expletive-ethereal
expletive-ethereal
expletive-ethereal
expletive-ethereal

Category: Human Enhancement Bioethics

CE marking or norm in relation to components for prosthetic arms

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - CE marking or norm in relation to components for prosthetic arms; published December 25, 2018, 15:20; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=7749.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1571229365, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - CE marking or norm in relation to components for prosthetic arms}}, month = {December},year = {2018}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=7749}}


CE-marking or norm

The CE-marking establishes that a particular item or product conform to European product law in relation to health, safety, and environmental protection standards [link].

As this text is not public or may be hard to get into the public eye, why not just go ahead and drag it out. I started to be interested by the backgrounds of what our prosthetic limbs and their technical documentation ideally could be already a few years ago [link].  So, a few blog posts here do have a long history, longer than others, and were assembled over quite a period of time.

Read More

BLUE LIGHT SPECIAL: Pitch black cynicism in the Cybathlon 2020: "the role of a disabled person" [not funny]

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - BLUE LIGHT SPECIAL: Pitch black cynicism in the Cybathlon 2020: "the role of a disabled person" [not funny]; published October 25, 2018, 23:02; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=8680.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1571229365, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - BLUE LIGHT SPECIAL: Pitch black cynicism in the Cybathlon 2020: "the role of a disabled person" [not funny]}}, month = {October},year = {2018}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=8680}}


"With that, visitors of the Cybathlon Experience (TM) can test the role of a disabled person" (können in die Rolle einer behinderten Person schlüpfen) (Oral presentation: "CYBATHLON – bewegt Mensch und Technik", 5.15pm–6.00pm, Dr. Roland Sigrist, Cybathlon, ETH Zurich, Raum E 1.2) -- I was there, one among the 8 people that made the audience of this "sold out" Cybathlon talk; amputees are there for "entertainment" (clearly one of the requirements written on a slide in the presentation) (ist es das, was wir als behinderte Personen spielen? eine Rolle, ja?).

After defining a remarkably strange prosthetic arm race, the makers of the Cybathlon 2020 now start to openly bathe us in their pitch-black cynicism.

Why? Pressing question.

Read More

Embodiment of a prosthetic arm [reflections, thoughts, considerations]

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Embodiment of a prosthetic arm [reflections, thoughts, considerations]; published September 16, 2018, 15:42; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=8513.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1571229365, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Embodiment of a prosthetic arm [reflections, thoughts, considerations]}}, month = {September},year = {2018}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=8513}}


So, apparently I had been "identified" as a "super prosthesis user" by a group of researchers. And I was invited to talk about embodiment in context of the "rubber hand illusion" at a user interface or robotic control workshop [link].

So is that what I am: a "user"?

Tsk.

Read More

A Transhumanist Fault Line Around Disability: Morphological Freedom and the Obligation to Enhance [consideration]

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - A Transhumanist Fault Line Around Disability: Morphological Freedom and the Obligation to Enhance [consideration]; published October 8, 2014, 01:48; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=3398.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1571229365, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - A Transhumanist Fault Line Around Disability: Morphological Freedom and the Obligation to Enhance [consideration]}}, month = {October},year = {2014}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=3398}}


Body shapes, or appearance, or morphology, are not free. Not in any everyday sense or pragmatically speaking. Morphology is not free to choose, it is not free in terms of being available, it is not free in that one does not just snap something on and off, and it certainly comes with a set of very tight constraints in any sense conceivable. Let us look at and excerpt and discuss a current discussion [1]. Read More

[1] [doi] H. G. Bradshaw and R. Ter Meulen, "A Transhumanist Fault Line Around Disability: Morphological Freedom and the Obligation to Enhance," Journal of Medicine and Philosophy, vol. 35, iss. 6, pp. 670-684, 2010.
[Bibtex]
@article{Bradshaw01122010,
author = {Bradshaw, Heather G. and Ter Meulen, Ruud}, 
title = {A Transhumanist Fault Line Around Disability: Morphological Freedom and the Obligation to Enhance},
volume = {35}, 
number = {6}, 
pages = {670-684}, 
year = {2010}, 
doi = {10.1093/jmp/jhq048}, 
abstract ={The transhumanist literature encompasses diverse nonnovel positions on questions of disability and obligation reflecting long-running political philosophical debates on freedom and value choice, complicated by the difficulty of projecting values to enhanced beings. These older questions take on a more concrete form given transhumanist uses of biotechnologies. This paper will contrast the views of Hughes and Sandberg on the obligations persons with “disabilities” have to enhance and suggest a new model. The paper will finish by introducing a distinction between the responsibility society has in respect of the presence of impairments and the responsibility society has not to abandon disadvantaged members, concluding that questions of freedom and responsibility have renewed political importance in the context of enhancement technologies.}, 
URL = {http://jmp.oxfordjournals.org/content/35/6/670.abstract}, 
eprint = {http://jmp.oxfordjournals.org/content/35/6/670.full.pdf+html}, 
journal = {Journal of Medicine and Philosophy} 
}

Stump after wearing myoelectric "bionic" prosthesis for 10 hours [graphic #voightkampff]

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Stump after wearing myoelectric "bionic" prosthesis for 10 hours [graphic #voightkampff]; published May 5, 2014, 17:43; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=2979.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1571229365, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Stump after wearing myoelectric "bionic" prosthesis for 10 hours [graphic #voightkampff]}}, month = {May},year = {2014}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=2979}}


2 Comments

Any self respecting medical doctor, orthopedic surgeon, prosthetist, and "bionic" researcher will ask you - in a concerned professional way - "and, do you wear your prosthetic arm often, hopefully even daily?".

We also must accept that wearing "bionic" arms is nowadays assumed to constitute "human enhancement". This obviously is something I will directly and confrontatively label as bitter, ignorant, harsh and degrading cynicism.

If I do wear my prosthetic arm daily, in their view, that makes me a better human or even more human at the same time as I am, in their view, maybe not so much a better human but a "good doggy". Really and in fact, we have a reality split in that - at the same time and at once - my realities are two fold and split:

(1) Outside: On one hand, me trying to wear a prosthetic "super" hand - such as a "bionic" hand - makes my shape outline appear more like the shape outline of other people and so there is this aspect of possibly becoming a better, a deeper human. Conversely, the disfigurement of an arm stump thus makes me less of a human - and that is also what the face of many shee shee froo froo people, many so-called superficial people, will tell me when (or if) I look at them. Clearly, my amputated arm can make other people feel that I am less human. And it clearly does so on any given occasion. This is to a very small part remedied by me wearing this "bionic" apparatus - a machine for symbolism and "hope" far more than a machine for grasping, working, getting stuff done or feeling well.

(2) Inside: On the other hand, wearing a myoelectric arm is a really uncomfortable and skin damaging ordeal that is cumbersome and even in the best of all worlds painful. It feels bad to a degree, where I cannot possibly be totally human any more - as I have to push all normal human reactions such as pain, self respect, worry about the skin on my stump, fear of what all that pain does to me, etc. aside. There is a truly heartfelt authentic element in praising my stubborn wearing of a myoelectric "bionic" arm using the words "good doggy".

So, wearing a "bionic" myoelectric arm on the outside is an act of extreme humane-ness, it approximates the un-disfigured appearance like nothing else. As long as it does not approximate anything, it represents an 80'000 USD promise - and that is extreme in terms of symbolism.

At the very same time, what goes on inside the socket is beyond comprehension to many people - as it is not just not human, but worse, it has truly inhuman aspects. It lowers one, soul wise and as an individuum, in my view.

Here is how my stump looks like after a duration of 10 hours of wearing my iLimb Ultra Revolution at the office, typing and carrying light weight files, possibly holding a cup while rinsing it with water, photographed 1/2 and 7 hours after removing the prosthetic arm. To get the battery to last that long, I had switched the hand off for extended periods of time. Like, when I was typing. Never did my arm look like that after even hard work with the body powered arm such as jobs like hedge cutting [link], scrubbing [link] serious furniture moving [link] and so on. Yesterday I cut the hedges again, got rid of major amounts of stuff and moved a few hundred liters of green waste to the disposal with the body powered arm and really, the skin of my arm is not at all like what we see below - all is smooth and no problem. It is not the prosthesis as such that is a problem generally. It is the difficulty to achieve electrode fit and socket fit at once that really constitutes the "bionic" dilemma here, combined with hard lift and pull forces. Leg amputees can not understand from their own sockets, they experience different problems, not these. If it just was some simple body powered arms, or passive arms, we'd all be cool. Look, I am not saying "eeks, bad". I am saying, why the pansy boy type of immature excitement over what really is still problematic and massively overpriced technology when it comes to "bionic" arms? And here: can you reflect on the deeper meaning of what "bionic" arm wearing may entail?

Read More

Bioethik, Human Enhancement und Behinderung [am Beispiel Unterarmamputation rechts]

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Bioethik, Human Enhancement und Behinderung [am Beispiel Unterarmamputation rechts]; published October 29, 2013, 06:49; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=2152.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1571229365, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Bioethik, Human Enhancement und Behinderung [am Beispiel Unterarmamputation rechts]}}, month = {October},year = {2013}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=2152}}


Die Bioethik, auch in der Schweiz, versucht sich seit geraumer Zeit damit, den Begriffsraum des Enhancement, der "verbesserten Körper", begrifflich zu besiedeln. Gleichzeitig sitzen namhafte Vertreter der Bioethik in verschiedenen Gremien ein, in denen Patienten-relevante Entscheidungen vorbereitet und getroffen werden (Spitäler, Krankenkassen, Swiss Medical Board). Es wird also angestrebt, sich in der aktuellen Realität zu etablieren.

Dabei war es Bioethikern grundsätzlich bislang völlig  egal, was mit den Körpern von Behinderten passiert und gemacht wird - schlicht allein auch deswegen, weil das Terrain von aussen gesehen ja wohl fast völlig unwegsam sein muss und sich dem Zeitgeist jedenfalls nicht von selbst erschliesst. Vielmehr kümmerte man sich in der Bioethik erstmal um Rechte und Pflichten von Patienten und Ärzten allgemein, um Rechte und Pflichten von Forschern und ihren Test-Subjekten, woraus man klinisch-medizinische und forschungsbezogene Richtlinien ableiten wollte; dabei ergaben sich Fragen vor allem bei der Frage nach einer möglichst fairen Zuteilung knapper Behandlungsmöglichkeiten, oder etwa bei der Frage nach dem Umgang mit Retortenbabies. Bislang unbeleuchtet durch Bioethiker blieb sicher auch die Frage danach, was die Voraussetzungen sind, dass ein Armamputierter einem gewagten Forschungsprojekt zu dieser Behinderung überhaupt (aus freien Stücken) einwilligen kann, und inwieweit diese Einwilligung nicht freiwillig sein kann, sondern unter Druck geschieht. Dabei ist es besonders interessant, dass die Bioethik sich in alltagsrelevanten Abwägungen wie Armprothesen gegenüber chirurgischen Massnahmen zur Erreichung minimaler Greiffunktion sehr klar geäussert hat, während die nach meiner Ansicht bedeutend heiklere Frage nach dem Druck von aussen - gerade angesichts aktueller Entwicklungen - komplett unbeachtet bleibt.

Um die Körper sichtbar behinderter Leute kümmerten sich Bioethiker von ihrer begrifflichen Definition her weniger [1]. Soviel ist bestens bekannt. Bioethik wurde ja eben auch grundsätzlich vor allem für die wirklich wichtigen Fragen - also zur Eindämmung der Medizinkosten bei Fragen zu Hirntod,  Organspenden oder  ungeborenen Kindern - auf den Plan gerufen. Dass sie sich jetzt jäh echten und schwierigen, handfesten (!) und mit konkreten Erwartungen besetzten Behindertenthemen ausgesetzt sehen, denen aus ihrer Sache heraus Edelkeit, Ruhm, überhaupt philosophische Eigenschaften abgehen, hat seit längerem die Bioethiker wohl fast so stark entsetzt wie Interessensvertreter von Behinderten [2]. Wer aber hier beginnt, im Garten der Bioethik Behindertenthemen mit umzugraben, wird versehentlich den einen oder anderen Rohrbruch verantworten, denn zum verantwortungsvollen und vor allem sinnvollen und auch fuer Behinderte akzeptable Vorgehensweisen fehlen Wissen, Interesse, Erfahrungen und somit leider auch Respekt.

Denn bei allem Respekt vor dem Fach der Bioethik und deren effektiv tief greifenden, schwierigen Fragen, etwa um Geburten und Sterben - kein Mensch verfasst ethisch-moralische Traktate etwa zur Frage des Ersatzes defekter Auspuffe an Autos. Und hier geht es um ein hartes, alltaegliches Auspuffthema, in das die Bioethiker nun eben hammerhart hineinlaufen, wenn sie nicht aufpassen. Bioethiker sind dabei auch ausserordentlich kalt und rücksichtlos, wenn es darum geht, die Dinge zusammenzuschreiben, dass es ihnen passt, wohl schaffen es Autoren oder Herausgeber auch nicht, die nötige Kritik gegenüber den eigenen Texten aufzubringen; so schreibt etwa Frau Dr. Katrin Grüber [3] "Der Sprinter Oscar Pistorius kämpft seit Jahren darum, bei den regulären Olympischen Spielen mitlaufen zu können. Immer wieder fanden gerichtliche Auseinandersetzungen darüber statt, ob ihn die C-legs (C-Legs: mikroprozessorgesteuerte Beinprothesen der Firma Otto Bock, die nicht nur mechanisch das fehlende Bein ersetzen, sondern bei denen die Bewegung angepasst wird), die er trägt, zu einem unerlaubten Wettbewerbsvorteil im Sinne von Doping verhelfen." Dies ist in mehrerer Hinsicht selbstverständlich völlig falsch, und die Implikationen davon sind relativ wichtig. 1) Pistorius rennt mit Ossurprothesen, niemals mit Otto Bock; 2) Die Dinger sind Carbonfedern, sie leisten eine passive Federleistung, sie enthalten keine Elektronik, keine Kabel und keine Mikropozessoren, denn wer weit schnell rennt will auch wenig Gewicht rumschleppen; 3) Mikroprozessoren sind stromgetrieben; C-Legs benötigen Strom und erbringen im Sinne von Regelkreisen Steuerleistungen; das ist bei Oscar Pistorius' Blades nicht so; 4) C-Legs sind mikroprozessorgesteuerte prothetische Kniegelenke für Above Knee Amputations, aber Pistorius hat seine eigenen Kniegelenke, er ist ein Below The Knee amputee, so dass Pistorius gar kein C-Leg verwenden kann, da es sich dabei um Kniegelenke (nicht um Beine, wie das Suffix "leg" suggeriert) handelt. Weder die Behinderung von Pistorius noch die Prothesen sind in irgendeiner Weise adäquat beschrieben. Es fehlt umfassend am Sachverstand. Man darf hier umfassend kritisch sein.

Neuerdings geht es bei der Frage um "Human Enhancement" innerhalb der Bioethik und medizinischen Sachethik namentlich darum, dass Empfehlungen für Krankenkassen abgegeben werden sollen [4][link], die in der Schweiz nun generell und pauschal dahin zielen, dass "Verbesserungsmassnahmen" an "grundsätzlich gesunden Körpern" definitionsgemäss "keine medizinische Therapie" darstellen und damit nicht kassenpflichtig sind.

Es geht in diesen Texten um die Partikularinteressen einzelner Versicherer: wie machen wir den Beitragszahlern weis, dass sie aufgrund überragender Risikodeckung schöne Beitragssummen zahlen, um gleichzeitig möglichst wenig davon auszuzahlen? Wer das nicht erkennt, versteht das Wesen von Versicherungen nicht. Welche Begriffe - etwa "Human enhancement" - können widerspruchsarm über möglichst viele Lebenssituationen derart übergestülpt werden, dass daraus für die Versicherung ein finanzieller Vorteil erwächst?

Auch scheint ein Problem das Wort "Verbesserung" zu sein. Eine "Verbesserung" ist nach dem allgemeinen Verständnis am gesunden Körper unnötig sind. Diese Bezeichnung lässt ausser acht, dass ich einen "behinderten" gesunden Körper habe, und, dass dieser nicht "verbessert" würde, von "gut" bleiben wir weit weg. Er wird vielmehr etwas "weniger schlecht" gemacht, wobei der effektive Nutzen gesellschaftlich und individuell klar vorhanden ist. Damit kommt die Empfehlung der SAMW diesbezüglich verpeilt, schlecht ausgerichtet, daher.

Das übergeordnete Sozialversicherungsgesetz, sowie jegliche Betroffenenoptik (also etwa die Sichtweise Behinderter), bleiben bei diesem Geschäftsmodell logischerweise beiseite - klar, da einzelne Versicherungen ein Ziel haben, das nicht durchwegs den Interessen der Versicherten oder Gesetzgeber oder auch dem Interesse anderer Versicherungen entsprechen muss. Dies ja offenbar in einem derart hohen Ausmass, dass Verwaltungsgerichtsverfahren zur Klärung von Einsprachen Versicherter gegen Entscheidungen von Versicherungen in der Schweiz gratis sind. Missbrauch ist also offenbar aus Staatssicht zu erwarten. Nur, dass wir hier von einer fairen Verhandlung sehr weit weg sind. Ganz zwangsläufig werden daher Sichtweisen und Lösungsvorschläge resultieren, die nicht unbedingt konform mit dem Sozialversicherungsgesetz sind, die vor allem viel Geld kosten können, und potentiell die Betroffenen dennoch benachteiligen.

Praktisch und tatsächlich ist das auch so, und da bin ich von so einer Art Sichtweise unmittelbar betroffen.

Dies ist aber auch wieder theoretisch interessant, da durch die weder demokratische noch fachlich abgestuetzte Macht, die der Bioethik hier bei der Definition zur Grundlage weitreichender Entscheidungen gegeben oder zugeschrieben wird, ein wiederum messbarer Schaden entsteht bzw. perpetuiert wird, der auf keinerlei vorgesehene Weise mehr behoben werden kann. Auch nicht auf der Ebene des Verständnisses. Der Schaden ist unter anderem finanziell, und er ist ganz erheblich.

Das unmittelbare Ergebnis des Einflusses der Bioethik auf unser Gesundheitswesen ist aber zunächst, dass insbesondere operative (oder medizinische) Verfahren, die dem "Human Enhancement" zugerechnet werden, nicht von Sozialversicherungen bezahlt werden sollen. Gleichzeitig wird empfohlen, Human Enhancement - zu dem ebenfalls passive / kosmetische Armprothesen zu rechnen wären - auszusetzen.

Read More

[1] W. T. Reich, "The word" Bioethics": the struggle over its earliest meanings," Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal, vol. 5, iss. 1, pp. 19-34, 1995.
[Bibtex]
@article{reich1995word,
  title={{The word" Bioethics": the struggle over its earliest meanings}},
  author={Reich, Warren Thomas},
  journal={{Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal}},
  volume={5},
  number={1},
  pages={19--34},
  year={1995},
  publisher={The Johns Hopkins University Press}
}
[2] [doi] M. Kuczewski and K. Kirschner, "Special issue: Bioethics & disability," Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics, vol. 24, iss. 6, pp. 455-458, 2003.
[Bibtex]
@article{kuczewski2003,
year={2003},
issn={1386-7415},
journal={{Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics}},
volume={24},
number={6},
doi={10.1023/B:META.0000006925.05440.1a},
title={{Special issue: Bioethics & disability}},
url={http://dx.doi.org/10.1023/B%3AMETA.0000006925.05440.1a},
publisher={Kluwer Academic Publishers},
author={Kuczewski, Mark and Kirschner, Kristi},
pages={455-458},
language={English}
}
[3] M. Eilers, K. Grüber, and C. Rehmann-Sutter, Verbesserte Körper - gutes Leben?: Bioethik, Enhancement und die Disability Studies, Lang, 2012.
[Bibtex]
@book{miriam2012verbesserte,
  title={Verbesserte K{\"o}rper - gutes Leben?: Bioethik, Enhancement und die Disability Studies},
  author={Miriam Eilers and Gr{\"u}ber, K. and Rehmann-Sutter, C.},
  isbn={9783631630655},
  lccn={2013388648},
  series={Praktische Philosophie kontrovers},
  url={http://books.google.ch/books?id=MOOwMQEACAAJ},
  year={2012},
  publisher={Lang}
}
[4] N. Biller-Andorno, Medizin für Gesunde? Analysen und Empfehlungen zum Umgang mit Human Enhancement Bericht der Arbeitsgruppe «Human Enhancement» im Auftrag der Akademien der Wissenschaften Schweiz
[Bibtex]
@book{samw2012humanenhancement,
  title={{Medizin für Gesunde? Analysen und Empfehlungen zum Umgang mit Human Enhancement Bericht der Arbeitsgruppe «Human Enhancement» im Auftrag der Akademien der Wissenschaften Schweiz}},
  author={Biller-Andorno, Nikola},
  isbn={978-3-905870-29-9},
  url=http://www.samw.ch/de/Ethik/Human-Enhancement.html}
Do NOT follow this link or you will be banned from the site!
HTML Snippets Powered By : XYZScripts.com
DFHg FEjZp YP bW
I footnotes
x2