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Category: Extreme Cyborging

Subaru dashboard modifications [how it is that we ("we") are?]

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Subaru dashboard modifications [how it is that we ("we") are?]; published October 3, 2019, 17:23; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=10198.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1573562849, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Subaru dashboard modifications [how it is that we ("we") are?]}}, month = {October},year = {2019}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=10198}}


Sometimes, being an arm amputee is just not what other people think it is.  Fucking isn't, really, anyway, but this is such a shining example. A long time ago, I started having a large roll of red sheet rubber at home, an industry size thing. And double sided sticky tape. And stuff like that. Like, an arm amputee whould need that type of stuff. How come "we" - "the" arm amputees - have materials such as that at home? If they do excavations in, say, 50 years, they may find thes things and go "WTF did that guy do with that".

And it remains a valid question for scholars that study us ("us"): you may read all the works of any official apointee about what one has to consider in terms of prostheses - but you will never find any word about sheet rubber and sticky tape as stuff to keep, alongside WD40.

To the best of my knowledge, therefore, you read that here first, too.

So here we go: Subaru dashboard modifications for the benefit of an arm amputee.

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Subaru Weathertech floormat mount [what it is that we ("we") do]

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Subaru Weathertech floormat mount [what it is that we ("we") do]; published October 3, 2019, 16:44; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=10207.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1573562849, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Subaru Weathertech floormat mount [what it is that we ("we") do]}}, month = {October},year = {2019}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=10207}}


This is a bit of Extreme Cyborging microworks: how to make a car floor mat stay in place with sturdy, cheap materials?

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Wie baue ich ein Fahrrad / Velo um für das Fahren mit einseitiger Armamputation? [Erfahrungsberichte / Vorschläge / Anleitung]

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Wie baue ich ein Fahrrad / Velo um für das Fahren mit einseitiger Armamputation? [Erfahrungsberichte / Vorschläge / Anleitung]; published August 29, 2019, 16:36; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=10034.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1573562849, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Wie baue ich ein Fahrrad / Velo um für das Fahren mit einseitiger Armamputation? [Erfahrungsberichte / Vorschläge / Anleitung]}}, month = {August},year = {2019}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=10034}}


Für das Fahrradfahren mit Armamputation (bei mir: Unterarmamputation rechts) habe ich inzwischen einige praktische Erfahrungen gesammelt. Diese sind hier zusammengestellt.

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Fixing espresso machine: swap pump of Rancilio Silvia [Extreme Cyborging]

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Fixing espresso machine: swap pump of Rancilio Silvia [Extreme Cyborging]; published August 24, 2019, 08:57; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=10055.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1573562849, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Fixing espresso machine: swap pump of Rancilio Silvia [Extreme Cyborging]}}, month = {August},year = {2019}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=10055}}


While our contemporary circus directors keep fighting with true elephants (Catch-22s: should one hammer with an iLimb? [link] - should one exhibit defect iLimb gloves under use in public? [link]), I used true and established technology [TRS Jaws - link] and fixed my coffee machine by replacing its pump.

While a new coffee machine (the same model but new) would cost me around 800 USD and while a repair by a company or specialist would cost me maybe around 400 USD, the replacement pump that I got via eBay from Bulgaria was 34,90 USD, with shipping 13 USD. Furthermore, the new pump was better - a more solid build, quieter. In addition, I did not have to suffer absence of the machine for more than about half an hour.

So while I do understand why people prefer to chose their prosthetic hand devices for their suitability for posing with them [link], I would propose to anyone that there might be a possibly more meaningful life beyond that.

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TRS Jaws [new product - first use report]

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - TRS Jaws [new product - first use report]; published August 10, 2019, 10:51; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=9769.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1573562849, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - TRS Jaws [new product - first use report]}}, month = {August},year = {2019}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=9769}}


3 Comments

The TRS Jaws is a voluntary opening gripper where you can set the grip strength by a lever. The grip then varies between very light, maybe under 1 kg or so, to somewhere above 5 kg. This is a first real use report, after I used it permanently since roughly around May 21, 2019, give or take a few hours.

There are just a few points to address at this stage. If you wear a body powered arm for real work [link], you may now buy one.

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BLUE LIGHT SPECIAL - defect iLimb glove poses tricky Catch-22 for Cybathlon 2020 [review]

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - BLUE LIGHT SPECIAL - defect iLimb glove poses tricky Catch-22 for Cybathlon 2020 [review]; published April 21, 2019, 14:42; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=9987.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1573562849, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - BLUE LIGHT SPECIAL - defect iLimb glove poses tricky Catch-22 for Cybathlon 2020 [review]}}, month = {April},year = {2019}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=9987}}


The Cybathlon 2020 race rules confront us with two interesting Catch-22 aspects:

-hammering (if not other dangerous) activity that is not endorsed by "bionic" hand manufacturers [link]

-use of damaged / perforated covers, not endorsed by Ossur (see here)

The iLimb user / clinician manual clearly states "do not use without an approved cover", "do not use with a damaged cover", and, "damaged covers must be replaced by a qualified Touch Bionics technician or technical partner" 1.

However, the Cybathlon Karlsruhe 2019 footage clearly exhibits a torn and perforated glove (defect over the knuckle of finger II/index finger) being used during the competition during the task that has the competitor push a card into a slot.

From view of a user that had serious issues with these "glove covers" that Touch Bionics (then) / Ossur (now) sold for a premium, and who knows a lot about replacing these with better parts despite manual regulations, this is VERY interesting: because a damaged cover unnegotiably operates far outside the acceptable use condition that appears to be insurable. And insurance seems to be a thing there.

To remind you: Touch Bionics glove covers die by themselves when left alone [link] or when used for something as minor, uninteresting and light as a 10 minute car wash [link]. I was left to myself to identify a work glove [link] and a durable cosmetic glove [link].

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BLUE LIGHT SPECIAL - Hammer use to hammer nails, with "bionic" prosthetic hand, poses tricky Catch-22 for Cybathlon 2020 [review]

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - BLUE LIGHT SPECIAL - Hammer use to hammer nails, with "bionic" prosthetic hand, poses tricky Catch-22 for Cybathlon 2020 [review]; published April 20, 2019, 10:28; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=9594.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1573562849, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - BLUE LIGHT SPECIAL - Hammer use to hammer nails, with "bionic" prosthetic hand, poses tricky Catch-22 for Cybathlon 2020 [review]}}, month = {April},year = {2019}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=9594}}


The Cybathlon 2020 race rules confront us with two interesting Catch-22 aspects:

-hammering (if not other dangerous) activity that is not endorsed by "bionic" hand manufacturers

-use of damaged / perforated covers, not endorsed by Ossur [link]

A hammer, particularly a cheap or small one, even more so than a heavy dangerous "real" hammer, is an unlikely tool to use with an ~80 000 USD myoelectric "bionic" device that is specifically built to sustain only the lightest of work. And the subject of hammering, technically, as arm amputee with a prosthetic arm, has become relevant since the Cybathlon 2020 directors [link] have taken it upon themselves to make it a "discipline".

STOP - HAMMER TIME?

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Soldering cable connection and heat shrinking tube over connection (Extreme Cyborging Microworks)

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Soldering cable connection and heat shrinking tube over connection (Extreme Cyborging Microworks); published April 4, 2019, 06:59; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=9463.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1573562849, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Soldering cable connection and heat shrinking tube over connection (Extreme Cyborging Microworks)}}, month = {April},year = {2019}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=9463}}


A full understanding what amputees do or do not in their real life has so far escaped the acumen of research and development. This explains how > 85% of us still run free, without the real restriction of having to pay massive money for technology that basically makes life more difficult.

A notable exception is my body powered split hook. As we can show how academics comprehensively fail to grasp (haha) the scope and use of prosthetic arm use, even a modest achievement such as this appears quite noteworthy and definitely reportable. After all, absolutely no (0) achievement was delivered by any R&D in the domain of myoelectric arms to this day that has made it to actual everyday use and hard work delivery, both since Cybathlon 2016 (that promised it would "push" development) and generally since >40 years of "research" into myoelectric arm control. As they all have more than a lot to learn (not advancing problematically high error rates in >40 years is a catastrophe or wouldn't you say), we are called upon to focus on the basic.

Today, how to attach the cable of a power supply to a pump.

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Myoelectric prosthetic arms do not "really" function - so whom to sell them to? [cynical economic considerations]

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Myoelectric prosthetic arms do not "really" function - so whom to sell them to? [cynical economic considerations]; published February 2, 2019, 15:11; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=9304.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1573562849, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Myoelectric prosthetic arms do not "really" function - so whom to sell them to? [cynical economic considerations]}}, month = {February},year = {2019}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=9304}}


Myoelectric prosthetic arms do not "really" work, we all know that, and it has been clear for decades.These factual aspects are difficult to make that problem go away like, poof. With that the more interesting question is: whom do we sell these to?

While selling to people that are gullible [link] seems to have a lot going for it, it is risky. A more sustained approach may base on taking actual risk factors for myoelectric failure into account:

  • Sweat
  • Weight
  • General error rate

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Disability and the public - prosthetic arms and more: do we appear "competent"? (review)

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Disability and the public - prosthetic arms and more: do we appear "competent"? (review); published December 7, 2018, 15:50; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=8812.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1573562849, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Disability and the public - prosthetic arms and more: do we appear "competent"? (review)}}, month = {December},year = {2018}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=8812}}


The current view of us, what the general public thinks of us, seems to be a major aspect. Of "us", yes.

The research question for this armchair analyst thus will be: are we - arm amputees in specific, and, as people with a visible physical handicap more generally, more broadly as disabled people generally, seen as competent people?

Generally, the answer seems to be a clear "NO" right from the outset.

This should not come as a shock. There are good reasons to believe that, great reasons to make that plausible, perfect reasons to justify that statement. With that, there may be exceptions to that -  people that see through society's fairytales of disability, horror and fears, but they are usually the exception.

As I had figured out quite early into my enquiries into that issue, that this aspect is of absolutely no further practical concern not because it is not disconcerting - but because I cannot change it. And that is a rapid, lean and cynical logical consequence, that I stopped caring about what other people think of me based on, say, visual impression of my prosthetic arm. I may thus safely focus on function and comfort, sustainability and cost, without worrying too much about whether other people treat me as more or less competent based on my looks. Not because it would not be cool to take influence but because it is of no matter as to the target dimension: the tendendy to disregard any mental capacity of people with physical handicap appears to be implemented in many people's thinking outside of any actual experiences. And regardless of what type of prosthesis I wear.

If anything, I might optimize my appearance by simply trying to look reasonably neat.

But to bend over backwards for what really we have to concede are actually strange people? If anything, can we hack their brains?

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Real work - Real Men Don't Eat Quiche - Real Programmers Don't Use PASCAL [reference to popular culture]

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Real work - Real Men Don't Eat Quiche - Real Programmers Don't Use PASCAL [reference to popular culture]; published December 6, 2018, 08:37; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=8850.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1573562849, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Real work - Real Men Don't Eat Quiche - Real Programmers Don't Use PASCAL [reference to popular culture]}}, month = {December},year = {2018}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=8850}}


When I mention real work as opposed to work one does in the role of a pansy boy, I certainly mean this both seriously and tongue in cheek.

Only if you spend your days with real work will you ever understand. You will be dripping wet from sweating. Your clothes will be so entirely smelly from external causes. Your materials will be in dire need for cleaning ever so comprehensively. You have worked for many hours. And you will go back to do it all over again. A prosthetic arm that is built to last 3 years dies within 5 seconds, 15 minutes, or 2 months - using stock commercial parts, it burns and dies like paper consumed by a slow fire, component by component.

Welcome to the world of real work.

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How to apply wood screws in series - demonstration, difficulties [bench work]

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - How to apply wood screws in series - demonstration, difficulties [bench work]; published October 26, 2018, 14:52; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=8717.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1573562849, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - How to apply wood screws in series - demonstration, difficulties [bench work]}}, month = {October},year = {2018}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=8717}}


I happily cut and mounted two wooden boards into a pre-existing shelf frame. For that, a series of wood screws were put into place.

If you are interested in mount, assembly, and screws, read these earlier posts, too:

Dismantling, loading, transporting, unloading and reassembling shelf [bimanual, activity] {illustration, a peek into the life of a person with a handicap}

 

Drill a screw [1-handed way]

The ultimate bimanual task - the IKEA Pax wardrobe system with gliding doors [tricks,tips and yeehaw]

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How to sharpen a pencil fast [technical advice]

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - How to sharpen a pencil fast [technical advice]; published October 26, 2018, 14:34; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=8713.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1573562849, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - How to sharpen a pencil fast [technical advice]}}, month = {October},year = {2018}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=8713}}


The modern Cyborg does not so much excel in having a prosthetic arm that does everything - that would be similar to promoting rainbow colored unicorns: these do not exist.

The modern Cyborg works with modern tools for fast and good results. He thus sharpens pens reliabily and well.

Here is how.

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