expletive-ethereal
expletive-ethereal
expletive-ethereal
expletive-ethereal

Artistic visions for prosthetic design VIII - taking a mannequin shop window arm towards Red Arm II

Cite this article:
Wolf Schweitzer: Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Artistic visions for prosthetic design VIII - taking a mannequin shop window arm towards Red Arm II; published July 2, 2009, 01:53; URL: https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=193.

BibTeX: @MISC{schweitzer_wolf_1571392544, author = {Wolf Schweitzer}, title = {{Technical Below Elbow Amputee Issues - Artistic visions for prosthetic design VIII - taking a mannequin shop window arm towards Red Arm II}}, month = {July},year = {2009}, url = {https://www.swisswuff.ch/tech/?p=193}}


Moving on, I found that I really want a 'hand looking something'. Just because I like its shape look so much better than any other things there. Call me an anthropomorphophiliac.

I still feel significantly quieter, safer, relaxed and self sufficient wearing the hook whereas the hand is not giving me that feeling of being able to rely - but the shape of the hand itself is dear to me, it has a nice to look at aspect.

As other people definitely stare no matter what, I found out that wearing Red (instead of skin colored attempts) appears to shift responses from stressful childish or confused responses to far more mature or matured ones. Obviously we are dealing with each other in terms of "what type of person are you" before we deal with each other in terms of "who as an individual are you".

So in case you want to see the past and future rest of this project, click on the link to my Red Hand Series.

I am significantly inspired by designers' attempts to be 'proaesthetic' (Hans Alexander Huseklepp) or to 'translate an arm into a prosthetic arm' (Marek Gut). Current prosthetics generally lack humanity, style and grace. Often, current prostheses look much like landing gear and make the wearer uncomfortable, self aware, and sometimes depressed (Johanna M. Hawley).

There are certain hard minimal requirements - a prosthesis must be fully reliable, it must be stable and solid up to a point, and the socket or stump mount should be really comfortable and it must not hurt. But other than that, we are free in choosing material and appearance.

So after a very successful first Red Hand and a well received Red Arm I, here is my next prototype.

A Neoprene elbow brace seemed like a good solution to fix this accidentally perfect fit of a cheap mannequin's arm to my stump.

Why a mannequin arm? My thought was, why work on 3D printed mannequin-like parts [1]  when you can get the (almost) finished anthropomorphic doll show piece directly by mail order. From an attention-getting and attention-deflecting if not attention-shaping view point, using a mannequin arm (whose shape has evolved over thousands of invited stares) seems sensible if not well thought out. Conversely, prosthetic hand shapes have not evolved through many design cycles because of different industry dymanics.

I drilled some holes through the polyurethane arm and used a manual drill (below) to pierce the brace.

I used countersunk head screws to allow for a smooth feeling of the inside of the arm. Very important step, this one.

As you see, putting screws in place is not hard - fix male screw using screwdriver and use pliers to put female screw part into place.

Manually, I ground countersunk hole rims into place using this bit:

It is still in the provisional prepainting state. I somewhat like its raw unfinished surface. I feel unfinished as well and so this seems to be a very good reflection for the moment.

With such a nice initial result I decided to get more of these mannequin arms.

I contacted the manufacturer and they were nice enough to set me up with white uncolored versions of their arms.

After all, a hard, solid and stable polyurethane socket that is a good fit (if not perfect fit) to my arm already and that I do not need to build myself - or hugely modify - is a great start for more works.

I wore this mannequin arm to town, of course. Directly.

And the responses were absolutely amazing.

I was addressed, impromptu, in unforseesable content matter, as never before. People thought I was the person to ask, to address, like not once before. I never got these types of interactions with no prosthesis on, with a body powered hook, with a human like looking silicone glove covered prosthetic hand and definitely not with a "bionic" hand.

Don't Go Away :-)

[1] A. Y. Alhaddad, S. E. AlKhatib, R. A. Khan, S. M. Ismail, A. S. Shehadeh, A. M. Sadeq, and J. Cabibihan, "Toward 3D Printed Prosthetic Hands that Can Satisfy Psychosocial Needs: Grasping Force Comparisons Between a Prosthetic Hand and Human Hands," in International Conference on Social Robotics, 2017, pp. 304-313.
[Bibtex]
@inproceedings{alhaddad2017toward,
  title={Toward 3D Printed Prosthetic Hands that Can Satisfy Psychosocial Needs: Grasping Force Comparisons Between a Prosthetic Hand and Human Hands},
  author={Alhaddad, Ahmad Yaser and AlKhatib, Sami Emad and Khan, Rahib Ahmed and Ismail, Salman Mohammad and Shehadeh, Al-Sendibad Said and Sadeq, Abdellatif Mohammad and Cabibihan, John-John},
  booktitle={International Conference on Social Robotics},
  pages={304--313},
  year={2017},
  organization={Springer}
}
Do NOT follow this link or you will be banned from the site!
HTML Snippets Powered By : XYZScripts.com
I footnotes
x2