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Category: Bimanual task benchmark

Subaru dashboard modifications [how it is that we ("we") are?]

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Subaru dashboard modifications [how it is that we ("we") are?]; published October 3, 2019, 17:23; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=10198.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1573560460, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Subaru dashboard modifications [how it is that we ("we") are?]}}, month = {October},year = {2019}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=10198}}


Sometimes, being an arm amputee is just not what other people think it is.  Fucking isn't, really, anyway, but this is such a shining example. A long time ago, I started having a large roll of red sheet rubber at home, an industry size thing. And double sided sticky tape. And stuff like that. Like, an arm amputee whould need that type of stuff. How come "we" - "the" arm amputees - have materials such as that at home? If they do excavations in, say, 50 years, they may find thes things and go "WTF did that guy do with that".

And it remains a valid question for scholars that study us ("us"): you may read all the works of any official apointee about what one has to consider in terms of prostheses - but you will never find any word about sheet rubber and sticky tape as stuff to keep, alongside WD40.

To the best of my knowledge, therefore, you read that here first, too.

So here we go: Subaru dashboard modifications for the benefit of an arm amputee.

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Subaru Weathertech floormat mount [what it is that we ("we") do]

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Subaru Weathertech floormat mount [what it is that we ("we") do]; published October 3, 2019, 16:44; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=10207.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1573560460, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Subaru Weathertech floormat mount [what it is that we ("we") do]}}, month = {October},year = {2019}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=10207}}


This is a bit of Extreme Cyborging microworks: how to make a car floor mat stay in place with sturdy, cheap materials?

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Fixing espresso machine: swap pump of Rancilio Silvia [Extreme Cyborging]

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Fixing espresso machine: swap pump of Rancilio Silvia [Extreme Cyborging]; published August 24, 2019, 08:57; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=10055.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1573560460, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Fixing espresso machine: swap pump of Rancilio Silvia [Extreme Cyborging]}}, month = {August},year = {2019}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=10055}}


While our contemporary circus directors keep fighting with true elephants (Catch-22s: should one hammer with an iLimb? [link] - should one exhibit defect iLimb gloves under use in public? [link]), I used true and established technology [TRS Jaws - link] and fixed my coffee machine by replacing its pump.

While a new coffee machine (the same model but new) would cost me around 800 USD and while a repair by a company or specialist would cost me maybe around 400 USD, the replacement pump that I got via eBay from Bulgaria was 34,90 USD, with shipping 13 USD. Furthermore, the new pump was better - a more solid build, quieter. In addition, I did not have to suffer absence of the machine for more than about half an hour.

So while I do understand why people prefer to chose their prosthetic hand devices for their suitability for posing with them [link], I would propose to anyone that there might be a possibly more meaningful life beyond that.

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TRS Jaws [new product - first use report]

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - TRS Jaws [new product - first use report]; published August 10, 2019, 10:51; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=9769.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1573560460, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - TRS Jaws [new product - first use report]}}, month = {August},year = {2019}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=9769}}


3 Comments

The TRS Jaws is a voluntary opening gripper where you can set the grip strength by a lever. The grip then varies between very light, maybe under 1 kg or so, to somewhere above 5 kg. This is a first real use report, after I used it permanently since roughly around May 21, 2019, give or take a few hours.

There are just a few points to address at this stage. If you wear a body powered arm for real work [link], you may now buy one.

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Soldering cable connection and heat shrinking tube over connection (Extreme Cyborging Microworks)

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Soldering cable connection and heat shrinking tube over connection (Extreme Cyborging Microworks); published April 4, 2019, 06:59; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=9463.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1573560460, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Soldering cable connection and heat shrinking tube over connection (Extreme Cyborging Microworks)}}, month = {April},year = {2019}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=9463}}


A full understanding what amputees do or do not in their real life has so far escaped the acumen of research and development. This explains how > 85% of us still run free, without the real restriction of having to pay massive money for technology that basically makes life more difficult.

A notable exception is my body powered split hook. As we can show how academics comprehensively fail to grasp (haha) the scope and use of prosthetic arm use, even a modest achievement such as this appears quite noteworthy and definitely reportable. After all, absolutely no (0) achievement was delivered by any R&D in the domain of myoelectric arms to this day that has made it to actual everyday use and hard work delivery, both since Cybathlon 2016 (that promised it would "push" development) and generally since >40 years of "research" into myoelectric arm control. As they all have more than a lot to learn (not advancing problematically high error rates in >40 years is a catastrophe or wouldn't you say), we are called upon to focus on the basic.

Today, how to attach the cable of a power supply to a pump.

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Angular constraints of prosthetic grippers and functional success correlation [technical evaluation]

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Angular constraints of prosthetic grippers and functional success correlation [technical evaluation]; published February 11, 2019, 04:55; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=9322.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1573560460, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Angular constraints of prosthetic grippers and functional success correlation [technical evaluation]}}, month = {February},year = {2019}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=9322}}


I had evaluated, subjectively, the grip performance of various prosthetic options that I have. These have been already analysed in the context of grip taxonomy, where so far, research has largely focused on grip geometry as such, using some idiosyncratic logic that I found not too relevant.

Using a more relevant logic, I approached the question of grip mechanic from a different angle, both verbally and proverbially speaking: from a user angle, both actually geometrically and subjectively speaking.

I realized that most of my frequently used grips and grip situations fall into a far more narrow range of angle distributions than I had ever assumed.

While others keep rambling about compensatory motion [1] where they assume the "cause" to reside inside some extra joint or so, I know, from exposure and from intelligent looking (all that is needed, boys1) that the orientation of the grip angle and shape in relation to the fixed gripper geometry - including wrist rotation - has to work in conjunction with the average orientation of objects in everyday life, work, tasks and jobs. Not everyone understands adaptive or adaptable grip really well2  when really, modern "bionic" prosthetic hands have an electrically controlled adaptive grip that, by definition of "adaptive" (and not: "adaptable" [1]), closes fingers around any irregularly shaped object - just like, since maybe 1938, the Becker Mechanical hand does. So there is nothing new at all with regard to that. With regard to device-angle constraints, adaptive grip options do not change that really. The typical "tests" (ULPOM, SHAP, etc.[1]) do not produce output that forces the examiner onto the answer of "there, angles, you... you" so one is thrown unto oneself yet again, so to speak, in order to shed light into this aspect.

So I sat down to add "typical object angles" to my already present grip success statistics over a list of my most frequently or typically used grips. Then I did that in theory and then I figured, why not go and video some.

Thereby, a prosthetic hook as gripper device appears to be a lot more advanced, design wise, geometrically, in reducing device materials, bulk and design to approximate a really good overall use performance - also with regard to angular constraints - than the iLimb (which I have here also for as much testing as I like) and with that, many current commercial (or other) multi articulated hands.

In fact, prosthetic hands appear to be by far the older (and thus possibly less reflected) geometric design idea of a prosthetic arm's terminal device than the definitely more modern split hook. I may also go history hunting, but the claim that a split hook is old or outdated, and that therefore by inference a prosthetic hand is automatically new or more modern, as an idea, is wrong, particularly technically speaking. But also historically, to replace a hand with a hand is a straightforward design idea, that does not take any particular imagination, thus it is reportedly old, very old indeed, not new, like some uninformed people try to promote. Conversely, split hooks are so transformative and groundbreakingly new that not even the self-proclaimed transhumanists have understood, or adopted this concept. In a way, a split-hook efficiently unmasks a number of wrong beliefs - just look at their faces, listen to a few sentences of these mouths, and you know more about them than they ever wanted to admit.

The far more elegant reduction, also of angles and controls, to fit into the limited action and option constraints of an arm amputee, is certainly that of a body-powered split hook. It boils down the prosthetic needs to a successful sleek elegant reduction of a functional minimum, making it the ideal choice for anyone that wants a maximum of performance from a minimum of failure, cost, decay, bulk, futile grip attempts and total overhead. The subtle distinction is that a "body-powered split hook" is an entirely different beast than a passive hook, obviously, which probably no one ever noticed, particularly not the people that assumed that a body-powered split hook is best portrayed by installing a "Captain Hook" metaphor.

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[1] P. J. Kyberd, "Assessment of functionality of multifunction prosthetic hands," JPO: Journal of Prosthetics and Orthotics, vol. 29, iss. 3, pp. 103-111, 2017.
[Bibtex]
@article{kyberd2017assessment,
  title={Assessment of functionality of multifunction prosthetic hands},
  author={Kyberd, Peter J},
  journal={JPO: Journal of Prosthetics and Orthotics},
  volume={29},
  number={3},
  pages={103--111},
  year={2017},
  publisher={LWW}
}

Real work - Real Men Don't Eat Quiche - Real Programmers Don't Use PASCAL [reference to popular culture]

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Real work - Real Men Don't Eat Quiche - Real Programmers Don't Use PASCAL [reference to popular culture]; published December 6, 2018, 08:37; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=8850.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1573560460, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Real work - Real Men Don't Eat Quiche - Real Programmers Don't Use PASCAL [reference to popular culture]}}, month = {December},year = {2018}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=8850}}


When I mention real work as opposed to work one does in the role of a pansy boy, I certainly mean this both seriously and tongue in cheek.

Only if you spend your days with real work will you ever understand. You will be dripping wet from sweating. Your clothes will be so entirely smelly from external causes. Your materials will be in dire need for cleaning ever so comprehensively. You have worked for many hours. And you will go back to do it all over again. A prosthetic arm that is built to last 3 years dies within 5 seconds, 15 minutes, or 2 months - using stock commercial parts, it burns and dies like paper consumed by a slow fire, component by component.

Welcome to the world of real work.

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How to apply wood screws in series - demonstration, difficulties [bench work]

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - How to apply wood screws in series - demonstration, difficulties [bench work]; published October 26, 2018, 14:52; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=8717.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1573560460, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - How to apply wood screws in series - demonstration, difficulties [bench work]}}, month = {October},year = {2018}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=8717}}


I happily cut and mounted two wooden boards into a pre-existing shelf frame. For that, a series of wood screws were put into place.

If you are interested in mount, assembly, and screws, read these earlier posts, too:

Dismantling, loading, transporting, unloading and reassembling shelf [bimanual, activity] {illustration, a peek into the life of a person with a handicap}

 

Drill a screw [1-handed way]

The ultimate bimanual task - the IKEA Pax wardrobe system with gliding doors [tricks,tips and yeehaw]

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Understanding and informing design issues of a prosthetic arm for below elbow amputation by way of "taxonomy" [literature review, reality check]

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Understanding and informing design issues of a prosthetic arm for below elbow amputation by way of "taxonomy" [literature review, reality check]; published July 26, 2018, 21:18; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=7651.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1573560460, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Understanding and informing design issues of a prosthetic arm for below elbow amputation by way of "taxonomy" [literature review, reality check]}}, month = {July},year = {2018}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=7651}}


The academic and industrial attempts to approach prosthetic arms so far have been met with less success than the providers must have hoped for. Far less, in fact so little that we wonder what is going on.

Possibly, design issues are the key to this as however vaguely put, some analytic approach needs to inform better design - but how to really inform better design from issues based on analysis? What is a suitable analysis? If we cannot see any better designs anywhere in practice, real life, then what is the analysis worth? Can we analyze analyses to get a better understanding of what might be going on there?

We might best start with what we know to be true.

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Case-study of a user-driven prosthetic arm design: bionic hand versus customized body-powered technology in a highly demanding work environment [article out]

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Case-study of a user-driven prosthetic arm design: bionic hand versus customized body-powered technology in a highly demanding work environment [article out]; published January 4, 2018, 14:29; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=8066.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1573560460, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Case-study of a user-driven prosthetic arm design: bionic hand versus customized body-powered technology in a highly demanding work environment [article out]}}, month = {January},year = {2018}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=8066}}


 


This is a blog post of one of the rare focused and well based scientific journal articles that really explains how real work, body powered and myoelectric arms relate and go together for a unilateral right below elbow amputee in a physically demanding work environment.

The prior presentation of this paper [poster at Cybathlon symposium 2016], which had been more pragmatically worded (with me thinking people would know anyway), this was now written up as article and published. During that process, the reviewers clearly made great points of all kinds of aspects I never knew were not sky clear to everyone.

So maybe, writing a ~ 30 page case study with > 210 references does clarify stuff, at least potentially and for those that actually read it. But possibly, it still requires attention to even just read it.

Knowledge does not come easy, Highlander! (Nakano, in: Highlander III The Final Dimension)

 

If you are more interested in visionary posts, read about the gadget features of the prosthetic arm in Kingsmen: The Golden Circle [link]. And technically, myoelectric control did have it coming. That technology remained uncool for four decades [link].

Publication [link]

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TRS Prehensor [grip surface tweaking II]

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - TRS Prehensor [grip surface tweaking II]; published May 25, 2017, 13:43; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=7381.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1573560460, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - TRS Prehensor [grip surface tweaking II]}}, month = {May},year = {2017}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=7381}}


The TRS Adult Grip Prehensor is a bit like an American car. You may want to tune it, even try to tune it well, before you cant take it out  to really shine. Not literally "shine", though. Proverbially! Really I do not need this here to actually shine. It is totally OK if it just makes me look less bad, like, by supporting me, grip wise.

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Fotoserie - Herstellung und Aufbereitung einer Serie von Passteilen für PMCTA-Sets [photos]

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Fotoserie - Herstellung und Aufbereitung einer Serie von Passteilen für PMCTA-Sets [photos]; published April 4, 2017, 15:55; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=7322.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1573560460, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Fotoserie - Herstellung und Aufbereitung einer Serie von Passteilen für PMCTA-Sets [photos]}}, month = {April},year = {2017}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=7322}}


Herstellung von 3D gedrucktem PMCTA Equipment. Alle Teile wurden von mir selbst entworfen und gedruckt. TRS Prehensor im Einsatz.

Fotoserie für die Einreichung zum bgw-Wettbewerb.

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Myoelectric arm dialog

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Myoelectric arm dialog; published February 10, 2017, 13:01; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=8492.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1573560460, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Myoelectric arm dialog}}, month = {February},year = {2017}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=8492}}


On the user discussion portals, things are often interesting and relevant as they are based on actual experiences. One question once was: "Is anyone able to tell me whether it is normal that my "bionic" hand breaks so many times within such a short amount of time? Do others have that problem as well?" - All text rewritten and paraphrased for anonymous quotation.

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