infinity on Russian Wide Lens Industar 69 M39 [EC microworks]; published December 2, 2016, 10:20; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=6936.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1571793914, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Fixing infinity on Russian Wide Lens Industar 69 M39 [EC microworks]}}, month = {December},year = {2016}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=6936}}


How to fix infinity on Russian Wide Lens Industar 69 M, per se, is not a secret.

But getting a right below elbow amputee do it is not an everyday experience. Being that person oneself, one cannot but go at it.

People will tell you left and right that you need their "new bionic hand" to do all kinds of things and they parade their "bionic" hands "holding a newspaper" because "it is the little things that count".

Who knows : )

Quite possibly, after a decade or so, looking back, you still are filled with awe just how well you held that newspaper back in the days. Or, how you posed with that hand back in the days, while asking someone else to change that bike tire for you. I do not want to exclude that possibility as remote as it seems.

But from where I am standing, it's still the big things that count. And the thing is that very small things are not what is meant with "the little things". Very small things can be so difficult to handle that it is a big achievement, despite the size proverb pun.

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3D printing requires a prosthetic hook [easing into tech]

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - 3D printing requires a prosthetic hook [easing into tech]; published November 25, 2016, 19:49; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=6874.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1571793914, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - 3D printing requires a prosthetic hook [easing into tech]}}, month = {November},year = {2016}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=6874}}


The notable civilatory achievement of being able to "print 3D hands" is a media hype thing. No one that I know personally wears one.

But it is interesting to use this technology. 3D printing, that is.

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Casio wrist watch wrist band swap [technical, EC microworks]

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Casio wrist watch wrist band swap [technical, EC microworks]; published November 24, 2016, 19:44; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=6851.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1571793914, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Casio wrist watch wrist band swap [technical, EC microworks]}}, month = {November},year = {2016}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=6851}}


I switched the old used up Casio watch wristband against a new one. I used a prosthetic hook to do it.

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Bimanual tasks - stitching bag tag holder back into place [Northface bag; task evaluation; benchmark]

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Bimanual tasks - stitching bag tag holder back into place [Northface bag; task evaluation; benchmark]; published April 26, 2014, 22:39; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=2953.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1571793914, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Bimanual tasks - stitching bag tag holder back into place [Northface bag; task evaluation; benchmark]}}, month = {April},year = {2014}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=2953}}


 

To separate Real Men from Quiche Eaters, a range of observations can be useful howevermuch one needs to know them before being able to apply them.  In the context of prosthetic arms, quite obviously, the ability to discriminate shit from shinola does not grow on trees either.

If you are now even the mildest bit offended by me using clear language, bear in mind that no self respecting quiche eating "bionic" aficionado ever avoids to equate prosthetic hooks with "arcane" technology or fairytale figures such as Captain Hook. And as long as we all accept that the first stone has been cast, and that (if you are part of that group) you might be part of a problem (rather than a solution), we are all super cool, particularly when now we are going to call the cards.

Real tests do grow on trees, actually, in the real world. Already so far, it should have become sky clear to you that wearing a prosthetic arm to do lesser acts than storing a sofa on the attic is mostly (but not quite) pansy boy (not girly!) territory. If your prosthetic arm does not fully assist in solving these bimanual tasks, revise its concept before it is too late. Because if anything, real life does not change because of you suggesting amputees wear 3 kg material that cannot even open a bag of pop corn. I write this because I know that that was what you were (secretly) hoping.

So here is the task.

The tag holder of my Northface bag came off due to travel and strain.

The damage can be seen in the following picture. The other side of the tag holder had come undone more extensively.

WP_20140421_13_13_52_Pro (2)

Here is me stitching it back on.

For that, I use a thick strong needle and thick strong black string.

In order to push the needle through the dense fabric of the bag, lots of force must be applied to the needle, and to make sure the (gray, see following image) plastic of the tag holder stays in place, the prosthetic hook is used to exert precise ultra hard counter pressure. This works extremely well. I tried sewing with the Becker hand - that works. But sewing with the i-Limb was a disaster. The fingers are too weak, cannot reliably grip, definitely do not push hard enough and the controls are not useful when using the elbow and forearm muscles of the stump to actually push hard with the prosthetic device.

WP_20140421_13_13_15_Pro

 

Here is a view on the needle penetrating bag and tag holder:

WP_20140421_13_11_34_Pro

In order to allow for needle maneuvering from outside to the inside, the inside lid bag inset - the gray net that you see - must be kept away from the needle. So, doing that with the hook is extremely fast and effective as the hook's grip and precision as well as its immediate speed make for a fast progress.

WP_20140421_13_10_36_Pro

Do not get me wrong here. It is nice and sweet to see fluffy ideas of what a prosthetic hand should do in the imagination of some academics. But it is immensely nicer and sweeter to actually have and be able to use a prosthetic that allows me, here and there and now, to really solve hard bi-manual tasks no researcher, in all years of prosthetic hand research, has EVER thought of, but that I anticipated when we were putting together my prosthetic arm. Not even 15 minutes later after I had started was my bag stitched up and fixed and ready to fly.

Remember. Real men stitch stuff up and get it ready in no time.

[Bimanual task benchmark activities]

Sewing - thread manipulation

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Sewing - thread manipulation; published December 27, 2009, 04:31; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=252.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1571793914, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Sewing - thread manipulation}}, month = {December},year = {2009}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=252}}


Grabbing thread. Comparing Otto Bock MovoHook 2Grip (cost: around 1200 USD) and Becker Lock Grip hand (cost: around 600 USD). Maybe the very functional design of hooks implies high functionality - but whether there really is functionality should be tested carefully.

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