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Category: Red Hand Series / Technical Design Series

Artwork - DIY - Red Hand series - yellow Lean Ergonomic Grip Orthogonizer (LEGO) hand - stainless steel 3D-print, acrylic yellow spray paint [first test]

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Artwork - DIY - Red Hand series - yellow Lean Ergonomic Grip Orthogonizer (LEGO) hand - stainless steel 3D-print, acrylic yellow spray paint [first test]; published February 10, 2018, 16:57; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=8283.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1569094927, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Artwork - DIY - Red Hand series - yellow Lean Ergonomic Grip Orthogonizer (LEGO) hand - stainless steel 3D-print, acrylic yellow spray paint [first test]}}, month = {February},year = {2018}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=8283}}


Approximating the quintessential and ubiquitous LEGO hand, I designed one from scratch, got it manufactured in stainless steel and spray painted it with yellow acrylic color.

Here is the real LEGO hand used in advertising and action.

And here is the one that is Ready To Wear and so in its own way, my newly designed item is the first real humanly wearable and thus real LEGO hand. With that it may challenge your views on anthropomorphism, functionality, and on the Uncanny Valley.

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Artistic visions for prosthetic design XXII - Red Hand 2017/I - communicative hand design fitting onto standard Alpha gel liner / Ossur pin with flexible yet reliable comfortable attachment [boosting appearance hand/ boosting wearability in 3D hands]

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Artistic visions for prosthetic design XXII - Red Hand 2017/I - communicative hand design fitting onto standard Alpha gel liner / Ossur pin with flexible yet reliable comfortable attachment [boosting appearance hand/ boosting wearability in 3D hands]; published February 19, 2017, 15:00; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=7262.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1569094927, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Artistic visions for prosthetic design XXII - Red Hand 2017/I - communicative hand design fitting onto standard Alpha gel liner / Ossur pin with flexible yet reliable comfortable attachment [boosting appearance hand/ boosting wearability in 3D hands]}}, month = {February},year = {2017}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=7262}}


#userdrivendesign #bettercyborg #3dprint

The development of an office/presentation hand that is both extremely light and effective as communication tool - rather than the hitherto entrenched exasperated display of ill fated gadgetism with too much dead weight - requires a few tricks. So it is understandable that industry, research and the "open prosthetics" scene has not picked up on it.

So far, "bionic" hand gadgetism has banked upon the fact that still images, photos, posters and derived advertising materials are stunning, and their actual proficiency tests are never longer than some 10 minutes. No bare arm stump survives a 3d printed socket as such though for any serious 8 or 10 hours, and suspension remains problematic, particularly for the self made / open prosthetics scene. That aside, prosthetic hands can still very safely be classified into those that may be used for social or very light use (alliterated as "work", "sports") and those that are really used in a way I find normal but that prosthetists will say is "extreme" (i.e., proper work, or proper sports, as in "real" life usage).

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Large 3D hand to clip on TRS prehensor [prosthetic testing]

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Large 3D hand to clip on TRS prehensor [prosthetic testing]; published February 12, 2017, 17:15; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=7210.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1569094927, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Large 3D hand to clip on TRS prehensor [prosthetic testing]}}, month = {February},year = {2017}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=7210}}


As always, it is the big things that count. Or, is it ; )

Looking back, Extreme Ironing did not get popular by having folks iron shirts in their gardens, cellars, living room or maybe kitchen. It got popular because, hey, wild!

Same with prosthetic hands.

You may want to think outside the box. One of the things I never understood was why people made the "split hook" / "hand" concept a dichotomy.

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Visualizing a Broken Body - Cyborg art implications for visual and functional prosthetic design [art, cultural reflection]

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Visualizing a Broken Body - Cyborg art implications for visual and functional prosthetic design [art, cultural reflection]; published July 10, 2015, 19:30; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=4880.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1569094927, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Visualizing a Broken Body - Cyborg art implications for visual and functional prosthetic design [art, cultural reflection]}}, month = {July},year = {2015}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=4880}}


Introduction

It has been remarked by individuals that believe of themselves to be quite observant - such as - that a prosthetic hook is, culturally, referencing "Captain Hook", such as Geoffrey Ling, and although we cannot think greatly of people that spit on established, proven and functioning prosthetic devices, we can try to see where they come from. What they do is look at popular culture to shape their unreflected but acid critique.

chook

Their problem is only, that they do not keep looking at popular culture. They just go half way to name Captain Hook (if they go that far at all) in talking bad about hook devices, when really they do not consider popular culture all the way. If at all, they should do that with heart and with focus. How can I believe any researchers that talks down to me, as a hook user, by referring to terms such as "arcane" and "Captain Hook", when they are culturally unaware? Because when they are sloppy with their pop culture, what tells me they are not totally sloppy with their "technical" work? Alright, one glance at the edgy iLimb hand and torn up gloves and we know that answer. After all, if one is to look at pop culture, it is not just about extending research programs for preconceived ideas that end up without accessible devices on a small market, is it. It is not just about trying to sell "bionic" hands that may be just about as useful as a bugger in the nose (but cost more). It is about actually trying to understand what that popular culture can tell us were one to go that way, all the way.

And Captain Hook is the earliest pop culture "cyborg" in that he, in some way, integrates human body and technology under a new umbrella identity, that of "Captain Hook". As a famous tweet proposed: if he was given a prosthetic hand, he'd be "Captain Hand". Would have been quite a game changer, that.

Analysis of popular culture imagery and their significance for amputees

The way a damaged body is visualized both when in despair, when suffering damage or disintegration or loss, and when it is at ease, repaired, is present throughout our cultures.

So we can not only look at what the non-disabled public believes in when portraying damage or loss. We can also have a close look at visual elements of recovered, re-established people, and here, people that are "bound" to repair type technology.

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Cocreat 3D [very stylish 3D printing arm/hand startup]

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Cocreat 3D [very stylish 3D printing arm/hand startup]; published May 20, 2015, 20:20; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=4801.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1569094927, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Cocreat 3D [very stylish 3D printing arm/hand startup]}}, month = {May},year = {2015}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=4801}}


Cocreat 3D now sets out to print prosthetic arms/hands. Great designs! And not just that.

Scott J. Grunewald at 3dprint presents a superbly written article that is extremely unusual for its very authentic and clear content, far off the totally confused if not misguided direction that usual media hypes convey:

While working 3D printed hands and mechanical limb replacements have been getting a lot of attention lately, in reality they aren’t really for everyone or for every situation. Motorized prostheses are extremely expensive, require regular maintenance, and are considered by some people who do not have upper body limbs to be more trouble than they are worth. Many people who are missing arms or hands actually have multiple prosthetic devices for different situations, or even eschew them entirely. Additionally people often assume, if someone is missing a limb or has any sort of noticeable disability, that something happened to them when in actuality it often it is something that has been part of them since birth. The automatic assumption that missing a limb makes someone broken and needs to be fixed is frankly a rather onerous one and it is high time that the behavior be addressed. The fact is, most disabled people don’t have the luxury of “fixing” their disability and rightly resent the implication that they are required to do so. Subtle forms of ableism like excessive displays of pity of being inspired by someone with a disability because they “manage” having a disability can often be rather demoralizing and actually have the opposite intended effect. Whereas someone choosing how to present and acknowledge their disability is actually an important personal statement that shouldn’t be taken from them. So while 3D printing is giving an entire generation of people access to useful and affordable prosthetic and assistive devices, it has also given them the ability to define the nature of their device and customize it to their personal needs. And because 3D printing is so inexpensive in comparison to traditionally manufactured prosthetics, it also offers the opportunity to consider personal aesthetics. It is that new freedom that has inspired a Colombian 3D printing business to create a series of 3D printable prosthetic devices designed to be seen and noticed. “We present a series of 3D printable passive prosthesis designed for upper limb amputees. We aim to make uncommon prosthesis that are not meant to be hidden but to be shown without shame,” explained designer and Cocreat3D CEO Esteban Velásquez Rendón. Cocreat3D is still in the prototyping phase of their design process and currently has only printed scaled down versions of the prosthetic devices, but they should be available soon. The prosthetic devices can be custom fit to the wearer’s arm using 3D scanning and 3D modelling technology, and of course be printed in any color or material desired. And given the wide variety of materials that are available, including metallics, neon, and wood, many of these designs could be quite striking. While Rendón’s devices will not be the first passive or decorative prosthetic limbs to be 3D printed, they are the first that seem to be aiming to create a line of products that can be adapted to any user, not designed for a specific person. And as the cost of 3D printers and materials continues to drop, small-scale, personalized manufacturing is made more accessible to almost anyone. 3D printing technology is leading to the democratization of design and manufacturing and having a very real impact on multiple industries and communities. And now a community that is often marginalized and forced to have their mobility, experiences, and lifestyles defined for them is being given the tools to take that power back for themselves, even in such small, seemingly insignificant (to those without disabilities) ways.

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Über das Design und Aussehen der Armprothese

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Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Über das Design und Aussehen der Armprothese; published October 6, 2014, 19:32; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=3497.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1569094927, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Über das Design und Aussehen der Armprothese}}, month = {October},year = {2014}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=3497}}


Beim Aussehen geht es um Starren, Ansehen, es geht in zweiter Linie um territoriale Ansprüche, und dann um intuitive Kompetenzeinschätzung.

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Very cool 3D printed arm [3D printing]

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Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Very cool 3D printed arm [3D printing]; published August 26, 2014, 06:49; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=3419.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1569094927, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Very cool 3D printed arm [3D printing]}}, month = {August},year = {2014}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=3419}}


From the MAKE website [link] we now read that some design student by the name of Evan Kuester [link] came up with the coolest actual 3D prosthetic ever. We did see great prototypes that never made it to any amputee - but here, things are totally different. Here the design starts on an arm that wears it, and it does create the smiles such an arm is supposed to create.

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Prosthetic socket and prosthetic device art [general]

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Prosthetic socket and prosthetic device art [general]; published February 26, 2014, 19:45; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=2837.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1569094927, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Prosthetic socket and prosthetic device art [general]}}, month = {February},year = {2014}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=2837}}


As the diagram below shows, a prosthetic socket or device (P) may be covered by any type of surrounding or adjacent sheath (S), shell (S) or shield (S), for protective covering, for modified appearance of the prosthetic part (P), for art work display, in order to contain functional parts such as mounting mobile devices, to route control elements properly or differently or for other reasons.
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Can looking at a hand make your skin crawl? - Poliakoff E. et al, 2013 [review]

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Can looking at a hand make your skin crawl? - Poliakoff E. et al, 2013 [review]; published November 13, 2013, 15:33; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=2268.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1569094927, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Can looking at a hand make your skin crawl? - Poliakoff E. et al, 2013 [review]}}, month = {November},year = {2013}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=2268}}


There is a new study out by Ellen Poliakoff [1] (Press release [link], article [link]). As someone like me who has gone on about appearances of my prosthetic hands quite a bit, this of course is interesting! So here is the study (Poliakoff et al. (2013) [PDF]) and here is the review.
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[1] E. Poliakoff, N. Beach, R. Best, T. Howard, and E. Gowen, "Can looking at a hand make your skin crawl? Peering into the uncanny valley for hands," Perception, vol. 42, pp. 998-1000, 2013.
[Bibtex]
@article{poliakoff2013,
  title={{Can looking at a hand make your skin crawl? Peering into the uncanny valley for hands}},
  author={Poliakoff, Ellen and Beach, Natalie and Best, Rebecca and Howard, Toby and Gowen, Emma},
  journal={Perception},
  volume={42},
  pages={998--1000},
  year={2013}
}

University of Washington 2010 - students design prosthetic arms [review / what to do with a 3D printer]

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - University of Washington 2010 - students design prosthetic arms [review / what to do with a 3D printer]; published August 10, 2013, 14:44; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=1976.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1569094927, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - University of Washington 2010 - students design prosthetic arms [review / what to do with a 3D printer]}}, month = {August},year = {2013}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=1976}}


Under the auspices of Joanne Tilley, an arm amputee and artist, and Magnus Feil, professor at the University of Washington, students designed prosthetic arms in the autumn quarter of 2009 with new and definitely interesting results.

As we still ponder new prosthetic arm designs and while 3D printing becomes ubiquitous and when toying around ideas in general, let us re-consider these results.

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Becker Phantom Bionic hand - ultra fast, silent, adaptive

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Becker Phantom Bionic hand - ultra fast, silent, adaptive; published May 5, 2013, 12:23; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=1601.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1569094927, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Becker Phantom Bionic hand - ultra fast, silent, adaptive}}, month = {May},year = {2013}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=1601}}


1 Comment

I have the privilege to present to you the Becker Phantom Bionic hand.

It is ultra fast, silent and adaptive.

It is more effective than any other currently sold bionic hand. And it is durable, stable, robust and extremely fashionable. It carries boxes, holds power tools, and allows me to vacuum and to iron. But ultimately it is the many little things that cause me to really fall in love with this hand.

Noise issues with other hands

The Becker Phantom Bionic hand almost completely silent and works without getting all the attention some sick loud gadgets try to snatch these days - so it really works in social settings such as meetings or parties.

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Real Men Wear Red [hard facts]

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Real Men Wear Red [hard facts]; published August 23, 2012, 22:04; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=737.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1569094927, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Real Men Wear Red [hard facts]}}, month = {August},year = {2012}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=737}}


This guy is like me when I was younger. Likewise, I completely go for Red Hands (see all these things I started along the development towards my Red Hand Series).

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Artistic visions for prosthetic design XXI - Red Arm with custom made Centri PVC Glove

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Artistic visions for prosthetic design XXI - Red Arm with custom made Centri PVC Glove; published September 14, 2011, 13:19; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=484.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1569094927, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Artistic visions for prosthetic design XXI - Red Arm with custom made Centri PVC Glove}}, month = {September},year = {2011}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=484}}


For my Becker Imperial hand, I ordered 5 pieces of Centri's PVC glove #130914zz2 (Color Pantone 186C, red) directly from Centri, Sweden. Price for all five gloves including shipping was 566,25 Euro. So after they sent me their offer and I submitted payment, mail was here 5 days later. Really fast for a custom build.

Of course you could ask yourself why anyone would want to wear a red (rather than skin colored) prosthetic hand. Well, there is a long story there, and a long series of tests that went into this (Red Hand / Red Arm series), and also, some more theoretical background on why, exactly and of all colors, it had to be red.

At any rate, this is probably the most aggressive or daring, the most visibly intruding, the most recent and probably the most functional in recent prosthetic hand design. Of course it is extremely functional as all the Red gloves do are ornamenting a Becker hand - which in my view beats competitive products by lengths in terms of weight, appearance, functionality, price and robustness.

Artists and industrial designers have addressed the appearances of prosthetic hands and arms over and over - but as far as I see, none of these have made it into even small series of industrial prosthetic component manufacturers and only a dwindling minority have landed on a dwindling minority of amputees.

I am extremely happy that Centri went along with it. I had asked several manufacturers to comply with specific design requests of mine and so far and quite depressingly, no other one had complied. That is hard to understand as normally, selling more units is better than selling less, and I always offered to pay for any additional cost if any that my customization would have incurred. So on top of being stubborn, we conclude that some other  prosthetic component manufacturers also may have to improve their business manners. After all, requesting a transparent or a colored product doesn't necessarily constitute an indecent offer.

With Centri producing red cosmetic PVC gloves for me as consumer, we now know that

(1) even major prosthetic component manufacturers can fabricate small custom series,

(2) and they can do that at reasonable prices, as well as

(3) reasonably fast and

(4) friendly, and also

(5) they support amputee driven design requests and

(6) sell directly to the customer.

Red was the color I played with for a while (see previous reports in my Red Arm series) and red was the only design a number of friends repeatedly asked me to wear again after I had done so a while back and then changed to other looks. I am more than absolutely delighted on how well that turned out. I had already been a huge fan of the Centri PVC gloves - slippery enough to get in and out of sleeves but good for grips, sturdy enough to survive my rough usage for a while, and good enough in terms of anatomical detail to at least put a bit of smiles on faces. I mean, you have to grin when you see these. With red, however, grin gets a wide smile.
At any rate, here is a first glance on how that came out.

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