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Category: Prosthetic hook

Subaru dashboard modifications [how it is that we ("we") are?]

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Subaru dashboard modifications [how it is that we ("we") are?]; published October 3, 2019, 17:23; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=10198.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1571240090, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Subaru dashboard modifications [how it is that we ("we") are?]}}, month = {October},year = {2019}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=10198}}


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Sometimes, being an arm amputee is just not what other people think it is.  Fucking isn't, really, anyway, but this is such a shining example. A long time ago, I started having a large roll of red sheet rubber at home, an industry size thing. And double sided sticky tape. And stuff like that. Like, an arm amputee whould need that type of stuff. How come "we" - "the" arm amputees - have materials such as that at home? If they do excavations in, say, 50 years, they may find thes things and go "WTF did that guy do with that".

And it remains a valid question for scholars that study us ("us"): you may read all the works of any official apointee about what one has to consider in terms of prostheses - but you will never find any word about sheet rubber and sticky tape as stuff to keep, alongside WD40.

To the best of my knowledge, therefore, you read that here first, too.

So here we go: Subaru dashboard modifications for the benefit of an arm amputee.

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Subaru Weathertech floormat mount [what it is that we ("we") do]

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Subaru Weathertech floormat mount [what it is that we ("we") do]; published October 3, 2019, 16:44; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=10207.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1571240090, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Subaru Weathertech floormat mount [what it is that we ("we") do]}}, month = {October},year = {2019}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=10207}}


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This is a bit of Extreme Cyborging microworks: how to make a car floor mat stay in place with sturdy, cheap materials?

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TRS Jaws [new product - first use report]

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - TRS Jaws [new product - first use report]; published August 10, 2019, 10:51; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=9769.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1571240090, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - TRS Jaws [new product - first use report]}}, month = {August},year = {2019}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=9769}}


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The TRS Jaws is a voluntary opening gripper where you can set the grip strength by a lever. The grip then varies between very light, maybe under 1 kg or so, to somewhere above 5 kg. This is a first real use report, after I used it permanently since roughly around May 21, 2019, give or take a few hours.

There are just a few points to address at this stage. If you wear a body powered arm for real work [link], you may now buy one.

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Adapting mountain bike (CUBE ACID 29", 2019) for left handed use [photos]

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Adapting mountain bike (CUBE ACID 29", 2019) for left handed use [photos]; published August 10, 2019, 10:17; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=9900.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1571240090, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Adapting mountain bike (CUBE ACID 29", 2019) for left handed use [photos]}}, month = {August},year = {2019}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=9900}}


"Last year, South Africa's Greg Minnaar (Santa Cruz Syndicate), a three-time UCI World Champion, won a record extending 20th Downhill World Cup in Fort William, Scotland. What made these wins unique was that they were the first World Cup events to be won on a bike with 29" wheels. (..) So does this mean the debate is over, and 29" wheels have replaced 27.5" ones? Not so fast!"-- Thinking about wheels? Michal Cerveny [UCI news]

As my trusted old Cube bike died due to age (profuse hydraulic leaks, spare parts > 1 month away, while on bike holidays) it was clear I had to replace it. So I bought the useful (but not overly expensive) CUBE ACID, with 29" wheels, model year 2019, for something over 900 Euros. The dealer gave me a lower price than the indicated / recommended one.

More history is here [link] with my coolest bike mod so far being the Colnago road bike with switched Ultegra levers [link].

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Soldering cable connection and heat shrinking tube over connection (Extreme Cyborging Microworks)

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Soldering cable connection and heat shrinking tube over connection (Extreme Cyborging Microworks); published April 4, 2019, 06:59; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=9463.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1571240090, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Soldering cable connection and heat shrinking tube over connection (Extreme Cyborging Microworks)}}, month = {April},year = {2019}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=9463}}


A full understanding what amputees do or do not in their real life has so far escaped the acumen of research and development. This explains how > 85% of us still run free, without the real restriction of having to pay massive money for technology that basically makes life more difficult.

A notable exception is my body powered split hook. As we can show how academics comprehensively fail to grasp (haha) the scope and use of prosthetic arm use, even a modest achievement such as this appears quite noteworthy and definitely reportable. After all, absolutely no (0) achievement was delivered by any R&D in the domain of myoelectric arms to this day that has made it to actual everyday use and hard work delivery, both since Cybathlon 2016 (that promised it would "push" development) and generally since >40 years of "research" into myoelectric arm control. As they all have more than a lot to learn (not advancing problematically high error rates in >40 years is a catastrophe or wouldn't you say), we are called upon to focus on the basic.

Today, how to attach the cable of a power supply to a pump.

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Prosthetic split-hooks are by far the MORE MODERN concept than prosthetic hands and they did not take long to get vilified [what you all got wrong about history]

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Prosthetic split-hooks are by far the MORE MODERN concept than prosthetic hands and they did not take long to get vilified [what you all got wrong about history]; published March 3, 2019, 23:01; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=9423.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1571240090, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Prosthetic split-hooks are by far the MORE MODERN concept than prosthetic hands and they did not take long to get vilified [what you all got wrong about history]}}, month = {March},year = {2019}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=9423}}


We are told by prosthetic R&D aficionados, by film makers, fiction authors, popular culture and whatnot, that a prosthetic hook (i.e., split-hook) is "old", and a prosthetic hand is "new". Also, we get told that myoelectric arms are very modern in terms of control technology, whereas some recent media and prosthetic manufacturers even called myoelectric control "brain control".

None of that is true, quite obviously, while we realize that reality is rather different. Rather strikingly different, in fact.

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Angular constraints of prosthetic grippers and functional success correlation [technical evaluation]

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Angular constraints of prosthetic grippers and functional success correlation [technical evaluation]; published February 11, 2019, 04:55; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=9322.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1571240090, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Angular constraints of prosthetic grippers and functional success correlation [technical evaluation]}}, month = {February},year = {2019}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=9322}}


I had evaluated, subjectively, the grip performance of various prosthetic options that I have. These have been already analysed in the context of grip taxonomy, where so far, research has largely focused on grip geometry as such, using some idiosyncratic logic that I found not too relevant.

Using a more relevant logic, I approached the question of grip mechanic from a different angle, both verbally and proverbially speaking: from a user angle, both actually geometrically and subjectively speaking.

I realized that most of my frequently used grips and grip situations fall into a far more narrow range of angle distributions than I had ever assumed.  So I sat down to add "typical object angles" to my already present grip success statistics over a list of my most frequently or typically used grips. Then I did that in theory and THEN I figured, why not go and video some. Thereby, a prosthetic hook as gripper device appears to be a lot more advanced, design wise, geometrically, in reducing device materials, bulk and design to approximate a really good overall use performance than the iLimb (which I have here also for as much testing as I like) and with that, many current commercial (or other) multi articulated hands.

In fact, prosthetic hands appear to be by far the older (and thus possibly less reflected) geometric design idea of a prosthetic arm's terminal device than the definitely more modern split hook. I may also go history hunting, but the claim that a split hook is old or outdated, and that therefore by inference a prosthetic hand is automatically new or more modern, as an idea, is wrong, particularly technically speaking. But also historically, to replace a hand with a hand is a straightforward design idea, that does not take any imagination, thus it is reportedly old, very old.

The far more elegant reduction, also of angles and controls, to fit into the limited action and option constraints of an arm amputee, is certainly that of a body powered split hook. It boils down the prosthetic needs to a successful sleek elegant reduction of a functional minimum, making it the ideal choice for anyone that wants a maximum of performance from a minimum of failure, cost, decay, bulk, futile grip attempts and total overhead. The subtle distinction is that a "body powered split hook" is an entirely different beast than a passive hook, obviously, which probably no one ever noticed, particularly not the people that assumed that a body powered split hook is best portrayed by installing a "Captain Hook" metaphor.

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CE marking or norm in relation to components for prosthetic arms

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - CE marking or norm in relation to components for prosthetic arms; published December 25, 2018, 15:20; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=7749.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1571240090, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - CE marking or norm in relation to components for prosthetic arms}}, month = {December},year = {2018}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=7749}}


CE-marking or norm

The CE-marking establishes that a particular item or product conform to European product law in relation to health, safety, and environmental protection standards [link].

As this text is not public or may be hard to get into the public eye, why not just go ahead and drag it out. I started to be interested by the backgrounds of what our prosthetic limbs and their technical documentation ideally could be already a few years ago [link].  So, a few blog posts here do have a long history, longer than others, and were assembled over quite a period of time.

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Disability and the public - prosthetic arms and more: do we appear "competent"? (review)

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Disability and the public - prosthetic arms and more: do we appear "competent"? (review); published December 7, 2018, 15:50; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=8812.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1571240090, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Disability and the public - prosthetic arms and more: do we appear "competent"? (review)}}, month = {December},year = {2018}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=8812}}


The current view of us, what the general public thinks of us, seems to be a major aspect. Of "us", yes.

The research question for this armchair analyst thus will be: are we - arm amputees in specific, and, as people with a visible physical handicap more generally, more broadly as disabled people generally, seen as competent people?

Generally, the answer seems to be a clear "NO" right from the outset.

This should not come as a shock. There are good reasons to believe that, great reasons to make that plausible, perfect reasons to justify that statement. With that, there may be exceptions to that -  people that see through society's fairytales of disability, horror and fears, but they are usually the exception.

As I had figured out quite early into my enquiries into that issue, that this aspect is of absolutely no further practical concern not because it is not disconcerting - but because I cannot change it. And that is a rapid, lean and cynical logical consequence, that I stopped caring about what other people think of me based on, say, visual impression of my prosthetic arm. I may thus safely focus on function and comfort, sustainability and cost, without worrying too much about whether other people treat me as more or less competent based on my looks. Not because it would not be cool to take influence but because it is of no matter as to the target dimension: the tendendy to disregard any mental capacity of people with physical handicap appears to be implemented in many people's thinking outside of any actual experiences. And regardless of what type of prosthesis I wear.

If anything, I might optimize my appearance by simply trying to look reasonably neat.

But to bend over backwards for what really we have to concede are actually strange people? If anything, can we hack their brains?

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How to apply wood screws in series - demonstration, difficulties [bench work]

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - How to apply wood screws in series - demonstration, difficulties [bench work]; published October 26, 2018, 14:52; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=8717.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1571240090, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - How to apply wood screws in series - demonstration, difficulties [bench work]}}, month = {October},year = {2018}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=8717}}


I happily cut and mounted two wooden boards into a pre-existing shelf frame. For that, a series of wood screws were put into place.

If you are interested in mount, assembly, and screws, read these earlier posts, too:

Dismantling, loading, transporting, unloading and reassembling shelf [bimanual, activity] {illustration, a peek into the life of a person with a handicap}

 

Drill a screw [1-handed way]

The ultimate bimanual task - the IKEA Pax wardrobe system with gliding doors [tricks,tips and yeehaw]

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Understanding and informing design issues of a prosthetic arm for below elbow amputation by way of "taxonomy" [literature review, reality check]

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Understanding and informing design issues of a prosthetic arm for below elbow amputation by way of "taxonomy" [literature review, reality check]; published July 26, 2018, 21:18; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=7651.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1571240090, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Understanding and informing design issues of a prosthetic arm for below elbow amputation by way of "taxonomy" [literature review, reality check]}}, month = {July},year = {2018}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=7651}}


The academic and industrial attempts to approach prosthetic arms so far have been met with less success than the providers must have hoped for. Far less, in fact so little that we wonder what is going on.

Possibly, design issues are the key to this as however vaguely put, some analytic approach needs to inform better design - but how to really inform better design from issues based on analysis? What is a suitable analysis? If we cannot see any better designs anywhere in practice, real life, then what is the analysis worth? Can we analyze analyses to get a better understanding of what might be going on there?

We might best start with what we know to be true.

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Experienced user based advice for investors in the domain of prosthetic arms [technical guide for understanding the field]

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Experienced user based advice for investors in the domain of prosthetic arms [technical guide for understanding the field]; published July 26, 2018, 15:17; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=8702.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1571240090, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Experienced user based advice for investors in the domain of prosthetic arms [technical guide for understanding the field]}}, month = {July},year = {2018}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=8702}}


Investors may need to understand what prosthetic arms really are, how they come about, and what is there to be considered, before investing into a prosthetic arm component manufacturer or research spin off.

With a realistic estimate of around 85% rejection rate, the prosthetic arm industry so far is one of the most unsuccessful industries that there are both in high-tech and medicine technology.

Now, what usually keeps developments, market introductions and user feedback as well as improvement circles going is a successful social setting. Such a really successful circle, where respect combines with a striving for technical proficiency, in the context of prosthetic arms, appears to be largely absent. To a great part, this explains why the current status with regard to marketing, improving or successfully selling prosthetic arms is not a lot better than maybe sixty years ago.

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3D-print molded Protosil RTV 245 (durometer shore 40A) silicone covers for Toughware Equilux [proof of concept, demo of "bionic" grip]

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - 3D-print molded Protosil RTV 245 (durometer shore 40A) silicone covers for Toughware Equilux [proof of concept, demo of "bionic" grip]; published February 4, 2018, 11:50; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=8248.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1571240090, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - 3D-print molded Protosil RTV 245 (durometer shore 40A) silicone covers for Toughware Equilux [proof of concept, demo of "bionic" grip]}}, month = {February},year = {2018}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=8248}}


It is sometimes more fun to present the technical results before or even instead of explaining exactly why.  So in short, I 3d-designed and then printed molds to make grip covers for really serious grip performance of a Toughware Equilux device.

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