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Category: Art

Disability and the public - prosthetic arms and more: do we appear "competent"? (review)

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Disability and the public - prosthetic arms and more: do we appear "competent"? (review); published December 7, 2018, 15:50; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=8812.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1571794785, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Disability and the public - prosthetic arms and more: do we appear "competent"? (review)}}, month = {December},year = {2018}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=8812}}


The current view of us, what the general public thinks of us, seems to be a major aspect. Of "us", yes.

The research question for this armchair analyst thus will be: are we - arm amputees in specific, and, as people with a visible physical handicap more generally, more broadly as disabled people generally, seen as competent people?

Generally, the answer seems to be a clear "NO" right from the outset.

This should not come as a shock. There are good reasons to believe that, great reasons to make that plausible, perfect reasons to justify that statement. With that, there may be exceptions to that -  people that see through society's fairytales of disability, horror and fears, but they are usually the exception.

As I had figured out quite early into my enquiries into that issue, that this aspect is of absolutely no further practical concern not because it is not disconcerting - but because I cannot change it. And that is a rapid, lean and cynical logical consequence, that I stopped caring about what other people think of me based on, say, visual impression of my prosthetic arm. I may thus safely focus on function and comfort, sustainability and cost, without worrying too much about whether other people treat me as more or less competent based on my looks. Not because it would not be cool to take influence but because it is of no matter as to the target dimension: the tendendy to disregard any mental capacity of people with physical handicap appears to be implemented in many people's thinking outside of any actual experiences. And regardless of what type of prosthesis I wear.

If anything, I might optimize my appearance by simply trying to look reasonably neat.

But to bend over backwards for what really we have to concede are actually strange people? If anything, can we hack their brains?

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Alex Roy and comparing junk with what "real men" wear [consumer products and society]

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Alex Roy and comparing junk with what "real men" wear [consumer products and society]; published December 9, 2017, 18:25; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=7871.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1571794785, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Alex Roy and comparing junk with what "real men" wear [consumer products and society]}}, month = {December},year = {2017}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=7871}}


In one of his many videos, Alex Roy discusses style and coolness of automobiles with a TV show host. They establish that clearly, a car that transcends time in coolness and ultimate grunt has these two qualities: 

  • the most reliable in terms of motor and drivetrain, with adequate modern materials
  • the most fitting where necessary classical, conventional. established or optimized shape factor

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The Cybathlon as iconic Trash Culture modern day Circus show: arm amputees, arms race and technical considerations regarding specific applicants [proper research domain assignment, pre-race evaluation of critical check points, detailed in-race grip analysis, cultural domain considerations, gonzo race report]

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - The Cybathlon as iconic Trash Culture modern day Circus show: arm amputees, arms race and technical considerations regarding specific applicants [proper research domain assignment, pre-race evaluation of critical check points, detailed in-race grip analysis, cultural domain considerations, gonzo race report]; published October 7, 2016, 17:28; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=6378.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1571794785, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - The Cybathlon as iconic Trash Culture modern day Circus show: arm amputees, arms race and technical considerations regarding specific applicants [proper research domain assignment, pre-race evaluation of critical check points, detailed in-race grip analysis, cultural domain considerations, gonzo race report]}}, month = {October},year = {2016}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=6378}}


Executive summary

  • Arm amputation is more a social (and complex) than just a manual handicap in many daily situations. Therefore many approaches to dealing with it are social and socially motivated, including hand color. You did land on a right below elbow amputation website, like, apparently, so that is the angle from which this comes. Also we made sure this is the title of this website. Different aspects may apply to higher level and bilateral arm amputation, but that is not the target of this website.
  • Conversely, most actually manual problems are not major. What heavily impacts many unilateral arm amputees after 5-8 years or maybe after 10 -20 years, is the impact of overuse of the intact arm and asymmetry related problems. A rational approach to prevent that is to use prosthetic arms that excel particularly at the heavy to extreme range of physical exposure. Those are typically modern body powered arms. These use well established control principles, but can be made from very modern materials. They suffer from medial representations that are largely negative ("Captain Hook"). Myoelectric arms are termed "high tech" simply because they may contain a battery and motors, but they suffer from a battery of intractable or constrained problem combinations.
  • For that, the ETH has so far not been necessary to add to the field of prosthetic arms, but trash culture approaches have a lot going for them regardless of that. My own practical and pragmatic research (see also below) contains such elements and now, the ETH also is proud organizer of a Circus freak show (which in essence is an event that lacks academic approaches and reduces intellectual participation to staring).
  • Neither the ETH nor the NCCR Robotics ever managed to acknowledge that or develop even the tiniest solution to solve just about anything in that matter (remember the title of this page?). That is perfectly OK as quite possibly, myoelectric arms are uninteresting from an actual researcher point of view once one understands the full scope of problems, and body powered arms are uninteresting because their problems are a combination of mechanics, material science, and context dependent issues that usually require deep insights which is currently performed by a small relatively close knit international community of amputees, developers and researchers.
  • Given their academic background claims, ETH or NCCR based approaches could and should have focused on studying intricate differences and aspects of prosthetic arm success and failure during the Cybathlon competition in all situations, pre-race and in-race. I mean: if you claim you want to do, or push, research, better sit down and work on a really detailed introductory explanation to show that we all see how much you understand what detailed features we are all looking for. I am most definitely all for that, but I do not shy away from weird staring contest evaluations either. These define an amputee's daily reality more than you might like.
  • But to no surprise, the technical research representatives neither prepared, nor carried out, such, so any technical analysis of the race that then was presented to the public to actually increase some real understanding for the effectively present research problems and real world issues so it will never be possible in sufficient detail or write any great scientific paper about it. Or, not from how it looks now.
  • Thus, academically (not industrially, not as bystander, person that loves to stare at arm amputees or spectator), the event of the Cybathlon prosthetic arm race was a thoroughly missed opportunity if not a failure.
  • This does not mean that the Cybathlon as such was meaningless; it just showed that body powered technology (TRS, TRS prehensor) as very calmly and perfectly performed and carried out by a 67 year old man (Bob Radocy) that did not visibly hurry but chewed gum for the whole event left all "robotic" competition behind - while I had warned the organizers from a one-dimensional overly simplistic evaluation two years ago. I had always told them exactly what Claudia Breidbach said in her statement after the finals race: you cannot compare, across various different arm amputation with adapted different devices, what a good performance is. They knew as they had been extensively informed beforehand. The search for what prosthetic arms should be able to actually do well remains ongoing though, the odyssey apparently continues with a Cybathlon 2020.
  • And while any evidence based rational mind would now more than ever (a) want a body powered prosthesis and (b) further research on that type of prosthesis, it was the very clear aim by the organizers to not include these arms in the race at all, until I had imposed myself onto the organizers, had a very serious word with them and convinced them to admit also body powered arms which they did.
  • The Swiss National Foundation (SNF) is strongly advised to look into the intricate aspects of all failures of (a) research opportunities missed and (b) strategic solutions actually needed in prosthetic arm and hand field, (c) appoint very competent coordinators and advisors there and (d) not finance silly "competitions" such as this that do not further science at all or (e) finance more myoelectric nonsense.
  • All the same, the Cybathlon was a great experience in how ETH hype, tech media hype and gadget hand industry hype take a royal tanking against real life based real men, and, if you need a short but intensive read on the reasons why the myoelectric arms missed out today, check my Cybathlon Symposium scientific contribution, you will find there more relevant text than in many other places.
  • I do not hate myoelectric arms. Personally I must have invested more finances into my own myoelectric gadgets than into my body powered components. However, that does not make me blind, dumb or gadget happy. I still test, look, think and analyze. I still work on finding better ways, solutions, parts or usage tricks for both systems. But then, coming from an engineering perspective (funny you come here to read that) - finding the exact problem, identifying the exact issue, has been placed before being ablt to solving it. And the simple beauty of engineering is, that whatever your attempt at covering up your tricks, at the end of the day, the contraption either works, or it does not.
  • While Professor Riener verbally once (1) at the Cybathlon race itself mentioned the fact that cable powered technology won (we were there, see Gonzo report below), they made sure none of that leaked to the Swiss television, or BBC, or newspapers, or IEEE, or other press. They simply buried the fact that they were left eating dust by some very athletic older gentleman wearing a body powered prosthetic arm. Because that is like having someone in sandals and swim trunks run up on Mount Everest. They do not report that as it is seen as putting the other efforts to shame rather than being seen as someone, something, a situation to finally learn from. And that puts massive question marks to the news writers, tech representatives and researchers: is what you do something we have to believe, because quite clearly, facts are not consistent with it? Do you represent a type of religion or belief system?
  • Not all are like that. The Scientific American, a journal that I am a subscriber and reader of since many, many years, reports extremely well, and explains the actual technical aspects of the winning device.
  • The Cybathlon was announced as competition that allows visitors to "understand the issues surrounding disability in a practical way". When not even the organizers understand these issues, and not even in a theoretical way, how on earth can they assume an ability to instruct visitors so they understand disability issues?

Trash Culture, the Cybathlon prosthetic arms race show Circus, and other prosthetic limb Trash Culture approaches

"Mommy, do I have to repeat every mistake others made before me myself?" - "Yes, one can learn so much from mistakes".

Don't get me wrong here.

Trash Culture is a great contemporary experience. If anything, this is what gets people talking. But it is not research or academic. This is not at all a critique, but an attempt to better localize this strange event in context of prosthetic arms, amputation and society.

It is just a Circus.

To unmake it a Circus and Make It a Technical Contest, a bit more attention to detail would have be needed. A lot more attention to detail would have made it a great event. That all was missed.

Now, I will supplement you with the required extra details below to make it a research observation despite the organizers successful attempts to keep it simple, hip, sexy and trashy .... but let that not spoil the fun for you.

boot

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Thorstein Veblen - The Leisure Class Society (and how it applies to current trends in prosthetic arm "design")

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Thorstein Veblen - The Leisure Class Society (and how it applies to current trends in prosthetic arm "design"); published May 30, 2016, 22:44; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=6049.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1571794785, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Thorstein Veblen - The Leisure Class Society (and how it applies to current trends in prosthetic arm "design")}}, month = {May},year = {2016}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=6049}}


From (link):

Thorstein Veblen (1857-1929) is known in sociology for his famous work on conspicuous consumption. He also shares with the classical theorists of his day a focal interest in issues relating to production, especially the contradiction between the potential of industrial production to fulfill society's needs and the interests of businessmen to earn a profit.

The field of prosthetic arms draws up a massive tension field spanning both workmanship and highest leisure class aspirations. To demonstrate credibly that one could be manually able (without having to prove it) currently is the largest leap of faith that companies that sell "bionic" arms require. In return they offer not much.

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Missing hand, hook, and perceived risk [sociology of fables leaking into modern day perceptions]

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Missing hand, hook, and perceived risk [sociology of fables leaking into modern day perceptions]; published May 30, 2016, 22:40; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=4681.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1571794785, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Missing hand, hook, and perceived risk [sociology of fables leaking into modern day perceptions]}}, month = {May},year = {2016}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=4681}}


Fables and fairy tales carry narratives whose symbolism swaps over into apparently secular perceptions [1]. In other words, even societies that claim to be educated, enlightened and secular typically risk to follow myths - unless they take very specific care to not get trapped there.

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[1] S. White, "Severed Hands as Symbols of Humanity in Legend and Popular Narratives," , 2014.
[Bibtex]
@article{white2014severed,
  title={Severed Hands as Symbols of Humanity in Legend and Popular Narratives},
  author={White, Scott},
  year={2014}
}

What to do once your arm has mindboggling amounts of DOF but your stump can only address 2-3 ? [tech scifi stuff]

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - What to do once your arm has mindboggling amounts of DOF but your stump can only address 2-3 ? [tech scifi stuff]; published March 8, 2016, 19:08; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=5779.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1571794785, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - What to do once your arm has mindboggling amounts of DOF but your stump can only address 2-3 ? [tech scifi stuff]}}, month = {March},year = {2016}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=5779}}


Currently, media are swamped with the display of what they call "phantom limb project" (really not the first time that someone uses "phantom" for a prosthetic arm; read about my Becker Phantom hand from 3 years ago right here). So apparently, some prosthetic technician spent major amounts of time trying to construct this computer game look-a-like arm to a degree where its user apparently considers that he is a cyborg with an additional "cyborg mother", as if prosthetic parts have parents, too. Yeah, and my website also has a "cyborg father". If you listen for him, you might hear him breathe, "...khhhhh-ccccchhhhhhhhh-khhhhhhh-czzzzzh...".

dvader

Where is Amber Case, when we need her.

Now, while that Metal Gear inspired prosthetic arm design worn by James Young certainly does not look like it is going to wreck major brick walls any time soon, they might explore entirely different aspects of such equipment.

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Visualizing a Broken Body - Cyborg art implications for visual and functional prosthetic design [art, cultural reflection]

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Visualizing a Broken Body - Cyborg art implications for visual and functional prosthetic design [art, cultural reflection]; published July 10, 2015, 19:30; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=4880.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1571794785, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Visualizing a Broken Body - Cyborg art implications for visual and functional prosthetic design [art, cultural reflection]}}, month = {July},year = {2015}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=4880}}


Introduction

It has been remarked by individuals that believe of themselves to be quite observant - such as - that a prosthetic hook is, culturally, referencing "Captain Hook", such as Geoffrey Ling, and although we cannot think greatly of people that spit on established, proven and functioning prosthetic devices, we can try to see where they come from. What they do is look at popular culture to shape their unreflected but acid critique.

chook

Their problem is only, that they do not keep looking at popular culture. They just go half way to name Captain Hook (if they go that far at all) in talking bad about hook devices, when really they do not consider popular culture all the way. If at all, they should do that with heart and with focus. How can I believe any researchers that talks down to me, as a hook user, by referring to terms such as "arcane" and "Captain Hook", when they are culturally unaware? Because when they are sloppy with their pop culture, what tells me they are not totally sloppy with their "technical" work? Alright, one glance at the edgy iLimb hand and torn up gloves and we know that answer. After all, if one is to look at pop culture, it is not just about extending research programs for preconceived ideas that end up without accessible devices on a small market, is it. It is not just about trying to sell "bionic" hands that may be just about as useful as a bugger in the nose (but cost more). It is about actually trying to understand what that popular culture can tell us were one to go that way, all the way.

And Captain Hook is the earliest pop culture "cyborg" in that he, in some way, integrates human body and technology under a new umbrella identity, that of "Captain Hook". As a famous tweet proposed: if he was given a prosthetic hand, he'd be "Captain Hand". Would have been quite a game changer, that.

Analysis of popular culture imagery and their significance for amputees

The way a damaged body is visualized both when in despair, when suffering damage or disintegration or loss, and when it is at ease, repaired, is present throughout our cultures.

So we can not only look at what the non-disabled public believes in when portraying damage or loss. We can also have a close look at visual elements of recovered, re-established people, and here, people that are "bound" to repair type technology.

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CHINA!! Striking new 3D print multi touch hightech arm hand prosthesis with "Rick" type integration [rr/ high tech advance]

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - CHINA!! Striking new 3D print multi touch hightech arm hand prosthesis with "Rick" type integration [rr/ high tech advance]; published May 30, 2015, 10:48; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=4905.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1571794785, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - CHINA!! Striking new 3D print multi touch hightech arm hand prosthesis with "Rick" type integration [rr/ high tech advance]}}, month = {May},year = {2015}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=4905}}


Prosthetic advancement knows no limits. Chinese high quality manufacturing has reached new heights both in computer [link] and automotive technology [link]. With that, rapid prototyping with advanced laser sintering [link] has reached unprecedented new levels in arm prosthetics [link].

3dprintspeed

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Mad Max Fury Road - fictional arm amputee "Imperator Furiosa" played by Charlize Theron [review]

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Mad Max Fury Road - fictional arm amputee "Imperator Furiosa" played by Charlize Theron [review]; published May 18, 2015, 18:26; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=4762.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1571794785, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Mad Max Fury Road - fictional arm amputee "Imperator Furiosa" played by Charlize Theron [review]}}, month = {May},year = {2015}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=4762}}


1 Comment

Again, the Punch & Judy department of Warner Brothers throws a faked disability, a faux handicap, at us, in their Mad Max: Fury Road (2015) movie, and again, we consider it, just as we considered the attempts in Kingsman, or, Home of the Brave (2006), or, maybe in the ill-fated attempt for cinema titled "Hancock". Hell, they even may get an Oscar for this faux arm disability centered charade!

And, yes, I do review movies (that I come across) that feature (possibly faked or real) arm amputees. Why, and from what angle? See, society shapes our perceptions of arm amputees, and while that may bypass your butt stone cold, I have to directly deal with the fall-out of that. With arm amputees being a real rarity in our society (link), the average person on the street will have had exposure to a lot more "on-screen" amputees -real or, mostly, fake - than actual encounters. Before meeting me as the single encounter, the average person on the street may have subliminally absorbed 3-4 movie arm amputees. So media matter in that they directly impact my own social experience. Clearly, that does not impact you at all - but may I add that it was you that came here to begin with, and, did you consider this blog's title? Also, I suffer from synaesthetic pain which directly affects how I feel also while watching such a movie.

So I am not asking so much whether a particular fairy tale, being told as a movie or so, is consistent in itself and represents a standalone piece of art, as such and regardless of the time and culture it was made in. Instead, I want to know with what type of stereotype you will leave the cinema. After all, these movies all build on stereotypes.

And in my everyday encounters, media stereotype priming may provide a somewhat dominant aspect in how the real life encounter starts.

It is a decisive aspect, really, and quite honestly, one has no control over that, neither you as the mostly un-reflected movie consumer, nor me, as the person that can only watch and see and not give any comment to prevent the unavoidable communication ship wreck from happening. A real minority of people may seem to have no relevant preconceived notions, such as maybe 1/400 or so - but by and large, everyone and their grandmother thinks the same idiotic stuff like, hooks are evil (and just why that is so totally fucked up can be read here), ""bionic" arms are cool" (and just why that then is so fucked up can be seen here, where it is explained that you fail the Voight Kampff test right then and there), and more.

And as we are visually being told in this movie about Mad Max and Furiosa, the female arm amputee is abandoned in the end, by Max, who walks out staring at her, without any further ado, with the handicap visually increasing and getting bigger in the camera focus - then, that is supposed to be cool, just because.. it is a movie that sends a message that we need, .. because it is "Mad Max", ... because it is Charlize Theron playing in it, ... or why? Of course you are free to interpret all kinds of stuff into this movie - I just looked at it and discussed what there is to see.

With such messages being told by mass media to the masses, it is a totally open question just "how cool" that really is, given that among all amputees, the suicide rate of arm amputees seems to be highest. Of course, "Houston, we have a problem". We have no lobby, as arm amputees, all we seem to be on that scale is clay type material for idiotic story writers. And while each and every other Hollywood blockhead character somehow stumbles into a "happy" ending, here for some reason, there cannot be any "happy" ending? A comprehensively "cited" "one armed dove hunt" as very clear indicator of what cultural aspects are the movie's center piece? A strong visual focus on simulating a disability with an amputated arm, while other aspects - red eyes in traveling in sand storm deserts - are entirely neglected?

With stereotypes being traded as such, this warrants a closer look.

So, what do they do there? Is this movie any good on a social and emotional level? And, before glorifying it just because [link][link] (they even write "watch Furiosa punch Max in the face, with her nubbins" which she really doesn't; she punches him with her hand while sticking the nubbins out in the air) - why not actually *use* our eyes, to look, to ogle, to view, and (in a more strict sense) "watch" it? It is so much a visual and so not much a verbal movie, so we (including you) really have to switch on our eyesies. Not assume, or make up, or invent. Just watch. What is there to be actually seen, what do they really show? Is this empowering or what does it really say, in graphic language?

Prosthetic arm - details, features

The prosthetic arm in Mad Max: Fury Road in essence contains a glorified claw.

It is notable that the usage of hooks and other non-human looks previously were used as elements of evil, and of non-humaneness [link]. The repeated medial distortion did have a serious impact as it deterred thousands of arm amputees from accepting a functional prosthetic hook and spawned a whole industry of rubber puppetry dubbed "bionic" hands [link] that cost our health and accident insurances hundreds of thousands of dollars - which would be alright were these hands even halfway "useful". But far from it, and not a word of apology of any of these media clowns.

Now here, a prosthetic arm is presented that hangs off the digitally edited screen appearance of Charlize Theron who appears to not contain a physical handicap herself.

CFCOVk2VIAAtpzh.jpg large

This arm here was called "Dayna's arm" simply because Charlize Theron's stunt double, Dayna Grant, was wearing it for the shootings.

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Über das Design und Aussehen der Armprothese

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Über das Design und Aussehen der Armprothese; published October 6, 2014, 19:32; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=3497.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1571794785, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Über das Design und Aussehen der Armprothese}}, month = {October},year = {2014}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=3497}}


Beim Aussehen geht es um Starren, Ansehen, es geht in zweiter Linie um territoriale Ansprüche, und dann um intuitive Kompetenzeinschätzung.

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Very cool 3D printed arm [3D printing]

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Very cool 3D printed arm [3D printing]; published August 26, 2014, 06:49; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=3419.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1571794785, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Very cool 3D printed arm [3D printing]}}, month = {August},year = {2014}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=3419}}


From the MAKE website [link] we now read that some design student by the name of Evan Kuester [link] came up with the coolest actual 3D prosthetic ever. We did see great prototypes that never made it to any amputee - but here, things are totally different. Here the design starts on an arm that wears it, and it does create the smiles such an arm is supposed to create.

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If only for one second [dream about it?]

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - If only for one second [dream about it?]; published December 10, 2013, 13:30; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=2595.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1571794785, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - If only for one second [dream about it?]}}, month = {December},year = {2013}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=2595}}


The following idea of the Mimi Foundation is what makes this subject worth exploring:

"You know what I miss the most? Being carefree." Here is the sentence that inspired the "if only for a second" project. June 17th, 2013 , the Mimi Foundation in collaboration with Leo Burnett France, invited 20 cancer patients to participate in a unique makeover experience . This film shows the adventure.

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People are people are people are people [shop window mannequins: incredibly good campaign]

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - People are people are people are people [shop window mannequins: incredibly good campaign]; published December 5, 2013, 05:57; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=2541.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1571794785, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - People are people are people are people [shop window mannequins: incredibly good campaign]}}, month = {December},year = {2013}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=2541}}


[Article in German]

And as soon as one believes that one has seen it all - screetch, something new comes up that is so unbelievably good.

Because since a while, I do not visit real clothes or shoe shops so often any more. Every now and then maybe, but much rather, I order stuff on-line. With a visible handicap, Zurich's clothes or shoe shops just may not be the best place to go or be.

By far the worst, of course, is the Walder shoe shop in the Glatt shopping center. Usually, at least one shoe sales force employee takes it upon herself to take a hard unabashed observant stare at me, from safe distance, while I struggle to bind the shoe in an attempt to try them on. The. Shoe. Singular (not plural). Simply because I usually don't make it past one shoe. The staring there is not comfortable. Maybe, I want to feel at ease? Maybe, I just want to try on a few shoes and not be bothered in that way? But not always one has to bear getting started at by one employee. It also happened that three of them stood next to each other, lined up, at a safe 5 meter distance, to take a full, unabridged, entirely frame filling Baroque stare at me while I tried on some type of winter boot. Three staring idiots, that is not negotiable with me. No embarrassment there, no remorse, and definitely no apology. That is an aspect of shopping in and around Zurich.

So, I do hate going to these shops, rarely are sales people a true help there. More often, they wreck my day. In many regards, not buying anything there is more likely to make my days rich and beautiful. And to arrive there, as people that run shops, and that attempt to sell their stuff, is an achievement on its own, one has to hand them that. There are rare exceptions, really great clothes or shoe sales people that treat me as an adult customer. These exist. Just to so frequently.

But now, there are these shape variations in shop window mannequins. One has to see these.

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