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Category: Self help

Hosmer Model 6 Work Hook [tweak / improvement / backlock feature]

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Hosmer Model 6 Work Hook [tweak / improvement / backlock feature]; published June 2, 2016, 11:47; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=6102.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1574228471, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Hosmer Model 6 Work Hook [tweak / improvement / backlock feature]}}, month = {June},year = {2016}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=6102}}


The Hosmer Model 6 Work Hook is by far the most robust, powerful and useful commercially available terminal device for real work, besides the Toughware PRX V2P Prehensor and the Toughware PRX Retro. This Hosmer device is particularly useful due to the backlock feature that allows the user to reliably hold also relatively heavy machines for an extended period of time (such as hedge cutters).

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Artistic approach to identity [Glenn Lignon]

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Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Artistic approach to identity [Glenn Lignon]; published March 24, 2012, 23:36; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=539.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1574228471, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Artistic approach to identity [Glenn Lignon]}}, month = {March},year = {2012}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=539}}


There are a variety of amputees-turned-empowered these days. I mean, great if the public supports that but really, there is not as much heroism as there is stubbornness and patience required to stick it out.

Personally that is not the type of attitude I have. I don't feel this disability empowers me. Life does, generally, always did and always will empower me - but not this shit. Don't get me wrong here. I was always empowered and I always had stuff going on. Sports and activities are not new to me, I always liked them. But I find that the loss of a hand is a nuisance, a negative vector as such, and not more to say about it. Yeah, one gets used to dealing with it, to the point where one can attempt to reduce the negative effects a bit. But getting used to it still doesn't take away some worrying aspects. And dealing with them is something I find relevant and important.

Based on the report by Georg Bakalim about the deaths of 4738 Finnish war amputees [PDF], suicide rates can be calculated based on the numbers of deaths given, for each amputee subgroup. Suicides are 20% of the deaths in the below elbow amputee group (14/69), whereas suicides represent less than 10% in the other groups. More concisely they are 8% (below knee, 26/323), 7% (above knee, 13/196) and 5% (above elbow, 5/99), respectively.

And so, maybe hanging in there is indeed about survival after all.

Below the elbow amputation is distinct from other amputations as issues that arise are very peculiar. They are not the same as other amputees. There are overlaps but differences are massive. At least I will say it feels that way.

Indeed, after I had lost my hand some people thought I was going to kill myself. I wasn't going to do that though. Over the years and from the many reactions of other people I must say that depressive episodes, depression and suicide risk are real issues. And so from everyday experience these suicide rate figures (see above) make sense to me. They are plausible.

Now, it is a fact that missing an arm below the elbow amounts to a real tangible disfigurement, similar to a facial disfigurement. And it is a real fact that no prosthetic arm fixes that - if anything, a prosthetic temporarily might relieve some symptoms. But for real life issues, a prosthetic will not achieve a lot. I can choose to be a guy with a disfigurement, or, a guy with a disfigurement and a plastic to cover it. - So with a below elbow amputation, you will feel similar to a person with a disfigured face. Not the same, obviously - but similar. That particular disability, visually, resides deep down in the U of the uncanny valley.

We are - in terms of social identity - what we look like, and so that is what one has to deal with.

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Shift in activities *versus* Back to previous activities [rant]

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Shift in activities *versus* Back to previous activities [rant]; published October 28, 2011, 23:57; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=498.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1574228471, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Shift in activities *versus* Back to previous activities [rant]}}, month = {October},year = {2011}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=498}}


People measure success of an amputee. They do. According to their own standard, as high or low as these just may be.

So they go and ask, "So, you are back to normal?" "Are you over it?" or "Have you overcome the disability?".

It is like their Golden Standard centers around the age of 24 to 30, and around the stuff one does when one is 24 to 30. I don't think it's a disability thing. It's a question of staying rooted in the Golden Standard Golden Age assumption. It is a late failure to evolve, in a way.

So I do get asked, "So, you'se back to normel?" (as they do ask using slang language).

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Mini Cooper - power steering, garage attitude and my own repair [how to]

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Mini Cooper - power steering, garage attitude and my own repair [how to]; published July 18, 2011, 00:22; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=458.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1574228471, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Mini Cooper - power steering, garage attitude and my own repair [how to]}}, month = {July},year = {2011}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=458}}


After a serious winter with lots of driving, I was not too surprised to see my power steering fail on a day where I was about to take the car to the well established Titan Garage Zuerich (Badenerstrasse 527, Zuerich) anyway. There were a number of occassions where the car was caught in heavy snow or sliding on icy roads as unavoidable consequence of winter travel, and as cautious as one may drive, one wonders how the car holds up. Turns out it doesn't.

A Mini Cooper with a failing power steering is serious business. With two hands, this thing is impossible to steer then. With one hand, no freaking way. So I tweaked my way back into getting that power steering back up luckily - and asked the dispatch person to also check what was wrong there, and if possible, to please fix it.

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Stigmatization and demonization IV - stares, upfront questions

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Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Stigmatization and demonization IV - stares, upfront questions; published April 26, 2010, 06:30; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=302.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1574228471, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Stigmatization and demonization IV - stares, upfront questions}}, month = {April},year = {2010}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=302}}


1 Comment

Auch das von unbeherrschter Neugier geleitete Ansprechen behinderter Personen, verbunden mit taktlosen Fragen, gehört zu den Stigmaerfahrungen der Betroffenen, wenngleich es nicht ganz so verletzend sein dürfte wie Anstarren, da ja immerhin eine Kommunikationschance eröffnet wird. Die oben erwähnte Diskriminierung der Privatsphäre des Behinderten und seine Degradierung zum Objekt kennzeichnen auch diese Reaktionsform Nichtbehinderter. [Cloerkes]

Obviously, one gets at times viewed as some type of person that is interested in immediate blunt questions or approaches. Visible disability does that.

People that ask such questions typically do that because they look at me or my arm more like an object than part of a person. That in itself also is regarded as discrimination. I am not opposed to a talk, a discussion, to any type of subject - but such blunt upfront choices of first subject are something that may elicit strange answers.

The really practical question is what to answer or how to react. Mostly, it is situation dependent. I am not really often in the mood to fill in complete strangers about stuff that is none of their business.

Also, if I get treated more like a curious object by you (including staring or upfront questions without any introduction), what makes you think you deserve to be treated any differently? See, I knew I could get your attention somehow :)

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Merry Christmas 2009

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Merry Christmas 2009; published December 22, 2009, 20:21; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=248.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1574228471, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Merry Christmas 2009}}, month = {December},year = {2009}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=248}}


Merry Christmas 2009! Also a good time to get laundry done. Or to do sports. Or to relax and not do much. Or to work.

Cheers to Super Bock. 2009 was a funny year. Two serious Otto Bock clients told me - and they were dead serious - they would buy just anything but Otto Bock products again. Obviously their customer service must have really pissed them off. Don't look at me - it wasn't me. I know exactly how it feels when dealing with Otto Bock customer service: it's definitely not always nice. But I have no problem buying Otto Bock again. Or any other brand. If they have a good product? Any time. Where were we? Ah, cheers. To Super Bock.

Categories: Self help Support

Creating a 2D textile cut pattern to match a specific 3D shape such as a prosthetic socket or hand

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Creating a 2D textile cut pattern to match a specific 3D shape such as a prosthetic socket or hand; published September 29, 2009, 11:44; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=224.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1574228471, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Creating a 2D textile cut pattern to match a specific 3D shape such as a prosthetic socket or hand}}, month = {September},year = {2009}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=224}}


If you have a prosthetic socket that requires a perfectly fitting sleeve, or a prosthetic hand that requires a perfectly fitting glove - or if you have some other 3D shape you need to convert into a suitable 2D textile cut pattern: here is how to create a sewing pattern from your specific 3D shapes.

I will look at textiles, textures and patterns separately. This only addresses how to cut 'em up.

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Parking for upper extremity amputees - Shops and employee staring - Region of Zuerich - North East

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Parking for upper extremity amputees - Shops and employee staring - Region of Zuerich - North East; published September 4, 2009, 23:26; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=222.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1574228471, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Parking for upper extremity amputees - Shops and employee staring - Region of Zuerich - North East}}, month = {September},year = {2009}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=222}}


There are some facts about parking and shopping:

  • I do not shop a lot of stuff once a week. Also, I shop daily and I shop small amounts. That allows me to keep overuse of my heavily strained left arm to a minimum.This means frequent runs to the store.  I park close to the entrance. Actually, I park very close to the entrance. My ability to carry bags far and my ability to push a heavy shopping cart straight over asphalt or paved parking lots is limited. And truth is, I do have a choice.
  • My left "non disabled" arm contains damage to wrist and hand after about four or more serious falls, sports injuries and the likes, so it is unstable and chronically painful. So I buy small amounts and carry these using a suitable bag.
  • Do I have any interest to pay a parking fee? No. Free parking rules.
  • I have a problem loading my bags into my car sometimes, having to open the passenger door wide. That requires wide parking spots. Typically, disability parking is better suited, it is narrow on normal parking spots. I always managed to get my bags into my car - don't ask. Better to be safe than sorry.
  • I do not get any official 'disability parking' allowance. Our laws do not provide for that as upper extremity amputation is not recognized, simple as that. Doesn't mean I have no options though now, does it!
  • This restricts my shopping to two classes of shops (a) shops that have ample free parking available, (b) shops that allow me an explicit exception to use their disability parking.
  • I did write to all of our shops in the area to ask how they see the situation. Of all, only COOP answered politely saying they allow me to use their disability parking despite not having an official 'disability parking' vignette (Swiss traffic law restricts these to people that can't walk well).

So, Glatt Zentrum, COOP Dietlikon and gas station shops are definitely winners! That is where I feel my requirements are met best. Thanks, guys. After that, online shopping is next. Why carry anything if they can have it transported here.

IKEA, JUMBO, Migros, Media Markt and others lose. Parking is elusive, costly, narrow, scarce, uninteresting. Also I did not like the stares in some of these shops, also by employees, so maybe some of these shops just by nature are a bit against disability. Shops without parking don't even come into consideration. I am not strict or exclusive in where I pick up my stuff but obviously, friendship is a natural process.

Employee / shop clerk staring that stands out as particularly unpleasant

Employees in the Walder Schuhgeschäft in Glattzentrum actually will stand at a safe 5 meter distance, all turned towards me, and give me a full stare as I struggle to tie shoe laces. More than once, their company is extremely tense and uneasy. These folks are highly recommended for investigative journalists - that is, if you go there with a disabled decoy to shoot some undercover camera, or as actors for a Paradrom Rathausen experience.

Employees in IKEA Dietlikon also stopped and stared. If a customer with disability scans and packs his stuff, it is considered good practice to stand at a safe distance and spend a few minutes with wide open eyes staring.

Best shops to use

Electronics and tools are best ordered through digitec.ch or toppreise.ch.

Furniture, carpets or frames, fabric, bikes, hifi equipment, watches, nails or screws are definitely best ordered through eBay.ch or ricardo.ch. Clothes are best and cheapest ordered through llbean.com and from jcpenney.com. Shoes are best ordered from rmwilliams.com.au.

Besides, why fight it! I am now free of problematic overuse symptoms that I had last year and daily jerking around of heavy stuff played a major role in these - and I am determined to keep it that way.

A gerneral solution to such accessibility issues would mainly increase other shops' chances to sell stuff so maybe it'd be in their interest. But then who knows. And who cares.

keywords - disability parking in bruettisellen wallisellen dietlikon glattzentrum behindertenparkplaetze behindert behinderung parken parkplaetze amputation vorderarm starren anstarren anglotzen behindertenfreundlich disability friendly

Vicarious embarrassment - Fremdschämen

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Vicarious embarrassment - Fremdschämen; published July 16, 2009, 23:50; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=204.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1574228471, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Vicarious embarrassment - Fremdschämen}}, month = {July},year = {2009}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=204}}


Vicarious embarrassment is part of what non-disabled people may feel stressed out about when meeting a disabled person. They are not embarrassed that much about themselves as they seem to be in a more related, social way.

Expectations of a non-disabled person towards the disabled person may not be met - the disabled person may not be pretty, drop a knife, laugh too loud, be self assured, show their handicap openly, not show their handicap as they are embarrassed themselves, and so on. And as these expectations are not met, embarrassment sets in.

Obviously, some things are not working or possible for that disabled person as they should be in the expectation of the average human, hence "dis-ability"! It is pretty obvious. But then, social issues seem to go further than that. So we get to the complicated but relevant issue of vicarious embarrassment.

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Artistic visions for prosthetic design VI - Why on earth RED? What happens when you wear a RED ARM?

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Artistic visions for prosthetic design VI - Why on earth RED? What happens when you wear a RED ARM?; published June 22, 2009, 01:45; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=183.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1574228471, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Artistic visions for prosthetic design VI - Why on earth RED? What happens when you wear a RED ARM?}}, month = {June},year = {2009}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=183}}


3 Comments

Red is the color we are talking about. Red is not a new color for wearing stuff though.

After trying my "cosmetic looking" prosthesis - both the cosmetic arm and the very realistic silicone covered hand - at work and at play, at parties and when meeting people, they all felt very comfortable to wear and put me in a good mood. But comfort was only what I got - the others got a different ride out of it.

Actually, my initial reaction to the skin colored hand as well as the first hook that I saw was that of nausea. When I first saw the options for prosthetic arms I felt like going to the toilet and puking maybe for two or three weeks or so. But I didn't. And instead of the void, the nothing, I do like that bit of ugly ass plastic there, at least I liked it better than non-disabled folks. They often react like I reacted for the first time.

I am not alone to be appalled by how prosthetic limbs look. Typical reactions of amputees when seeing artificial limbs for the first time are similar (cited from [1]):

I don't think I realized, but I thought I was getting my leg back and when I saw the prosthesis for the first time, I cried and cried. And I look back on that day and not the day of the accident but that day as the worst day of my life and I cried and cried and cried...

I remember the first day h put the limb on and I remember the emotion was to start crying. It just wasn't the same. That was your immediate reaction to it you know. Subconsciously you are thinking that you are going to be put back together.

Authors' further comments, also from [1]:

Thus, a common response to seeing a prosthesis for the first time was of extreme shock and disappointment. Furthermore, it was also generally agreed that it was an emotionally charged experience and that living with an amputation did not simply involve getting a prosthesis made and returning to a relatively unchanged life.

My prosthetic technician's officially defined attempts - so far - at camouflage and emulating a normal hand/arm did not at all manage to communicate 'ease', 'beauty', 'comfort' or 'relaxed attitude' to other people. Of course not. People cannot see that I like the way the snug fit of the liner compresses my stump and they cannot see that my brain even believes there is still a hand and that things feel not at all what they look like from outside. Alright, it's called 'phantom' hand for a reason. Yet, all that has no bearing and how and what I feel is not what plays out at the other end.

Signaling 'ease', 'beauty', 'comfort' or 'relaxed attitude' in relation to the disabled arm could even be wrong for any prosthesis to attempt. Non-disabled people by nature and by all we know will be nervous or irritated. So if the people you encounter are at all to be given a chance to chill, to go "phew", trying to communicate 'ease', 'beauty', 'comfort', 'chill' or even 'humor' could go down the wrong way.

Conversely, wearing a standard issue cosmetic looking hand, I will likely be understood as communicating 'this has been taken over by specialist replacement, it is a taboo zone and ought not to be talked about'. It may communicate in our society also 'we are all tense and hope you accept the prosthesis as suitable attempt for perfection, please look away'. That seems to cause conflicting emotions and appears to be a rather solid basis for relatively stressful further encounters.

So the issue is complicated, but bear with me here.

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"Prosthetic culture": prosthetic solutions by non disabled people versus prosthetic solutions by amputees [upper extremity]

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - "Prosthetic culture": prosthetic solutions by non disabled people versus prosthetic solutions by amputees [upper extremity]; published June 21, 2009, 01:49; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=181.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1574228471, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - "Prosthetic culture": prosthetic solutions by non disabled people versus prosthetic solutions by amputees [upper extremity]}}, month = {June},year = {2009}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=181}}


"Rehabilitation professionals define the problems, the agenda, and the social reality of disabled persons in ways that serve their own interests more closely than those of their clients" (Joseph Stubbins, "The politics of disability" --- In "Attitudes Towards Persons With Disabilities". Edited by Harold E. Yuker. New York: Springer, 1988. pp 22-32)

It appears as if we may want to look at some ad hominem observations. After all, there are not so many people that work towards upper extremity prosthetics and that achieve success with their attempts. Let's have a go at it, shall we.

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Artistic visions for prosthetic design IV - wooden design model hand

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Artistic visions for prosthetic design IV - wooden design model hand; published June 20, 2009, 17:59; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=180.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1574228471, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Artistic visions for prosthetic design IV - wooden design model hand}}, month = {June},year = {2009}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=180}}


This is part of my Red Hand Series.

We all agree that cool options for a prosthetic hand do not have to necessarily be hugely expensive. Myoelectric options are not an option right now and at this moment, as I am not a glutton for painishment.

So I got a wooden hand with adjustable fingers. I banged it up so it'd fit on my wrist and here is how that looks. I can use that to try to look cool and for typing (that is noteworthy as that is just about what other people use ridiculously expensive prostheses such as the iLimb for).

By no way is this meant as a way to put down iLimb users but for a total cost of 78'000 CHF out of my own pocket (see how much is that in dollars!) I rightfully expect the combined performance of a luxury car with all the electronics, and a high end power tool, and a high end computer workstation - all in one. And for the iLimb I see more like a total cost of five small electric motors, a number of cast plastic pieces and some screws. And if they sold them for 5'000 CHF I'd have gotten one on my own right now.

These wooden hands here, however, sell for 25 CHF (some 1/3120th of the iLimb cost) and so may I introduce the term adequacy. I can and plan to use these as experimental substrates. There is no expected performance. I may wreck some material during tinkering and trying.

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Airport nightmares II - Berlin Tegel - check-in for disabled people

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Airport nightmares II - Berlin Tegel - check-in for disabled people; published June 1, 2009, 13:58; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=177.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1574228471, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Airport nightmares II - Berlin Tegel - check-in for disabled people}}, month = {June},year = {2009}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=177}}


4 Comments

I do not actively collect travel experiences. They just happen. So please allow me to refer to 'airport Berlin Tegel' as 'Errorport Berlin Tegel' or in German 'Fluchhafen Berlin Tegel' (curse port).

On May 31st 2009 we tried to board AB8198 Air Berlin from Errorport Berlin Tegel (BERLIN/TXL) to Zürich (ZURICH). We then faced gate A01 where the security check is set up almost fully transparently so waiting passengers are visibly and audibly well entertained by watching disabled people struggle through the security ordeal.

The experience was indeed a very German one, however somewhat historical, when one is shown to the public as disabled person and when the public decides to stand and stare. Empathy in these moments is entirely absent in both security and gawkers (that is, passengers), and if the following lines miss empathy too, please regard this as a sharp retribution, as revenge, as a tit-for-tat which some of you probably owe me.

Now, Germany is not just paradise - no! Germany is the country where racial discrimination is an ubiquitous experience in that all of Germany was declared a "No Go Zone" by some extremists. And disabled people still go through undiluted hell - daily - according to a recent well argued article. So staring and discrimination are what Germans are really good at. Conversely a disabled person is good as long as they make up for it by, say, training for the Paralympics. Still, this looks like they made great progress compared to just some decades ago, so maybe we should be grateful.

Germans are the European Champions in classifying people. They systematically deny disabled people a decent and human treatment they so very much claim for themselves and so disabled people are classified lower than ordinary people. Even though their constitution is alleged to state "nobody is to be disadvantaged due to disability" since 1994, we are painfully reminded that that is only 15 years now (2009).

You should also realize that the German mindset, the cultural make, the way these people think, make them file these air traffic rules against (would you argue using the word "for" here, yes?)  disabled people not under the section "people" - no, the rules against disabled people are listed not just even under "goods", but under "hazardous goods" - German term being "Gefahrgut".

Gefahrgut. That is the category disabled people are dealt with in air traffic. Let this sink in. Germany, 2009.

Regulations for making sure that a fast recovery of disabled people is impeded as much as possible due to the apparent fact that lives of non-disabled people are worth more (JAR-OPS 1.260 Carriage of Persons with Reduced Mobility):

http://www.regelwerk-online.de/recht/gefahr.gut/flug/ops_ges.htm

So we are "Gefahrgut" in the German minds, these minds that are so adept at classifying, discerning and discriminating.

The times of assuming naivety are long gone though. Germans stare and like to stare, point blank. Now I don't think we should leave that situation at the Tegel Errorport there and in the past - I think we should all be able to continue to stare, and even more, stare back.

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