expletive-ethereal
expletive-ethereal
expletive-ethereal
expletive-ethereal

Category: Neptune swimming

Body core strength - LUNOCET 015 - peaceful Lake of Zurich freestyle LUNOCET swimming [summer break]

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Body core strength - LUNOCET 015 - peaceful Lake of Zurich freestyle LUNOCET swimming [summer break]; published August 11, 2011, 13:29; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=468.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1574148562, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Body core strength - LUNOCET 015 - peaceful Lake of Zurich freestyle LUNOCET swimming [summer break]}}, month = {August},year = {2011}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=468}}


1 Comment

I bought myself a LUNOCET 015 monofin [manufacturer] [SciAm article]. Certainly one of the more wicked pieces of equipment for people with too much energies to burn off. It basically is an extremely well designed fin that enhances your body waves and leg kicks that you can then do with a full blast to speed ahead.

People that read this blog know that I find some 30'000 USD or more for a piece of prosthetic arm gadgetry too much. Some people fail to understand why. Buying a contraption is one thing - but seeing what it does to you emotionally and mentally (once you have it) is quite another. Too much focus on ill-guided gadgetry with the wrong gadgets - and you will end up with a serious depression. Maybe it is because there are so many *other* things to do that really fill my heart.

This here is just a small snow flake, on a tip of an iceberg of what there is to do to fill one's heart with the sheer joy of motion. And so one of the things I can do instead of buying an iLimb, Michelangelo hand or BeBionic, is to park my ~ 30'000 USD or howevermuch money in the right spot, and simply use the interest rate to ride off into the sunset, to buy a Lunocet, and / or to go on holidays somewhere outlandish or do some other stuff that's really good for me.

There are folks that - missing a limb - look for replacement for that missing limb to do anything - to go swimming, for other stuff they do. It is not hard to understand that approach but it is not the only approach there is. One other approach that I started to work on is to manualize the rest of the world instead - including other body parts, immediate surroundings and even by including other people for certain moment of assistance for example. One can then pull apart certain aspects of this - posture, tasks, appearance, balance in motion, to find more creative and even more powerful solutions. In fact, the research head of a robot lab highlighted this to me when - upon visiting their lab - he admitted that robotics (or prosthetics) never would solve the task of replacing a human hand, and that already me adopting other people - for company, for sports, you name it - to solve my own amputation based problems - social, practical, et cetera - was the far better solution in many ways than society spending millions on trying to find the perfect robot hand. But the public doesn't know about this, so let us keep it a secret. In a way this confirms my rather simple minded attempts to assemble a really robust body powered prosthetic arm as a simple tool that holds up to daily requirements - a feasible and realistic task, one where there is light at the end of the tunnel. Real joy and fun is found elsewhere - it is, what you do with (or without) these tools.

This is me, doing some peaceful LUNOCET 015 cruises in the Lake of Zurich. Yes, without added push, I am that fast. I already loved butterfly swimming but this really pushes it. This, by far, surpasses the amount of calm joy that can be gotten out of a number of other activities, including purchase of a myoelectric hand. And if someone offers me one gadget, I'd be a fool not evaluate some other gadgets, wouldn't I. Water sports was always something I liked but I never stopped missing my right hand so much than when going full speed with my Lunocet, and that is maybe why this blog entry belongs here, rather than just on some general water fun webpage.

Read More

Double amputee mermaid tail swimming [science fiction come true]

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Double amputee mermaid tail swimming [science fiction come true]; published April 10, 2011, 15:01; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=395.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1574148562, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Double amputee mermaid tail swimming [science fiction come true]}}, month = {April},year = {2011}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=395}}


5 Comments

From Weta Workshop, New Zealand:

Every aspect of the tail has been custom made to Vessey's body using a blend of 3D modelling and milling technology, combined with Vi Vac vacforming, and a poly carbonate spine and tail fin. The skin of the tail has been made from a layer of neoprene and a lycra outer-layer digitally printed with a stunning ‘scale' pattern, that was designed by one of our concept artists. Vessey was born with a condition that meant her legs would never develop properly, but began swimming after she had her first leg amputated at seven. Despite having her other leg amputated at 16, she swam competitively in high school and now swims as often as she can. Vessey says she is thinking of using the tail to help her complete the swimming section of a triathlon.

How so very cool of the Weta Workshop staff to do this!

Read More

Funny title for a product - "Design: Prosthetic Flippers Could Help Amputees Swim Again"

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Funny title for a product - "Design: Prosthetic Flippers Could Help Amputees Swim Again"; published November 16, 2010, 23:30; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=368.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1574148562, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Funny title for a product - "Design: Prosthetic Flippers Could Help Amputees Swim Again"}}, month = {November},year = {2010}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=368}}


1 Comment

I dig this title they put up. I never waited for some plastics designer to decide whether I could swim again :) I just did it. The guys at Nike were right when they said "just do it", but as they did not invent that idea to "just doing things", it is not restricted to them either.

(...)

Inspired by amputee sprinters like Aimee Mullins (whose extensive collection of prosthetic legs includes creations by the late designer Alexander McQueen), Swedish industrial design student Richard Stark developed an elegant, water-friendly prosthetic called the Neptune. “I wanted users to be able to choose from a variety of colors, like with shoes,” he says. But to make sure form didn’t drown function, Stark teamed up with a pair of competitive amputee swimmers and their coaches to solve the problems amputees encounter in the pool.

The fin is divided into three “fingers”—a stiff digit in the middle flanked by two pliable ones—which allows wearers to emulate the vaguely circular motion of treading water; swimmers can use the slider to adjust the Neptune’s flexibility to match their strength. And in a modification suggested by one of the amputees, the fin can rotate 90 degrees to switch from the sideways kick of the breaststroke to the up-and-down motion of the crawl.

When Stark finished the project, he published photos and a video online and was surprised at how quickly the Neptune garnered a response. “Amputees all around the world were asking me if they could order it,” he says. Stark is trying to sell the concept as he pursues his master’s degree, but many insurance policies don’t cover a prosthetic that’s strictly for swimming. So Stark will have to simplify his design and get the cost down to something people will be willing to pay out of pocket—hopefully less than $350.

Read More

Do NOT follow this link or you will be banned from the site!
HTML Snippets Powered By : XYZScripts.com
X btK DaKSp
I footnotes
x2