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Category: #voightkampff test – dilemma

Zweimaltot - Beat Glogger (Buchbesprechung) [i]

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Zweimaltot - Beat Glogger (Buchbesprechung) [i]; published April 9, 2019, 13:15; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=9570.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1574123252, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Zweimaltot - Beat Glogger (Buchbesprechung) [i]}}, month = {April},year = {2019}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=9570}}


Ich habe mir nun termingerecht das Buch "Zweimaltot" von Beat Glogger vorgenommen. Meine Buchbesprechung, Review oder Rezension hier verrät allerdings Einzelheiten über den Ausgang (Spoiler Alert).


(C) Copyright Reinhardt Verlag

Das Buch gibt es hier:

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Zweimaltot - Beat Glogger (Buchbesprechung)

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Zweimaltot - Beat Glogger (Buchbesprechung); published April 9, 2019, 13:14; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=9492.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1574123252, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Zweimaltot - Beat Glogger (Buchbesprechung)}}, month = {April},year = {2019}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=9492}}


Ich habe mir nun termingerecht das Buch "Zweimaltot" von Beat Glogger vorgenommen. Meine Buchbesprechung, Review oder Rezension hier verrät allerdings Einzelheiten über den Ausgang (Spoiler Alert).


(C) Copyright Reinhardt Verlag

Das Buch gibt es hier:

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Was ist mit Cybathlon@SCHOOL moeglicherweise problematisch?

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Was ist mit Cybathlon@SCHOOL moeglicherweise problematisch?; published March 2, 2019, 11:39; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=9404.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1574123252, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Was ist mit Cybathlon@SCHOOL moeglicherweise problematisch?}}, month = {March},year = {2019}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=9404}}


Cybathlon@SCHOOL ist ein Programm, das Behinderte, Armamputierte auch, als "Material" bezeichnet und anpreist.

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User perspective on the rubber hand illusion in a wider sense – prosthetic arm and ownership for real use [reflection and consideration]

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - User perspective on the rubber hand illusion in a wider sense – prosthetic arm and ownership for real use [reflection and consideration]; published January 2, 2019, 22:16; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=8882.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1574123252, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - User perspective on the rubber hand illusion in a wider sense – prosthetic arm and ownership for real use [reflection and consideration]}}, month = {January},year = {2019}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=8882}}


The year 2018 was interesting in relation to the rubber hand illusion subject.

I had participated in an extensive interview study regarding embodiment just a year before [link]. Then, I had been identified as a prosthesis "super user" [link] - these people wanted to investigate my type of "embodiment" through fMRI, but we quickly identified my prosthetic arm design (not my brain) as the key aspect regarding the question of why I have a prosthesis that I can actually use rather than just pose with as so many others. My own view here clearly is that if you are after embodiment, you have to go all Sherlock Holmes, you have to go all forensic, all CSI and all crime mystery: and as in "cherchez la femme" when looking for a motive in a crime, it is "cherchez le bras" when studying embodiment: for all issues that center around prosthetic use, go for the core physical aspects first. There are extremely bad things that may, can, and will happen if you do not make that your real first priority. The "rubber hand illusion" is an extreme variation of body ownership of a rubber hand that does not even touch a person and still that person thinks they are being touched if that rubber hand is touched. The illusion to make an amputee believe they embody or bodily own a prosthetic hand is quite different. But both pose risks, whereas the risk that an amputee faces when getting a prosthetic arm that is integrated into his body image has not been considered yet. My slightly experience based consideration proposes that the body image is tyrannically governed, for good and for bad, and if the prosthetic body part - already starting with bad cards, body image wise - craps out, and it always does so far too often, then it draws the hot red angry ire, the depressed disappointment, the falling apart of the cyborg body, of the amputee - and definitely not the cool "oh a neutral object just disintegrated" that one will wish for from a societal, insurance or repair view. The integration into a body image brings with it that the device becomes subject to totally tyranically governed bodies. When it is difficult enough to make any device ready for real world usage, making it ready to survive tyrannies of that nature will be even harder. I proposed an unforgiving approach to failure testing in a recent paper (link) but I cannot say that paper has been greeted with any enthusiasm by the industry that actually builds prosthetic arm components. Because they get to directly face the anger, hate, and rejection of all the users that they had not informed well of just how fragile their prosthetic arm parts really are (link), and they are in absolutely no position to technically improve these parts. So, manufacturers go into hiding. They do not want many users - they want users that buy and do not complain. The last thing they need is a hard bright unforgiving look into just how bad their engineering is. Every non-user, every rejector, should be cautiously left alone, not recruited to wear a prosthesis - because the risk is considerable (link). Researchers currently have the problem that amputees run away, everywhere (link), also because we are continously treated as mentally incompetent. So in essence, we are a group of people that increasingly realizes the extent to which we are being fooled, being had, told stories, and increasingly, we are getting critical. Potential rubber hand illusion switches, dragged to market to be soldered into prosthetic arms, if ever they are a medical treatment or a part thereof, will have negative effects as well: what are these? What do we know about deeply problematic aspects of bodily ownership? I had been invited to talk about that aspect for a group of people interested in robotic control and user interfaces, on December 7th 2018, in Mannheim (Germany). The presentation that I gave now is typed out here in more detail for further reference.

Rubber hand illusion is an idea that, by and large, was somehow transformed into multi-sensory rubber hand illusion, and they now want to put it into prosthetic arms to make users believe the prosthesis belongs to their bodies.

With that, rubber hand illusion goes to market1)As in: piggy goes to market..

This is not really that fascinating. While I am not interested in prosthetic arms because I find the field fascinating, I have been drawn into the field due to circumstances. And as much as you feel that I am locked into this constraint space of shared idiocies, dreams, hopes and failing hardware together with you, in some type of brotherhood by bad fate, you may also realize you are locked into this with me, as consequence of bad fate. Those then are also circumstances. As I deal with it, you may also have to find a way. If you think that is uncomfortable, send me a mail, so we may talk about uncomfortable a bit.

The ultimate consquence of this piece of reflection is not at all bad, however. We will see just how too much "ownership" has bad aspects as well. It risks to slip prosthetic hands into a domain where it is subject to the most vicious decision making that there is: tyrannic and wilful, impulsive and emotional decision making within one's own very personal domain of body or body image with owned body part dependent urgencies and requirements. To withstand these storms, a  prosthetic arm has to withstand not only the physical requirements of real life use (which it normally does not to a degree that will make your jaw drop), it also has to be acknowledged in that capacity by manufacturers and care-givers, emergency teams or repair units, where none of similarly urgencies are currently provided.

To even reach a level of "tool", to be useful enough to be accepted as technical solution (not as embodied "owned" limb), a typical prosthetic arm may have to undergo a most serious metamorphosis, from commercial parts (link)(link) to tuned and optimized parts (link). If you are in R&D and want to do something good in support of arm amputees, it may be relevant to address actual issues such as failing devices or phantom pain (link), before going all out on a limb and drag ill-defined concepts to a domain where they may wreck more than they really help.

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Footnotes   [ + ]

1. As in: piggy goes to market.

Embodiment of a prosthetic arm [reflections, thoughts, considerations]

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Embodiment of a prosthetic arm [reflections, thoughts, considerations]; published September 16, 2018, 15:42; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=8513.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1574123252, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Embodiment of a prosthetic arm [reflections, thoughts, considerations]}}, month = {September},year = {2018}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=8513}}


So, apparently I had been "identified" as a "super prosthesis user" by a group of researchers. And I was invited to talk about embodiment in context of the "rubber hand illusion" at a user interface or robotic control workshop [link].

So is that what I am: a "user"?

Tsk.

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Myoelectric arm dialog

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Myoelectric arm dialog; published February 10, 2017, 13:01; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=8492.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1574123252, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Myoelectric arm dialog}}, month = {February},year = {2017}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=8492}}


On the user discussion portals, things are often interesting and relevant as they are based on actual experiences. One question once was: "Is anyone able to tell me whether it is normal that my "bionic" hand breaks so many times within such a short amount of time? Do others have that problem as well?" - All text rewritten and paraphrased for anonymous quotation.

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"Robotics"/"Cyborg"-ism and prosthetic arms - state of the art, and choice of role of prosthesis within own body image [analysis post]

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - "Robotics"/"Cyborg"-ism and prosthetic arms - state of the art, and choice of role of prosthesis within own body image [analysis post]; published January 29, 2017, 17:23; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=7065.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1574123252, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - "Robotics"/"Cyborg"-ism and prosthetic arms - state of the art, and choice of role of prosthesis within own body image [analysis post]}}, month = {January},year = {2017}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=7065}}


Currently, "robotics" if not "bionics" and prosthetic arms are seen as a somewhat "hot topic". Even though some proponents sometimes appear to get lost in the apparent breadth of the field [link].

I am not following that research path myself too systematically (bwahaha), but I am interested in relevant aspects that fall off the truck, that are byproducts of that discussion, that may help me understand me or others better.

With "not  too systematically", I mean that I have tried and that I will try to walk new paths that have not been walked before: me introducing the Red Hand in 2009 was a first; introducing 2d cut pattern approaches to tackle 3d shape problems was not available anywhere else; wearing a semi-transparent white PVC glove to define the Becker Phantom hand, and getting Centri to make me red PVC gloves for my Becker hand was definitely another first; and me awkwardly mis-understanding the Cybathlon as an actually technical competition and as that being the only one to actually provide a technical write-up (an amputee "discussing" technical research, uiuiui!) definitely was a first (in fact we have not seen anyone else actually sitting their butt down and really telling us what, technically, we get to see there for that prosthetic arms race, which is like having a soccer match but no one understanding leave alone explaining how kicks, balls and possibly passes actually work). And, providing user driven developments for real work applications was also presented by me, in person, at that Cybathlon 2016 Symposium. Not that there were many like-minded individuals, no no.

So let us cut to the chase.

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iLimb / myoelectric arm: chronic skin rash due to local myoelectric skin electrode placement during bicycle ride [complication report] [bad hand days/weeks/month] (towards the AUA/WIFUCD dichotomy)

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - iLimb / myoelectric arm: chronic skin rash due to local myoelectric skin electrode placement during bicycle ride [complication report] [bad hand days/weeks/month] (towards the AUA/WIFUCD dichotomy); published January 29, 2017, 17:10; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=7130.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1574123252, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - iLimb / myoelectric arm: chronic skin rash due to local myoelectric skin electrode placement during bicycle ride [complication report] [bad hand days/weeks/month] (towards the AUA/WIFUCD dichotomy)}}, month = {January},year = {2017}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=7130}}


Testing myoelectric arm components in general: uncharted territories

Prosthetic arms in general do not usually appear to be tested a lot before getting thrown at the user, which is a statement that I find many examples for (glove may disintegrate all by itself; glove dies after just a few minutes of car washing; bolts never checked for size; etc.).

This is not to say that this is intrinsically bad - no. This is to say that the burden of testing and suffering the associated negative consequences of that also then reside with the user. If - at all - a company finds it unacceptable that users perform the testing and resulting discussions bad in any way, then (and only then) may they wish to consider a different type of product marketing and testing approach.

The question of whether manufacturers of prosthetic components test anything at all, also for skin safety, that question: it now also officially extends to skin electrodes.

As suggested by their ample advertising, a range of "bionic" myoelectric arms are demonstrated and shown around, as being able to sustain bicycle riding. So we have to assume that everyone seems to be of the opinion that it is cool to ride bikes, with, say, wearing an iLimb.

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#userdrivendesign Prosthetic arm design: i-Limb Revolution versus customized body powered arm in a work environment combining bodily exertion, wide temperature ranges, wide body motion ranges, heavy workload and subtle grips [Cybathlon Symposium, Oct 6 2016, Poster A12]

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - #userdrivendesign Prosthetic arm design: i-Limb Revolution versus customized body powered arm in a work environment combining bodily exertion, wide temperature ranges, wide body motion ranges, heavy workload and subtle grips [Cybathlon Symposium, Oct 6 2016, Poster A12]; published October 2, 2016, 13:05; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=6342.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1574123252, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - #userdrivendesign Prosthetic arm design: i-Limb Revolution versus customized body powered arm in a work environment combining bodily exertion, wide temperature ranges, wide body motion ranges, heavy workload and subtle grips [Cybathlon Symposium, Oct 6 2016, Poster A12]}}, month = {October},year = {2016}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=6342}}


PDF of poster presentation @ Cybathlon Symposium Oct 06 2016 @ Kloten.

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HumanXDesign - headbanging does not hurt if there is no wall [media idiocy]

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - HumanXDesign - headbanging does not hurt if there is no wall [media idiocy]; published July 23, 2016, 17:03; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=6224.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1574123252, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - HumanXDesign - headbanging does not hurt if there is no wall [media idiocy]}}, month = {July},year = {2016}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=6224}}


"Augmentation is about looking to the future. The question isn't 'should we or shouldn't we' because it's absolutely going to happen. We're speaking at the first conference on human augmentation and cyborgs: HumanxDesign. What do you think?"

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Being human #voightkampff - nondisabled vs. disabled people [scenarios]

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Being human #voightkampff - nondisabled vs. disabled people [scenarios]; published March 2, 2016, 18:11; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=5743.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1574123252, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Being human #voightkampff - nondisabled vs. disabled people [scenarios]}}, month = {March},year = {2016}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=5743}}


The mutual viewing of who of us when regarding each other is more, or less, human has a potentially big impact on societal cohesion.

Prosthetic arms today - at least inasmuch as the "bionic" arms hype is concerned - are by far a more societal than practical aspect, so these aspects play a massive role. Once even technical researchers give up honest technical work in their attempt to reach for the fame and society grapes, they start to attach themselves to a dynamic that is neither obvious nor cool. I already strongly advised arm amputees to abandon that social dynamic actively as not doing that will result in actual problems (link). But it starts smooth and nicely before escalating into what one might actually call "the Voight-Kampff chambers of hell of symbolic attribution in attempting mutual acceptance as human".

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Stump after wearing myoelectric "bionic" prosthesis for 10 hours [graphic #voightkampff]

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Stump after wearing myoelectric "bionic" prosthesis for 10 hours [graphic #voightkampff]; published May 5, 2014, 17:43; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=2979.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1574123252, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Stump after wearing myoelectric "bionic" prosthesis for 10 hours [graphic #voightkampff]}}, month = {May},year = {2014}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=2979}}


2 Comments

Any self respecting medical doctor, orthopedic surgeon, prosthetist, and "bionic" researcher will ask you - in a concerned professional way - "and, do you wear your prosthetic arm often, hopefully even daily?".

We also must accept that wearing "bionic" arms is nowadays assumed to constitute "human enhancement". This obviously is something I will directly and confrontatively label as bitter, ignorant, harsh and degrading cynicism.

If I do wear my prosthetic arm daily, in their view, that makes me a better human or even more human at the same time as I am, in their view, maybe not so much a better human but a "good doggy". Really and in fact, we have a reality split in that - at the same time and at once - my realities are two fold and split:

(1) Outside: On one hand, me trying to wear a prosthetic "super" hand - such as a "bionic" hand - makes my shape outline appear more like the shape outline of other people and so there is this aspect of possibly becoming a better, a deeper human. Conversely, the disfigurement of an arm stump thus makes me less of a human - and that is also what the face of many shee shee froo froo people, many so-called superficial people, will tell me when (or if) I look at them. Clearly, my amputated arm can make other people feel that I am less human. And it clearly does so on any given occasion. This is to a very small part remedied by me wearing this "bionic" apparatus - a machine for symbolism and "hope" far more than a machine for grasping, working, getting stuff done or feeling well.

(2) Inside: On the other hand, wearing a myoelectric arm is a really uncomfortable and skin damaging ordeal that is cumbersome and even in the best of all worlds painful. It feels bad to a degree, where I cannot possibly be totally human any more - as I have to push all normal human reactions such as pain, self respect, worry about the skin on my stump, fear of what all that pain does to me, etc. aside. There is a truly heartfelt authentic element in praising my stubborn wearing of a myoelectric "bionic" arm using the words "good doggy".

So, wearing a "bionic" myoelectric arm on the outside is an act of extreme humane-ness, it approximates the un-disfigured appearance like nothing else. As long as it does not approximate anything, it represents an 80'000 USD promise - and that is extreme in terms of symbolism.

At the very same time, what goes on inside the socket is beyond comprehension to many people - as it is not just not human, but worse, it has truly inhuman aspects. It lowers one, soul wise and as an individuum, in my view.

Here is how my stump looks like after a duration of 10 hours of wearing my iLimb Ultra Revolution at the office, typing and carrying light weight files, possibly holding a cup while rinsing it with water, photographed 1/2 and 7 hours after removing the prosthetic arm. To get the battery to last that long, I had switched the hand off for extended periods of time. Like, when I was typing. Never did my arm look like that after even hard work with the body powered arm such as jobs like hedge cutting [link], scrubbing [link] serious furniture moving [link] and so on. Yesterday I cut the hedges again, got rid of major amounts of stuff and moved a few hundred liters of green waste to the disposal with the body powered arm and really, the skin of my arm is not at all like what we see below - all is smooth and no problem. It is not the prosthesis as such that is a problem generally. It is the difficulty to achieve electrode fit and socket fit at once that really constitutes the "bionic" dilemma here, combined with hard lift and pull forces. Leg amputees can not understand from their own sockets, they experience different problems, not these. If it just was some simple body powered arms, or passive arms, we'd all be cool. Look, I am not saying "eeks, bad". I am saying, why the pansy boy type of immature excitement over what really is still problematic and massively overpriced technology when it comes to "bionic" arms? And here: can you reflect on the deeper meaning of what "bionic" arm wearing may entail?

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